magnify
Home Posts tagged "International Criminal Court"

Election Rules for ICC Judges: A Balanced Bench Through Quasi-Quotas

Published on December 4, 2017        Author: 

At its 16th session starting today (Monday 4 December) in New York, the ICC Assembly of States Parties (ASP) will proceed to elect six new judges for the Court. In doing so, the ASP will follow a special procedure that has no precedent in any other international organization, and probably also not in any domestic context. Among the election officers of ICC States Parties, these rules are primarily known for being complicated, to put it mildly. What gets less attention though is the fact that these rules have also been quite successful in achieving their goal: namely of nudging States Parties toward electing a bench of judges that is balanced in terms of regional representation, gender, and legal expertise.

In previous years, I have had the pleasure of facilitating the review of these rules (which resulted in only minor adjustments). In that context, I was tasked to prepare an informal guide to the election rules, so that they could be more easily understood. Pasted below is the brief explanation of the election procedure contained in the guide, which also contains a more detailed commentary of specific provisions.

The idea behind the system (originally developed by my predecessor as legal advisor to the Mission of Liechtenstein in New York, Jonathan Huston) is quite intriguing. It came up as delegations at the ICC PrepComm – tasked with preparing the ground for the future sessions oft he ASP – were deeply divided over how to design the election rules for judges. Some wanted quotas for regions (as is the case for many UN bodies), some wanted additional gender quotas. Others wanted no such restrictions. And then there was also the binding requirement of the Rome Statute to elect a minimum number of judges with certain expertise (criminal law vs. International law). Read the rest of this entry…

 

International and Domestic Implications of South Africa’s Withdrawal from the ICC

Published on October 24, 2016        Author: 

In the early hours of Friday 21 October 2016, it was revealed that the South African Minister of International Relations and Cooperation had issued official notification of South Africa’s withdrawal from the International Criminal Court (a copy of the instrument of withdrawal can be seen here). This was received by the UN Secretary-General, starting the prescribed 12-month notice period for withdrawal from the Court (Article 127 of the Rome Statute). This announcement came as a shock to many in the legal community in South Africa and abroad. While the South African government had expressed unhappiness with the Court, and had previously threatened withdrawal, there was no public indication that an official decision to withdraw had been taken, nor had any public consultation taken place on the matter in Parliament or elsewhere.

This decision will have significant implications for the legal landscape in South Africa, and likely also for the position of other African States in the ICC. It is also possible that it will lead to the fundamental weakening of the ICC itself. Here I consider various implications of this sudden announcement, both from the domestic South African and international perspectives. First, I address the status of the instrument of withdrawal in international and domestic law. I then look at the impact of withdrawal for the enforcement of international criminal law in South Africa. Finally, I address some possible consequences for the ICC itself.

Is it Legal?

The first question is whether the notice of withdrawal signed by the Minister is lawful, from the lenses of international and domestic law, given that this was a purely Executive act that was not preceded by any form of public or parliamentary consultation, let alone approval. Similar questions arise in the context of the Brexit ‘Article 50’ debate. While it seems that the instrument of withdrawal is likely sufficient to take effect in international law, it is doubtful that the domestic legal requirements have been adhered to. Read the rest of this entry…