magnify
Home International Tribunals Archive for category "International Criminal Court"

Rome Statute at 20: Suggestions to States to Strengthen the ICC

Published on August 6, 2018        Author:  and
Twitter
Facebook
Google+
LinkedIn
Follow by Email

This year marks the 20th anniversary of the adoption of the Rome Statute, the treaty that established the International Criminal Court (ICC, Court), the world’s only permanent tribunal with a mandate to investigate and prosecute genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes, and the crime of aggression. The euphoria that greeted its adoption has been tempered by an appreciation of its limits. Disappointment with the Court’s record has led to pessimism about the future of international criminal justice generally. Critics point out that the ICC has spent nearly US$1.5 billion since it began operations in 2002 and, in that time, convicted just three people on charges of war crimes and crimes against humanity.

The truth is more nuanced

But the ICC is more active, and its cases more complex, than many of its critics realize. The ICC has brought cases against 42 individuals, resulting in eight convictions (five for witness tampering). Cases have failed, for a variety of reasons – including state obstruction of access to evidence, and bribery and intimidation of witnesses – at the pre-trial, trial and appeal stages. Four persons are currently on trial; another is in ICC custody at the confirmation of charges stage. A large proportion of those charged are fugitives.

Another key point is that the ICC is a court of last resort. It does not have primacy of jurisdiction like the tribunals for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY), Rwanda (ICTR), Sierra Leone (SCSL), and Cambodia (ECCC). Instead, the ICC’s guiding principle is complementarity: it will not intervene if a State is genuinely investigating or prosecuting. So, by design, the ICC’s duty to investigate and prosecute is deferential to domestic jurisdictions, which can result in challenging circumstances for all involved. Unlike predecessor tribunals, the Office of the Prosecutor (OTP) must devote considerable resources to encouraging, and assessing the progress of, domestic legal processes.

The Court carries a heavy workload and is forced to spread its resources thinly. Whereas the ICTY, ICTR, SCSL and ECCC had scores of lawyers and analysts poring over evidence from one conflict, the ICC has to deal with many. It is currently carrying out “preliminary examinations” in Afghanistan, Colombia, Gabon, Guinea, Iraq, Nigeria, Palestine, the Philippines, Ukraine and Venezuela. It is conducting investigations in Uganda, the DRC, Darfur, the Central African Republic (CAR), Libya, Côte d’Ivoire, Mali, Georgia and Burundi. Each requires mastering a complex conflict with shifting alliances, an array of State and non-State actors, and dozens of societal factors central to a proper contextual understanding. Each requires gaining access to reliable evidence necessary to determine which party is responsible for which crimes, and whether the state is genuinely investigating or prosecuting. This requires a great deal of diplomatic engagement with numerous States. Read the rest of this entry…

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
 

Geographical Remoteness in Bemba

Published on July 30, 2018        Author: 
Twitter
Facebook
Google+
LinkedIn
Follow by Email

Introduction

The ICC Appeals Chamber’s acquittal of Jean-Pierre Bemba Gombo continues to provoke discussion. In a previous post, I addressed the Appeals Chamber’s treatment of the relevance of a commander’s motivation in taking measures to prevent or punish the crimes of his subordinates. This issue of motivations was one of two putative errors emphasised by the Appeals Chamber in its summative paragraph – paragraph 191 – on the Trial Chamber’s finding that Mr Bemba failed to take all necessary and reasonable measures. The second putative error identified in that paragraph concerned the Trial Chamber’s failure to properly take into account the difficulties that Mr Bemba would have faced as a remote commander sending troops to a foreign country.

The description of Mr Bemba as a remote commander has been emphasised in numerous media reports, as well as in academic commentary. A concern raised in the latter is that the decision introduces a new distinction into the law of command responsibility – a distinction between remote and non-remote commanders, with the former being held to a lower standard than the latter. This post analyses how the Appeals Chamber dealt with the remoteness issue. First, it sets out the Majority Judgment’s findings on Mr Bemba’s status as a remote commander and suggests that it is not clear whether it intended to draw a legal distinction between commanders. Second, it argues that the drawing of such a distinction would be indefensible as a matter of principle – geographical position ought not be used to distinguish between commanders. Third, and happily, it shows that even if the Majority Judgment is unclear, President Oboe-Osuji’s Concurring Separate Opinion and the Joint Dissenting Opinion of Judges Hofmanski and Monageng indicate that there weren’t three votes for the introduction of any such distinction. In other words, the decision in Bemba does not stand for the proposition that we are now faced with an additional distinction in the law of command responsibility. Finally, it returns to Bemba itself, and the Majority Judgment’s reasoning on this point. That reasoning is not convincing. Read the rest of this entry…

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
 

Not Appropriate:  PTC I, Palestine and the Development of a Discriminatory ICC Jurisprudence

Published on July 26, 2018        Author:  and
Twitter
Facebook
Google+
LinkedIn
Follow by Email

On 13 July, Pre-Trial Chamber I (PTC I) issued an unprecedented decision in which it ordered the Registry to establish unique public information and outreach activities for the “benefit of the victims in the situation in Palestine”, as well as to report on its situation activities on an ongoing basis.  No Pre-Trial Chamber has made the same orders with respect to victim outreach in a situation under preliminary examination before, and the legality, timing, and singular nature of the decision all give rise to concern. 

The decision singles out victims of one situation whilst ignoring others, reflecting a double standard which forms the basis of Israel’s complaints that its rights to equal treatment are systematically violated before 21st century international organisations and tribunals. In this sense, the decision is illuminating as it demonstrates to international criminal law practitioners how PTC I has substantiated Israel’s complaint of double standards in the Chambers’ first substantive engagement with the Situation in Palestine. Given the unique way that the Situation in Palestine has been singled out, PTC I’s decision will be viewed by many as a political one.  This is an accusation which, especially after the collapse of the Kenya cases, the ICC should be more wary of making itself susceptible to.

The Legality of the PTC Decision Read the rest of this entry…

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
 

First and Second Degree Genocide? Considering a Case for Bifurcation of the Law

Published on June 19, 2018        Author: 
Twitter
Facebook
Google+
LinkedIn
Follow by Email

At its inception, the crime of genocide, which broadly concerns criminal conduct targeted at a group, was generally seen as somehow more culpable or aggravated than international crimes targeted at an individual. Critical opposition to that view exists (See Milanović on the Karadžić and Mladić Trial Chamber judgments). Contemporary application, however, of the law continues to consider genocide as “horrific in its scope” precisely because perpetrators identify “entire human groups for extinction” and “seek to deprive humanity of the manifold richness its nationalities, races, ethnicities and religions provide” (Krstić, Appeals Chamber judgment, para. 36).

The Appeals Chamber in Krstić has emphasized that the gravity of genocide is “reflected in the stringent requirements which must be satisfied before this conviction is imposed” (para. 37). This includes proving a specific intent to destroy a group such that the group targeted for destruction was either the whole “protected group”, or a “substantial” part of that whole (the “substantiality test”). Where the requirements are satisfied, the Appeals Chamber implores that “the law must not shy away from referring to the crime committed by its proper name” (para. 37).

My contention is that the law in fact has shied away from referring to the crime of genocide by its proper name. Read the rest of this entry…

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
 

Commanders’ Motivations in Bemba

Published on June 15, 2018        Author: 
Twitter
Facebook
Google+
LinkedIn
Follow by Email

Introduction

No doubt there is much to be written about Jean-Pierre Bemba Gombo’s acquittal by the Appeals Chamber – on its implications for the ICC, for politics in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and for the standard of review in future appeals. In this post, I will focus on a single issue addressed by the Appeals Chamber: the relevance of a commander’s motivation in taking measures to prevent or punish the crimes of his subordinates. This may seem a narrow issue – it was, initially, but one aspect of one element of the test for superior responsibility that formed part of one ground of appeal. However, this issue turned out to play a critical role in the majority’s decision to acquit the defendant.

Background

A majority of the Appeals Chamber – Judges Van den Wyngaert, Eboe-Osuji and Morrison – held that the second ground of appeal and part of the third ground of appeal were determinative of the appeal. The second ground averred that the conviction exceeded the charges. The third ground averred that Mr Bemba was not liable as a superior, with the relevant part upheld concerning whether he took all necessary and reasonable measures to prevent or repress the commission of his subordinates’ crimes. Within this part, the majority’s decision emphasised, in particular, two putative errors in the Trial Chamber’s finding that Mr Bemba failed to take all necessary and reasonable measures (para 191). The first concerned the Trial Chamber’s assessment of Mr Bemba’s motivation in taking the measures that he did take. This is the issue addressed in this post. Read the rest of this entry…

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
 
Tags: ,

In Bemba and Beyond, Crimes Adjudged to Commit Themselves

Published on June 13, 2018        Author: 
Twitter
Facebook
Google+
LinkedIn
Follow by Email

And now, it seems, we must fear to endure crimes adjudged to have no cognizable author – crimes that everyone knows occurred, but that escape the assignment of responsibility that is supposed to be an essential function of international criminal justice. Crimes adjudged, as one commentator lamented, to have committed themselves.

Provoking these dire sentiments is Friday’s International Criminal Court judgment in Prosecutor v. Bemba, in which a bitterly divided Appeals Chamber exonerated a politician-warlord from the Democratic of Congo (DRC) whom a Trial Chamber had sentenced to serve eighteen years in prison. The Appeals Chamber majority, constituting three of the five appellate judges, first maintained that the 2016 trial judgment merited no deference, then proceeded to evaluate the case de novo, and ultimately found all five counts of conviction unsustainable. The man whom para. 13 of the appeals decision identifies as “President of the MLC, a political party founded by him and based in the northwest of the DRC, and Commander-in-Chief of its military branch, the ALC,” thus was acquitted of charges on which he had been held since 2008. Bemba is awaiting the results of his appeal on a separate conviction for witness tampering. Yesterday, the Court ruled that he could join his family in Belgium while he awaits sentencing in that case. Read the rest of this entry…

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
 

Fiddling While Rome Burns?  The Appeals Chamber’s Curious Decision in Prosecutor v. Jean-Pierre Bemba Gombo

Published on June 12, 2018        Author: 
Twitter
Facebook
Google+
LinkedIn
Follow by Email

On March 21, 2016, after a 4-1/2 year-long trial that heard the testimony of 77 witnesses, the introduction of 773 items of evidence, and gave rise to a transcript that was thousands of pages long, a unanimous Trial Chamber convicted Jean-Pierre Bemba Gombo of crimes against humanity and war crimes committed by his troops in the Central African Republic from 2002-2003 and sentenced him to 18 years imprisonment.  The case was the first to find a perpetrator guilty of command responsibility under article 28, and the first ICC case involving a conviction for sexual violence. The three trial judges, were unanimous in their assessment of Bemba’s culpability under the Statute, although two judges raised questions regarding the parameters of article 28.

On June 8, the Appeals Chamber reversed, 3-2, and acquitted the accused finding that Bemba’s conviction exceeded the facts and circumstances described in the charges brought against him and declined to permit a trial on the facts it found to be outside the scope of the initial Trial Chamber Judgment. Judges Monagang (Botswana) and Hofmański (Poland) would have upheld the conviction and penned a lengthy Dissenting Opinion.  Judge Eboe-Osuji (now President of the Court) would have permitted a retrial on the new charges his colleagues found to be outside the scope of the original conviction, but was apparently unable to persuade his colleagues to join him in that view. 

How did this happen? Read the rest of this entry…

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
 

A Prudential, Policy-Based Approach to the Investigation of Nationals of Non-States Parties

Published on May 30, 2018        Author:  and
Twitter
Facebook
Google+
LinkedIn
Follow by Email

On 22 May, Palestinian Foreign Minister Riyad al-Maliki submitted a referral to the International Criminal Court (ICC) regarding the situation in Palestine since 13 June 2014, with no end date.  This follows the Prosecutor’s statements on 8 April and 14 May responding to the situation on the Gaza border (which were themselves unusual, if not unique, examples of OTP practice).  As with the proposed investigation of US nationals in the Situation in Afghanistan, the Myanmar and Bangladesh issue that is under consideration and the investigation of Russian conduct in Georgia and Ukraine, the question of whether, and if so how, the ICC may exercise jurisdiction over nationals of non-state parties absent a Security Council referral is pressing once again.

By proceeding with investigation of Russian conduct in Georgia and Ukraine, Israeli conduct in Gaza and the West Bank, and American conduct in Afghanistan, legal issues which arise upon exercise of the Court’s enforcement jurisdiction will foreseeably give rise to challenges both before the ICC, as well as in national jurisdictions during surrender proceedings. This contribution suggests that a prudential, even cautious, policy-based approach to the investigation of nationals of non-states parties may help the OTP avoid pitfalls resulting from proceeding without sufficient regard to non-states parties’ jurisdictional objections. Read the rest of this entry…

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
 
Tags:
Comments Off on A Prudential, Policy-Based Approach to the Investigation of Nationals of Non-States Parties

What lies beneath? The turn to values in international criminal legal discourse

Published on April 23, 2018        Author: 
Twitter
Facebook
Google+
LinkedIn
Follow by Email

On the 9th of April, the Office of the Prosecutor (OTP) of the International Criminal Court submitted a request for a ruling by the Pre-Trial Chamber on whether the Court has territorial jurisdiction over the deportation of Rohingya people from Myanmar to Bangladesh. This development may impact how the ICC approaches its territorial jurisdiction in future, and raises interesting questions over the legal nature of the crime of deportation. However, the submission also gives rise to questions of a more theoretical nature that relate to the normative basis of international crimes, or more specifically, the acts that constitute them. The Prosecutor’s submission on jurisdiction over deportation into Bangladesh highlights an emerging trend in international criminal law towards identifying and surfacing the individual values or rights underlying international crimes. This coincides with a broader debate on the legal goods protected by these crimes, and invites us to consider the implications of this trend for the communicative function of the law.

Part of the Prosecutor’s submission on jurisdiction in Bangladesh addresses the distinction between the crimes of deportation and forcible transfer. Read the rest of this entry…

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
 

Prosecuting ‘The Beatles’ before the ICC: A Gateway for the Opening of an Investigation in Syria?

Published on April 19, 2018        Author: 
Twitter
Facebook
Google+
LinkedIn
Follow by Email

Calls have been mounting for Alexanda Kotey and El Shafee Elsheikh, two fighters captured by the Syrian Kurds, to be tried in the UK, the US, or at the International Criminal Court (ICC) in The Hague. Kotey and Elsheikh were part of a group of four Islamic State militants known as ‘the Beatles’ (because of their British accents). Although not particularly high ranking within ISIS, the Beatles are infamous for their role in the imprisonment, torture and killing of Western hostages. There is reason to believe that they are responsible for war crimes and crimes against humanity. 

The purpose of this post is to examine the feasibility and propriety of bringing the Beatles before the ICC for trial. Kotey and Elsheikh have been stripped of their British citizenship so as to stop them from re-entering the UK. The UK defence minister, Tobias Ellwood, is however arguing that Kotey and Elsheikh should be tried by the ICC. Kotey himself affirmed that a trial at the ICC ‘would be the logical solution.’ As of now, the Syrian Kurds do not seem to have received a request for the surrender of the two fighters to the Court.

The Temporal Scope of the ICC’s Personal Jurisdiction Read the rest of this entry…

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
 
Tags: