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Happy New Year and Most Read Posts of 2018!

Published on December 31, 2018        Author: 
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I would like to wish our readers a very Happy 2019! Before we close out 2018, I would like to set out our most read posts of the year. These give a snapshot of the some of the key developments in international law over the course of the year, and/or of key incidents in international affairs with consequences for international law.

The top 10 posts are presented here with the numbers 11 to 20 below the fold.

Many thanks to all of our contributors in 2018, and, to you, our readers 

1) Diane Desierto, Young Philippine Lawyers Arrested Today for “Obstruction of Justice” in the Philippines’ Drug War(Aug. 2018)

2) Marko Milanovic, The Syria Strikes: Still Clearly Illegal, (April 2018)

3) Dapo Akande, The International Criminal Court Gets Jurisdiction Over the Crime of Aggression(Dec. 2017)

4) Marko Milanovic, Palestine Sues the United States in the ICJ re Jerusalem Embassy, (Sept. 2018)

5) Leila N. Sadat, Fiddling While Rome Burns?  The Appeals Chamber’s Curious Decision in Prosecutor v. Jean-Pierre Bemba Gombo, (June, 2018)

6) Marc Weller, An International Use of Force in Salisbury?, (Mar. 2018)

7) Dapo Akande, Ecuador Seeks to Confer Diplomatic Status on Julian Assange: Does this Oblige the UK to Allow Him to Leave the Embassy & Is the Matter Headed to the ICJ?(Jan. 2018)

8) Monica Hakimi, The Attack on Syria and the Contemporary Jus ad Bellum, (April 2018)

9) Joseph Weiler, Publish and Perish: A Plea to Deans, Faculty Chairpersons, University Authorities, (Nov. 2018)

10) Koldo Casla, Supreme Court of Spain: UN Treaty Body individual decisions are legally binding(Aug. 2018) Read the rest of this entry…

Filed under: EJIL
 

Our Most Read Posts of 2017

Published on December 30, 2017        Author: 
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As 2017 comes to an end we would like to thank our readers for coming back to us time and again over the course of the year. This year we have had more readers than in any previous year and more page views.

I would like to welcome Gail Lythgoe to our editorial team. Gail joins us as Associate Editor with particular responsibility for managing our social media presence. She is currently a PhD Candidate at the University of Glasgow and Managing Editor of Oxford International Organizations. Hopefully, readers have already noticed a difference in our activity on Twitter and Facebook.

To conclude 2017, I set out below our 20 most read posts of the year.  We strive to cover a very wide range of international law issues on this blog, but of course it is up to readers to decide on which issues resonate more with them at particular moments. As is often the case, many of those most read pieces are those which offer timely (and may I add insightful) commentary on the big issues of the day raising questions of international law. The US missile strikes in Syria in April, Catalonia’s bid for independence and some of the issues relating to Brexit are leading examples  this year. However, the list of most read pieces this year include, one by Douglas Guilfoyle and another by Marko from several years ago. Those two pieces feature as the most read post and the third most read post since the blog was established 9 years ago (with this piece being the second most read post). 

Two other remarkable pieces in our top 20 for 2017 are the speeches by the UK Attorney General and another by the Australian Attorney-General setting out the understanding of those states on the law relating to self-defence and in particular, their views on issues relating to self defence in anticipation of armed attacks. We are grateful to the Attorneys General for choosing EJIL:Talk! as a forum for dissemination of the official position of their governments.

 The top 20 posts are here in reverse order with the top 10 below the fold. Happy New Year to all of you for 2018!

20) Jure Vidmar, Catalonia: The Way Forward is Comparative Constitutional Rather than International Legal Argument  (Oct. 2017)

19) Dapo Akande, The ICC Assembly of States Parties Prepares to Activate the ICC’s Jurisdiction over the Crime of Aggression: But Who Will be Covered by that Jurisdiction? (June 2017)

18) Marko Milanovic, Self-Defense and Non-State Actors: Indeterminacy and the Jus ad Bellum (Feb. 2010)

17) Marko Milanovic, European Court Decides Al-Skeini and Al-Jedda (July 2011)

16) Monica Hakimi, US Strikes against Syria and the Implications for the Jus ad Bellum (April 2017)

15) Monica Hakimi, North Korea and the Law on Anticipatory Self-Defense (Mar. 2017)

14) Dan Joyner, Legal Bindingness of Security Council Resolutions Generally, and Resolution 2334 on the Israeli Settlements in Particular (Jan. 2017)

13) Senator George Brandis QC (Attorney-General of Australia),  The Right of Self-Defence Against Imminent Armed Attack In International Law, (May 2017)

12) Dapo Akande, ICJ Elections 2017: UN General Assembly and Security Council Elect Four Judges to the ICJ But fail to Agree on a Fifth, yet again! + Trivia Question (Nov. 2017)

11) Jeremy Wright QC MP (Attorney General of the UK), The Modern Law of Self-Defence (Jan. 2017) Read the rest of this entry…

 
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