Symposia

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Asia’s Ambivalence About International Law & Institutions: Introduction to Opinio Juris and EJIL:Talk! mini-symposium

A decade after moving from New York to Singapore, I began work on this article in the hope of understanding what seemed to me a paradox. Well into the much-vaunted “Asian century”, the states of this region arguably benefit most from the security and economic dividends of a world ordered by international law and institutions — and yet those same states are the least likely to subscribe to such norms or participate in the bodies they create. Regionally, there is no counterpart to the continent-wide organizations in Europe, Africa, or the Americas; individually, Asian states are most reluctant to sign onto most international regimes and underrepresented in the entities that govern them. The article opens with a brief history of Asia’s engagement with international law. The focus is on three aspects that continue to have resonance today and contribute to the wariness of international law and institutions. First and foremost is the experience of colonialism by India and many other countries across the continent: for centuries international law helped justify…

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Joint Symposium with Opinio Juris: Simon Chesterman’s ‘Asia’s Ambivalence About International Law & Institutions: Past, Present, and Futures’

This week we will be jointly hosting a symposium with Opinio Juris in relation to Simon Chesterman’s article “Asia’s Ambivalence About International Law & Institutions: Past, Present, and Futures“, which is available here in draft form, the final version appearing later this month in EJIL. Chesterman is Dean of the National University of Singapore Faculty of Law.

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AJIL Unbound Symposium on the Crime of Aggression

In June 2010, parties to the Statute of the International Criminal Court (ICC) meeting in Kampala, Uganda agreed amendments to the ICC Statute which would allow the ICC to prosecute the crime of aggression. However, they also agreed that the Court would only be able to exercise jurisdiction with respect to the crime of aggression subject…

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ESIL – International Human Rights Law Symposium: International Human Rights Law and International Cultural Heritage Law: Cooperation, Conflict or Cooption?

Beyond being “the law of pretty things”, international cultural heritage law (ICHL) is an important site for the enactment and contestation of the boundaries of international law. It is the law, mostly under UNESCO, that deals with objects, sites and practices that create, shape and conform identity. It is in close relationships to human rights, but…

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ESIL-International Human Rights Law Symposium: ‘Operationalising’ the Relationship Between the Law of Armed Conflict and International Human Rights Law

Today it is accepted that both the law of armed conflict and international human rights law continue to apply in situations of armed conflict. Indeed, the European Court of Human Rights recently addressed the co-application of these two bodies of law for the first time in Hassan v. The United Kingdom, and the potentially landmark case of…

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