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Home Archive for category "Announcements and Events"

Announcements: Ghent University Vacancy for Predoctoral Researcher; CfP Junior Faculty Forum for International Law; International Conference on Climate Risk and Divestment; Dialogues on International Law Conference

Published on January 12, 2020        Author: 

 

1. Ghent University Vacancy for Predoctoral Researcher. Ghent University currently have a vacancy for a four-year doctoral research project dealing with the legality of extraterritorial/secondary sanctions and the possible judicial and non-judicial remedies for third States to counter such sanctions. Further information is available here

2. Call for Papers – Junior Faculty Forum for International Law. A call for papers has been issued for the Ninth Annual Junior Faculty Forum for International Law, convened by Dino Kritsiotis (Univ. of Nottingham – Law), Sarah M.H. Nouwen (Univ. of Cambridge/European Univ. Institute), and J.H.H. Weiler (New York Univ. – Law), together with guest conveners Han Liyu and Zhu Jingwen (both of Renmin Law School). The Ninth Forum will be held at the Renmin University of China in Beijing on 29 – 30 June 2020. The deadline for applications is 7 February 2020. The call is here. As with previous years, selected presentations from the Forum will be invited to appear in the European Journal of International Law. Read the rest of this entry…

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Announcements: International Legal Proceedings Relating to Israeli-Palestinian Conflict Event; Trade, Law and Development 12th Anniversary Special Issue

Published on January 5, 2020        Author: 

 

1. International Legal Proceedings Relating to Israeli-Palestinian Conflict Event. The University of Westminster is hosting  an event on the International Legal Proceedings Relating to Israeli-Palestinian Conflict on 16 January 2020 from 6-8pm. The presentation examines the significance of these initiatives with regard to the international legal standing of the parties and in terms of the addressing substantive legal controversies relating to the conflict. For more information, see here. You can book your place here

2. Trade, Law and Development 12th Anniversary Special Issue. The Board of Editors of Trade, Law and Development is pleased to announce ‘Trade in Services: A Holistic Solution to New-Found Issues in Trade Law?’ as the theme for its 12th Anniversary Special Issue (Vol. XII, No. 1). The GATS was enforced in 1995, when global dynamics in terms of trade, political and economic relations, development and policies was vastly different from what it is today. This theme has a two-fold objective: analysing existing literature on GATS, while, inter alia, also assessing areas such as education, e-commerce, new regulations, and competition law issues. An illustrative list of the sub-issues under the theme are: Digital Trade & E-Commerce, Brexit issues, the Trade in Services Agreement Negotiations, Impacts on Maritime Trade, etc. Manuscripts may be submitted via e-mail or ExpressO. For further information about the journal please click here. For submission guidelines, please click here. In case of any queries, please feel free to contact us at: editors[at]tradelawdevelopment[dot]com. Last date for submissions is 15 March 2020. 

 

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Most Read Posts in 2019

Published on January 2, 2020        Author: 

Happy New Year to our readers! We wish you a wonderful 2020 and thank you for reading the blog in 2019. Below is a list of the 20 posts that received the most views in 2019. An interesting observation is that most of these posts relate to developments in international tribunals: the International Court of Justice; the International Criminal Court, the European Court of Human Rights, and also the International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea and the Human Rights Committee. Some of these post focus on specific cases (eg, Chagos and Gambia v Myanmar at the ICJ, Bashir at the ICC, the Burqa Ban cases at the ECtHR/ HRC, Detention of Three Ukranian Naval Vessels at ITLOS), while others focus on broader institutional issues at these courts. The list highlights the attention that was given to the brilliant series of posts by our Contributing Editor, Douglas Guilfoyle, on the problems faced by the ICC, with no less than three of those posts making the top 20 most read posts. From several conversations with key court watchers and officials, I had the sense that those posts were highly influential in crystallising the sense that something needs to be done about what seemed to be impending crisis of confidence with regard to the Court. Google Analytics confirms that the breadth of influence in terms of numbers of readers. 

We would like to thank all those who contributed posts in 2019! Read the rest of this entry…

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Happy New Year!

Published on January 1, 2020        Author:  and

 

The Editorial Team of EJIL, EJIL: Talk! and EJIL Live wishes our readers and authors a happy and fruitful new year.

 

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Announcements: CfP Colloquium on International Investment Law & State Capitalism; Emile Noël Fellowship Program; CfS Melbourne Journal of International Law

Published on December 22, 2019        Author: 

 

1. Call for Papers – ESIL supported Colloquium on ‘International Investment Law & State Capitalism’. The Athens Public International Law Center (Athens PIL) of the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens School of Law is hosting a Colloquium on ‘International Investment Law & State Capitalism’, which will take place on 15 and 16 October 2020 in Athens, Greece, and is jointly organized by Athens PIL, the Tilburg Law and Economics Center (TILEC) at Tilburg University, and Hamad Bin Khalifa University (HBKU) College of Law. Abstracts must not exceed 800 words and must be submitted by email to agourg {at} law.uoa(.)gr; gdimitropoulos {at} hbku.edu(.)qa; and P.Delimatsis {at} uvt(.)nl. The full call for papers, including potential topics, can be found here

2. Emile Noël Fellowship Program. The Jean Monnet Center at NYU School of Law is currently accepting applications for its Emile Noël Fellowship Program  for AY 2020/21. Limited number of fellowships are available. Deadline is 15 January 2020.  For further information, she here

3. Call for Submissions: Melbourne Journal of International Law. The Editors of the Melbourne Journal of International Law (‘MJIL’), Australia’s premier generalist international law journal, are now inviting submissions for volume 21(1). The deadline for submissions is 31 January 2020. MJIL is a peer-reviewed academic journal based at the University of Melbourne and publishes innovative scholarly research and critical examination of issues in international law. Submissions and inquiries should be directed to law-mjil {at} unimelb.edu(.)au. For more information, please visit here.

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Favourite Readings 2019 – Recommendations for Vacation Reading

Published on December 17, 2019        Author: 

 

As in previous years, EJIL’s Review Editor, Christian J. Tams, has invited EJIL board members and (associate) editors to offer short reflections on their favourite books of the year 2019. No strict rules apply — the posts are meant to introduce books that left an impression, irrespective of their genre. Today we have selections from Sarah Nouwen. You can read all the posts in this series here.

 

The timing of this series of book recommendations reveals the idea behind it: books for the holidays. In a time of year when part of the professional world temporarily slows down, as though taking a deep breath for the year that is to come, the meaning of vacation can correspond with its etymological roots –vacare, ‘being unoccupied’, thus leaving time and headspace to nourish the brain and soul with the words of others. In this period of reflection on what was, and anticipation of what is to come, I crave books about how life is given meaning, in whatever form or way. In practice, however, the ‘vacation’ is often pretty filled: with chopping vegetables, wrapping gifts, seeing friends and family, and unpacking the dishwasher, leaving little time for the pile of books that I have been longing to take up. Under these circumstances, I need a list of recommendations not for what to read myself, but for what to give to others, or, even better, what to share with others. Thus, here follows a rather mixed bag, a bag for friends and family. As always, the first presents are for the younger generations (whether budding lawyers or not).

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Favourite Readings 2019 – Couch Vacation

Published on December 16, 2019        Author: 

 

As in previous years, EJIL’s Review Editor, Christian J. Tams, has invited EJIL board members and (associate) editors to offer short reflections on their favourite books of the year 2019. No strict rules apply — the posts are meant to introduce books that left an impression, irrespective of their genre. Today we have selections from Johann Justus VaselYou can read all the posts in this series here.

 

When reflecting towards the end of the year on the piles of essays and books one has waded through, my limited powers of recollection force me to think that many works are ephemeral or at least fungible. So what was actually a “good read”? It’s hard to spell out the criteria, and maybe the term is also misleading. In my understanding a work qualifies to be a “good read” if I deem it to have a larger and lasting impact, if it changes or enriches my perspective. This year I selected three books from the political science arena, but they all elucidate important legal aspects. I hope that you will find them as meaningful as I do.

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Announcements: Vacancy at the International Nuremberg Principles Academy; Custom and International Investment Law Conference; When Blockchain Meets Arbitration Conference

Published on December 15, 2019        Author: 

 

1. Vacancy at the International Nuremberg Principles Academy. The International Nuremberg Principles Academy (Nuremberg Academy), located in Nuremberg, the birthplace of modern international criminal law, is a non-profit foundation dedicated to the promotion of international criminal law and human rights.  The Nuremberg Academy is seeking to recruit a Project Officer with a special focus on working on the research project “Length of the Proceedings at the International Criminal Court”. For more information please see here.  

2. Conference: Custom and International Investment Law. On 23-24 September 2020 the Washington College of Law will hold a conference on Custom and International Investment Law. The conference will focus on the issues relating to the interaction between customary international law and international investment law, both from a theoretical and a practical perspective. It will bring together leading academics, international judges/arbitrators and other practitioners. The deadline for the submission of abstracts is 1 April 2020. More information can be found here.

3. Conference: When Blockchain Meets Arbitration. This conference, When blockchain meets arbitration: the birth of decentralised justice” will take place on 31 January 2020 (9am-5 pm). It is organised by the Centre for European Law and Internationalisation (CELI). The conference explores the nascent concept of decentralized justice – that is to say, arbitration on a blockchain. A panel of speakers will discuss the interplay between blockchain and the law by conceptualizing smart contracts as legal constructs, including means to resolve smart contracts disputes. Taking Kleros as a case study, the discussion will then focus on the latest developments in both the theory and the practice of blockchain arbitration as well as its relationship with online arbitration. Bookings can be made here

 
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New EJIL: Live! Interview with Hala Khoury-Bisharat and Michael A. Becker

Published on December 15, 2019        Author: 

 

In this episode of EJIL: Live! Sarah Nouwen, Editor-in-Chief of EJIL, speaks with Hala Khoury-Bisharat, Lecturer in law, Ono Academic College School of Law, Haifa, Israel and Michael A. Becker, Adjunct Assistant Professor, Trinity College Dublin, about the Symposium on International Commissions of Inquiry, which appears in EJIL’s 30:3 issue. Michael Becker first speaks about the motivation of the organizers – Doreen Lustig of Tel Aviv University, Sarah Nouwen and himself – to develop a project on Commissions of Inquiry (CoIs) and more specifically why they framed the project in terms of the difference that such commissions make. Hala Khoury-Bisharat then introduces her case study in the Symposium on the Goldstone Inquiry in Israel and the unintended backlash effects it produced for human rights organizations in the country. As the first Palestinian Israeli woman to hold a professorial position in Israel, she then elaborates, on a more personal note, on the obstacles that she, as a member of a minority in Israel, had to face and overcome in her career. The interview concludes with some reflections by Michael Becker on the possible future directions for international commissions of inquiry. The interview was recorded at the Lauterpacht Centre for International Law. Thanks are given to the Lauterpacht Centre and to Pembroke College, Cambridge, for making the filming possible.

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Favourite Readings 2019 – What IS the Real Price of Development?

Published on December 13, 2019        Author: 

 

 

As in previous years, EJIL’s Review Editor, Christian J. Tams, has invited EJIL board members and (associate) editors to offer short reflections on their favourite books of the year 2019. No strict rules apply — the posts are meant to introduce books that left an impression, irrespective of their genre. Today we have selections from Diane Desierto. You can read all the posts in this series here.

 

Do communities and populations have any means of knowing what the real price is of the development decisions made on their behalf by their respective States? Are they always just doomed to reckon with seeking redress after-the-fact for any negative externalities that result from these development decisions (e.g. environmental, health, climate change, labor, alongside a whole host of human rights impacts from these development decisions), resorting to a variably asymmetric (and quite imperfect) spectrum of local, regional, or international dispute settlement processes?  These questions were foremost in my mind throughout 2019, especially given the responsibility of working with fellow Experts for the UN Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights and the UN Open-Ended Intergovernmental Working Group on the Right to Development with respect to the consultation process and drafting of the legally binding instrument on the Right to Development. Likewise, in a year when the Nobel Prize (technically the Bank of Sweden Prize) for Economics was awarded to development economists Esther Duflo, Abhijit Banerjee, and Michael Kremer (who pioneered the export of Randomized Control Trials (RCT) methods in medical research into experiments on human subjects (mostly the poor) to determine the efficacy of development-funded interventions, but generally without such RCTs being conducted using any universal or global code of ethics), what has been argued by Duflo et al. as the relative end of poverty visibly exemplified by the Chinese model of development (an amalgam of ‘authoritarian capitalism’,“market authoritarianism”, or “capitalism with Chinese characteristics”) certainly provokes much rethinking into what development is under international law, and what costs States can legally and legitimately incur to realize that development. 

Most importantly, at a time when the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has issued various reports pointing to the rapid escalation of environmental risks for the entire planet (see 2019 reports on increased risks given climate change impacts on the oceans and cryosphere, land, and global warming of 1.5 degree Celsius) alongside magnified (and often more open) violations (if not dismissals) of human rights around the world (see human rights global reports here, here, and here), can States’ decision-makers still afford to craft development plans without putting the question of negative externalities from development projects at the forefront of policymaking?

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