Sources of International Law

Page 1 of 22

Filter category

Feature post image

Lavrov’s Lament: A Russian take on the rules-based global order

At the end of last month, Russian Minister of Foreign Affairs Sergei Lavrov wrote a spirited defence of international law in Kommersant, Russia’s main business paper. True to form, the country’s top diplomat lamented that, unlike the West, Russia still wants universally accepted principles of international law to govern international affairs. But what does it mean for these principles to be universal? And how does Russia play a role in the ‘internationality’ of international law? According to Mr. Lavrov, in a multipolar future, the West should no longer get away with imposing its will on the rest of the world. Yet, despite Mr. Lavrov’s ostensible sympathy for a more equal international order, the article scarcely hides a nostalgic plea for Russia’s return to the rule maker status the country enjoyed before 1989. In doing so, Mr. Lavrov provides proof for the divergence of national approaches to international law, as has been noted by Anthea Roberts, Lauri Mälksoo, and others. We are left to conclude that Russian approaches to many aspects of international law…

Read more

International Law at NATO’s Brussels Summit

The June 2021 NATO summit in Brussels was noteworthy for the U.S. renewal of its commitment to the Alliance. Speaking with Secretary-General Stoltenberg, President Biden reassured NATO members (the “Allies”) that “NATO is critically important for U.S. interests” and “Article 5, we take as a sacred obligation.” Also noteworthy was the extent to which NATO…

Read more

A Study in Contrasting Jurisdictional Methodologies: The International Court of Justice’s February 2021 Judgments in Iran v. USA and Qatar v. UAE

The International Court of Justice issued two significant Decisions on Jurisdiction in early February: its 3 February 2021 Judgment in Iran v. United States (where the Court accepted jurisdiction over a dispute in which Iran alleged that the United States breached the 1955 Treaty of Amity between these two States) [hereafter, Iran v. US Judgment on Preliminary…

Read more

Old Habits Die Hard: Applying Existing International Law in Cyberspace and Beyond

In the past few years, a growing number of states have expressed their official positions on the applicability of international law in cyberspace. Most recently, New Zealand and Israel shared their own views on the topic to beef up the crowd. Initiatives of this kind are welcome and contribute to the gradual clarification of the extent…

Read more

Israel’s Cautious Perspective on International Law in Cyberspace: Part II (jus ad bellum and jus in bello)

In Part I of this series, I assessed Israel’s approach to the identification and interpretation of international law in the cyber context, as set forth in an important virtual speech by Israel’s Deputy Attorney General for International Law, Dr. Roy Schöndorf, at the “Disruptive Technologies and International Law” conference hosted by the US Naval War College’s…

Read more
  • Page 1 of 22
  • Last