Terrorism

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The Law and Tech of Two Targeted Killings

The New York Times recently published two fascinating pieces on two separate instances of targeted killings. The first is on the tragic denouement of the 20 years of US presence in Afghanistan – a drone strike conducted on 29 August by the US military in Kabul, purportedly against terrorists planning a second deadly attack against the international airport there. Instead of terrorists, however, the drone strike killed 10 civilians, including seven children; Zemari Ahmadi, the driver of the car struck by the drone was in fact an aid worker for a US NGO, who had hoped to seek asylum in the United States. The US military admitted its error after an investigation by the Times and journalists on the ground. The second piece is a detailed exposé of the 27 November 2020 assassination by Israeli agents of Mohsen Fakhrizadeh, the scientist leading the Iranian nuclear programme. This was the culmination of a series of such targeted killings of scientists involved in the Iranian nuclear programme,…

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Repatriating the Children of Foreign Terrorist Fighters and the Extraterritorial Application of Human Rights

UPDATE: The CRC admissibility decision referred to in the post is no longer publicly available via ODS. I am unsure as to why that’s the case. Readers can find it here. Now that we have all (sort of) recovered from the US elections, back to our regular programming: last week the UN Committee on…

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Does the FARC still exist? Challenges in Assessing Colombia’s ‘Post Conflict’ under International Humanitarian Law

Three years ago last month, the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) guerrillas formally completed demobilization, marking the end of their 53-year conflict with the Colombian government. Over 10,000 FARC members demobilized and handed in weapons in a process verified by a United Nations mission in the country. Nonetheless, some FARC fighters rejected…

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Counter-terrorism control orders come to Switzerland: is assigned residence for ‘potential terrorists’ compatible with art. 5 ECHR?

The legislative responses to terrorist violence in Europe over the past several years have shown a new trend of circumventing proper judicial review and protections of criminal law by relying on ‘administrative measures’. Broadly, such measures can be defined as restrictions of a non-criminal nature, ordered by the executive in the name of terrorism prevention, and…

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Green Light from the ICJ to Go Ahead with Ukraine’s Dispute against the Russian Federation Involving Allegations of Racial Discrimination and Terrorism Financing

  On 8 November 2019, the ICJ delivered its highly anticipated judgment in Ukraine v Russia on the preliminary objections raised by the Russian Federation with respect to the Court’s jurisdiction and the admissibility of Ukraine’s claims under the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination (CERD) and the International Convention for the…

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