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Home Posts tagged "Global Pact"

Back to Square One or a New Blueprint has been Found for the ‘Refugee’ Definition?

Published on March 5, 2019        Author: 
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Editor’s note: This post is part of the ESIL Interest Group on Migration and Refugee Law symposium on The UN Global Compacts on Migration and Refugees: The Twin Peaks?

Our search for a new blueprint (or searching for a way to find a new blueprint) for the ‘refugee’ definition started already in 2016, at “The Migration Conference” in Vienna, through a comparison regarding the definition of refugee and more importantly its implementation in Brazil, Italy and Turkey. Afterwards, “The Movement of People Conference” in Hamburg in September 2016 opened the floor (at least) in academia to compare the definitions of refugee and its implementation in different parts of the world, which was not a new problem, but still had no solution at the time. Representatives from both sides of the Atlantic, i.e. the European Union (EU), USA, Latin America, United Kingdom, Germany, and Turkey came together to understand why all the implementations differ from each other, despite the fact that they are all States parties to the 1951 Geneva Convention and have derived their domestic definitions of refugee from it.

The results showed that this was due to the fact that there are different rationales behind the forced human mobility to various destination countries. For instance, while Latin America has dealt with hundreds of thousands of displaced people coming from Colombia and Northern Triangle of Central America among many other reasons also as climate refugees, EU Member States and Turkey still deal mostly with mass human mobility from Syria and the Middle East in general, because of the armed conflicts happening there. Read the rest of this entry…

 
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Governance and the UN Global Compact on Migration: Just another Soft Law Cooperation Framework or a New Legal Regime governing International Migration?

Published on March 4, 2019        Author:  and
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Editor’s note: This post is part of the ESIL Interest Group on Migration and Refugee Law symposium on The UN Global Compacts on Migration and Refugees: The Twin Peaks?

Does the UN Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration (GCM) fulfill the criteria of a legal regime for international migration or is it just another soft law cooperation framework amidst many? If the GCM is merely a cooperation framework, then what is its contribution to international migration law (IML)? Is it limited to institutional questions, including the quality of follow-up, monitoring and review? What does it mean to ascribe the GCM a “governance capacity”? Does “governance”, as a counter concept to government, feature at the same time as an antidote to anarchy, so that the GCM could be fashioned as the complement to the “missing regime” of IML?

To resolve the ambiguity over the GCM’s governance ambition means for one to reply to the question posed by Aleinikoff in 2007, i.e. to what extent the GCM provides for the long-sought after “architecture” to govern the “substance” of IML. To respond to the challenge secondly means to uncover to what extent the GCM has overcome the “anarchy” underlying the fragmented state of IML, also called the “piecemeal approach” (Opeskin et al. 2012). This approach allowed States in the Global North to keep national sovereignty over territory and borders untouched by design, but also for few exceptions of multilateral cooperation on service providers in the General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS) and regional schemes on free movement of persons. However, the “management” of population flows from sending countries has led to uncertain outcomes for the protection of migrants’ rights, while rendering their entitlements an often-neglected legal category in international law.

In this post, we will provide a first appraisal of whether the GCM has governance potential – a capacity which may move it beyond the mere “international cooperation framework”, designed by GCM drafters. Read the rest of this entry…

 
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