Symposia

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Will the Asian Vision of International Law become Dominant in 2017?

Editor's Note: This post forms part of a symposium being run by EJIL:Talk! and Opinio Juris in relation to Simon Chesterman's article "Asia's Ambivalence About International Law & Institutions: Past, Present, and Futures", which is available here in draft form, the final version appearing later this month in EJIL. Starting today, the two blogs are publishing a number of posts discussing the article, and we thank all of those who have contributed to  this symposium. Professor Chesterman explores the reasons for the relative under-participation and under-representation of Asian states as a group (what he refers to as Asia) in international lawmaking and in international institutions. Chesterman acknowledges the difficulty in referring to Asia as a group, due to the diversity of the continent. “Indeed,” he adds, “the very concept of ‘Asia’ derives from a term used in Ancient Greece rather than any indigenous political or historic roots.” Diversity is not only cultural or political, but also grounded in different interests, especially given the “great power interests of China, India and Japan” and perhaps also Russia, another crucial Asian player. Chesterman…

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Asia’s Ambivalence About International Law & Institutions: Introduction to Opinio Juris and EJIL:Talk! mini-symposium

A decade after moving from New York to Singapore, I began work on this article in the hope of understanding what seemed to me a paradox. Well into the much-vaunted “Asian century”, the states of this region arguably benefit most from the security and economic dividends of a world ordered by international law and institutions — and…

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Joint Symposium with Opinio Juris: Simon Chesterman’s ‘Asia’s Ambivalence About International Law & Institutions: Past, Present, and Futures’

This week we will be jointly hosting a symposium with Opinio Juris in relation to Simon Chesterman’s article “Asia’s Ambivalence About International Law & Institutions: Past, Present, and Futures“, which is available here in draft form, the final version appearing later this month in EJIL. Chesterman is Dean of the National University of Singapore Faculty of Law.

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AJIL Unbound Symposium on the Crime of Aggression

In June 2010, parties to the Statute of the International Criminal Court (ICC) meeting in Kampala, Uganda agreed amendments to the ICC Statute which would allow the ICC to prosecute the crime of aggression. However, they also agreed that the Court would only be able to exercise jurisdiction with respect to the crime of aggression subject…

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ESIL – International Human Rights Law Symposium: International Human Rights Law and International Cultural Heritage Law: Cooperation, Conflict or Cooption?

Beyond being “the law of pretty things”, international cultural heritage law (ICHL) is an important site for the enactment and contestation of the boundaries of international law. It is the law, mostly under UNESCO, that deals with objects, sites and practices that create, shape and conform identity. It is in close relationships to human rights, but…

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