Terrorism

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Obama’s Counter-Terrorism Speech: A Turning Point or More of the Same?

Gleider I Hernández is Lecturer in Law, University of Durham. The author is grateful to Dr Philippa Webb, Professor Michael Schmitt and Thomas Liefländer for their exchanges of views on this topic. The 2012 revelation that United States President Barack Obama was immersed in the authorisation and execution of targeted drone strikes by the CIA against suspected terrorists in Afghanistan, Pakistan, Yemen and Somalia was, to put it mildly, important. Shielded from open scrutiny from Congress or the judiciary, and operating on the margins of the public eye, the ‘kill list’ of candidates has resulted in an astonishing number of drone strikes, with the Bureau of Investigative Journalism estimating between 240 and 347 people have been killed in Yemen since 2002, with a further 2541 to 3533 killed by some 278 CIA drone strikes in Pakistan. As such, three developments in the last fortnight go some way to lifting the veil of secrecy that had heretofore surrounded the US’ weaponised drones program (on which I was asked to comment…

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The ECtHR Finds Macedonia Responsible in Connection with Torture by the CIA, but on What Basis?

André Nollkaemper is Professor of Public International Law at the Faculty of Law of the University of Amsterdam. He directs the project on 'Shared Responsibility in International Law' (SHARES); this piece is cross-posted on the SHARES Blog. On 13 December 2012, the European Court of Human Rights (‘the Court’) found the that the…

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The Constitution of EU Counter-Terrorism Law

Cian C. Murphy is a lecturer in law at King’s College London the author of EU Counter-Terrorism Law: Pre-emption & the Rule of Law. Over the past decade counter-terrorism law has come to be understood as a distinct field of study for legal scholars. Part constitutional law, part criminal, and – increasingly –…

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R v Mohammed Gul: Are You a Terrorist if You Support the Syrian Insurgency?

Dr Kimberley N. Trapp is lecturer in law at Newnham College, University of Cambridge. In its recent decision in Regina v Mohammed Gul[1], the Court of Appeal held that there is nothing in international law which requires the broad definition of terrorism under the Terrorism Act 2000, as amended,[2] to be read…

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