New Issue of EJIL (Vol. 27 (2016) No. 3) Published

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The latest issue of the European Journal of International Law (Vol. 27, No. 3) is out today. As usual, the table of contents of the new issue is available at EJIL’s own website, where readers can access those articles that are freely available without subscription. The free access article in this issue is Deborah Whitehall’s A Rival History of Self-Determination. EJIL subscribers have full access to the latest issue of the journal at EJIL’s Oxford University Press site. Apart from articles published in the last 12 months, EJIL articles are freely available on the EJIL website.

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Kriangsak Kittichaisaree says

October 11, 2016

Congratulations to the EJIL for continuing its excellent quality. There are some errors, though. E.g., p. 594 tells readers that the "ICCPR" stands for "International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights"!?. P. 606 asserts that according to Art. 27(1) of UNCLOS, the coastal State can exercise criminal jurisdiction over "merchant ships" under certain conditions, but "even commercially operated refugee vessels will not usually be registered as 'merchant ships', except where scrap cargo ships are used.". In fact, that provision of UNCLOS refers to "foreign ship[s]" and has no mention of "merchant ships" at all!?

The editor(s) need to be more careful.

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Kriangsak Kittichaisaree says

October 11, 2016

Congratulations to the EJIL for continuing its excellent quality. There are some errors, though. E.g., p. 594 tells readers that the "ICCPR" stands for "International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights"!?. P. 606 asserts that according to Art. 27(1) of UNCLOS, the coastal State can exercise criminal jurisdiction over "merchant ships" under certain conditions, but "even commercially operated refugee vessels will not usually be registered as 'merchant ships', except where scrap cargo ships are used.". In fact, that provision of UNCLOS refers to "foreign ship[s]" and has no mention of "merchant ships" at all!?

The editor(s) need to be more careful.