Armed Conflict

Page 1 of 52

Filter category

Feature post image

Use of Force in Self-Defence to Recover Occupied Territory: When Is It Permissible?

In a recent piece on Just Security, Tom Ruys and Felipe Rodríguez Silvestre argue that a state whose territory is unlawfully occupied by another state does not have the right to use of force in self-defence to recover the occupied territory. The post considered the position in relation to the recent armed conflict in Nagorno-Karabakh between Azerbaijan and Armenia and suggested that even if it is accepted that the region belongs to Azerbaijan, and is unlawfully occupied by Armenia, Azerbaijan will have lost any rights it may have had to act in self-defence because the status quo has lasted for a quarter of a century. Yesterday, in a post on this blog addressing a range of international legal issues regarding the conflict in Nagorno-Karabkh, Bernhard Knoll-Tudor and Daniel Mueller agreed with the position taken by Ruys and Silvestre arguing that 'continued occupation cannot be equated with “continued attack” permitting the recourse to self-defence in line with Article 51 [of the UN Charter].' Ruys and Silvestre set themselves the following question: ‘When part…

Read more

At Daggers Drawn: International Legal Issues Surrounding the Conflict in and around Nagorno-Karabakh

On 10 November, Azerbaijan and Armenia signed a Statement with the Russian Federation that fundamentally changes the scope of the conflict concerning Nagorno-Karabakh and the surrounding territories as well the status of the so-called “Republic of Artsakh” that had declared independence in early 1992. Even if it remains to be seen whether…

Read more

The United Nations and the Third Geneva Convention

This post is part of a joint blog symposium with the Humanitarian Law and Policy Blog and Just Security exploring the new ICRC Commentary on the Third Geneva Convention. See below for other posts in the symposium. This post discusses the role of the United Nations in ensuring…

Read more

Does the FARC still exist? Challenges in Assessing Colombia’s ‘Post Conflict’ under International Humanitarian Law

Three years ago last month, the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) guerrillas formally completed demobilization, marking the end of their 53-year conflict with the Colombian government. Over 10,000 FARC members demobilized and handed in weapons in a process verified by a United Nations mission in the country. Nonetheless, some FARC fighters rejected…

Read more

Armenia v Azerbaijan before the European Court of Human Rights

On 28 September 2020, Armenia lodged a request for interim measures against Azerbaijan in view of the recent reignition of the conflict in and around the region of Nagorno-Karabakh. One day later, the European Court of Human Rights decided to apply Rule 39 of the Rules of the Court. While…

Read more
  • Page 1 of 52
  • Last