Human Rights

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Discriminating against Υour Own Nationals: The Peculiar Case of New Zealand Seafarers

As the Covid-19 vaccine rollout continues across many countries, thousands of people have been able to regain a sense of normality in their daily life and employment. This has not always been the case for the thousands of seafarers who continue to face serious challenges as a result of the ongoing crew change crisis. While the numerous hardships seafarers have faced because of the Covid-19 restrictions are now well-documented (Doumbia-Henry, 2020; Klein, 2020, Galani, 2021), one case which particularly stands out for all the wrong reasons and justifies special attention, is the case of New Zealand. New Zealand has seemingly sought to facilitate the transfer of seafarers, but its measures suffer serious flaws that have left New Zealand seafarers working internationally without any legal protection. This blog will briefly discuss the relevant New Zealand legislation and explain why it falls short of international labour and human rights standards. The aim of this blog is to shed light on the impact of the exclusion of New Zealand seafarers from the…

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Is All Self-Defense Worth Exercising Under International Law? Revisiting the Use of Force in Nagorno-Karabakh from a Human Rights Perspective

The international law of self-defense is a central branch of international law implicating fundamental matters of sovereignty. In the 20th Century, it also became associated with a broader defense of international peace and security, although these are notoriously hard to define. The jus contra bellum has emerged as premised on a simultaneously complex yet simple idea: states must…

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Poland’s Power Play at its Borders Violates Fundamental Human Rights Law 

While the political and diplomatic power play between the European Union and Belarus over sanctions and gas delivery cuts escalate, the conditions for thousands of migrants physically trapped between borders deteriorates by the hour. Despite a ban of journalists at the border area based on Poland’s declared emergency status, videos and pictures of migrants, including…

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Expanding Human Rights Obligations to Facilitate Climate Justice? A Note on Shortcomings and Risks

COP26 in Glasgow has reinvigorated the already vibrant and urgent discussions about climate justice, what it means, and how to achieve it. One strategy that enjoys significant traction is the idea that expanding states’ human obligations will close the accountability gap in climate law or facilitate climate justice. Recent trends in climate change litigation, in particular, have witnessed…

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The Disputes Between Armenia and Azerbaijan: The CERD Compromissory Clause as a One-way Ticket to Hague

Introduction In September 2021, Armenia and Azerbaijan lodged each against the other an application before the International Court of Justice (Court) (ArA and AzA). Both applications refer to alleged breaches of the 1966 UN Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination (CERD), using its compromissory clause (Article 22) to establish the…

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