EJIL Book Discussion

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Book Symposium: Comparative Reasoning in International Courts and Tribunals: Wrap-Up

We hope that readers have enjoyed our discussion of Daniel Peat’s Comparative Reasoning in International Courts and Tribunals. Many thanks to Daniel, Richard, Yvonne, and Antonios for participating. Congratulations are also due to Daniel for winning the 2020 ESIL Book Prize last week! Readers might also be interested in Jarrod Hepburn’s detailed  review of Daniel’s book which is forthcoming in the Journal, and which is available in draft here.

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Book Symposium: Comparative Reasoning in International Courts and Tribunals: A Response

In this symposium, Richard, Yvonne, and Antonios have all kindly taken the time to engage with some of the issues raised in Comparative Reasoning and I would like to take this chance to respond to some of their points. In the interests of space, I’ll limit myself to two issues: first, I will clarify some of my arguments…

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Book Symposium: Comparative Reasoning in International Courts and Tribunals

Lawyers are obsessed with interpretation and international lawyers are no exception. Perhaps there is a good reason for that, but that is not the point of this post. There are different trends in scholarship that emerge at different times, and different sub-trends especially on interpretation, be that ‘systemic integration’ as per 31(3)(c) of the Vienna Convention on the…

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Book Symposium: Comparative Reasoning in International Courts and Tribunals

Daniel Peat’s Comparative Reasoning in International Courts and Tribunals is a remarkable piece of scholarship in many respects, not least the breadth of its subject-matter. In advancing his thesis that domestic law is used in the interpretation of international law in a manner that does not fit squarely within the confines of the interpretative framework set out in…

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Book Symposium: Comparative Reasoning in International Courts and Tribunals

Daniel Peat’s excellent study Comparative Reasoning in International Courts and Tribunals covers important issues in the interpretation of treaties. Its examination of how certain international courts and tribunals have used domestic law and principles or concepts derived from domestic law in reasoning leading to interpretation of treaties provides a useful stimulus to consideration of such materials in treaty…

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