Self Defence

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Self-Defense and Non-State Actors: Indeterminacy and the Jus ad Bellum

Self-defense in response to armed attacks by non-state actors is undoubtedly one of the most interesting - and controversial - issues in modern international law. It is of great practical relevance, as for instance, with the ongoing use of drones for the targeted killings of suspected terrorists (a question I've discussed here), and has attracted a great deal of scholarly attention. Lindsay Moir has just published a book with Hart/Oxford that I'm sure will provide a strong contribution to the field. I would particularly like to draw our readers' attention to the recent discussion in the EJIL provoked by Christian Tams' excellent article on the use of force against terrorists, with responses by Federico Sperotto and Kimberley Trapp, and a rejoinder by Christian. In this post, I would like to add a few thoughts on how the indeterminacy of state practice and opinio juris has caused an indeterminacy in the law, which I don't think can be denied or removed by any legal analysis, no matter how exhaustive and competent.

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Drones and Targeted Killings: Can Self-Defense Preclude Their Wrongfulness?

Ken Anderson has an excellent, very interesting post regarding the US strategy of using drones for targeted killings of suspected terrorists in Pakistan and elsewhere (a topic we've addressed at the blog before). He argues that, as a matter of both law and policy, the current justification of the US government for its targeted killing practices is insufficient,…

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Are the US Attacks in Pakistan an Armed Attack on Pakistan? A Rejoinder

I agree entirely with the first point that Professor Paust makes in his previous post , about the impossibility of imputing the non-state actor attacks to Pakistan due to incapacity. Certainly imputation doesn't make sense on these facts as he outlines them. However, the second point he makes goes to the heart of my question. Professor Paust asks,…

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Are US Attacks in Pakistan an Armed Attack on Pakistan? A Response to Timothy Waters

In a response to my previous post, Professor Timothy Waters, asks why it is that US attacks on non-State actors in Pakistan would not be acts of war against Pakistan. In this post, I attempt to answer that question. First, we can't impute al Qaeda or Taliban attacks on our soldiers, which are continuous and well-known, to…

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The United States’ Use of Drones in Pakistan

Editors Note: We feature below a discussion between a group of leading United States academics on the US's targeting of Taliban and Al Qaeda targets  in Pakistan. Each of the discussants is a  leading writer on international law, and on the use of force in particular.  We are delighted to post this discussion on EJIL:Talk! As usual, readers are invited to post…

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