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Home International Tribunals Archive for category "Inter-American Commission on Human Rights"

The IACtHR Advisory Opinion: one step forward or two steps back for LGBTI rights in Costa Rica?

Published on February 27, 2018        Author: 
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On 9th January 2018, the IACtHR issued Advisory Opinion No. 24 on gender identity, equality and non-discrimination for same-sex couples, a ground-breaking decision for the advancement of LGBTI rights in the Americas. However, the adverse effect it had on the recent presidential elections in Costa Rica may jeopardise this achievement.

The Advisory Opinion was requested by Costa Rica in 2016. the IACtHR was called to clarify the interpretation and scope of several articles of the American Convention on Human Rights (ACHR) in relation to the following questions:

  1. Considering that gender identity is a protected category within the American Convention, does the state have an obligation to recognise and facilitate the change of name of individuals in accordance with their own gender identity?
  2. If so, is the judicial procedure for the change of name, instead of an administrative one, contrary to the American Convention?
  3. According to the American Convention, is the current Costa Rican judicial procedure for the change of name not applicable to individuals who wish to change their name based on their gender identity? Should they rather be given the possibility of resorting to a free, fast and accessible administrative procedure?
  4. Considering the duty not to discriminate on the basis sexual orientation, should the State recognize all patrimonial rights deriving from a same-sex relationship?
  5. If so, is it necessary for the State to establish a legal institution regulating the legal status of same-sex couples, and to recognise all patrimonial rights stemming from such relationships?

In response to the first three questions, the IACtHR recalled its jurisprudence on the matter (e.g. Atala Riffo and Daughters v Chile and Duque v Colombia) and strongly confirmed that sexual orientation and gender identity are protected categories under the American Convention. Read the rest of this entry…

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Venezuela denounces American Convention on Human Rights

Published on September 12, 2012        Author: 
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The Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela has given notice of its intention to withdraw in a year’s time from the leading regional human rights treaty in the Americas, with the Secretary-General of the Organization of American States (OAS) having confirmed receipt of the notice of denunciation here: http://www.oas.org/en/media_center/press_release.asp?sCodigo=E-307/12. (Rumours back in July had suggested that Venezuela was considering withdrawal.) The Inter-American Commission on Human Rights has also issued a press release announcing that Venezuela is withdrawing from the American Convention on Human Rights, with the denunciation to take effect in September 2013. The IACHR press release can be found here: http://www.oas.org/en/iachr/media_center/PReleases/2012/117.asp

The American Convention on Human Rights (also known as the Pact of San José, Costa Rica) was adopted in 1969 and entered into force in 1978. It is a key regional human rights instrument for the protection of civil and political rights within the Western Hemisphere (with the Convention working alongside the 1948 American Declaration of the Rights and Duties of Man which is relied upon for OAS states that are not Convention parties). Venezuela has been a party to the Convention since ratification in 1977. Venezuela has also recognized the competence of the Inter-American Court of Human Rights since 1981, with Venezuela’s record before the court found here: http://www.corteidh.or.cr/pais.cfm?id_Pais=13.

A broken (but soon to be fixed?) link to the text of Venezuela’s denunciation can be found here:  http://www.oas.org/dil/treaties_B-32_American_Convention_on_Human_Rights_sign.htm#Venezuela. The Venezuelan Ministry of Foreign Affairs has posted an interview with the Minister here (in Spanish): http://www.mre.gov.ve/index.php?option=com_content&view=category&layout=blog&id=2&Itemid=325

This is not the first denunciation for the American Convention on Human Rights, with Trinidad and Tobago having denunciated in 1998 due to a stated need to address delays in death penalty cases as a result of the time taken before international human rights bodies. Venezuela is the second state to withdraw from the American Convention on Human Rights, notably at a time when the inter-American human rights system is undertaking consultations with respect to reforms (see earlier post).

Readers will also be aware that Venezuela is not a newcomer to denunciations, having earlier this year denounced the Convention on the Settlement of Investment Disputes between States and Nationals of Other States (the ICSID Convention), becoming the third Latin American state to denounce the ICSID Convention (after Bolivia in 2007 and Ecuador in 2009). Under the terms of the ICSID Convention, which provides for a six-month notice period, Venezuela’s denunciation came into effect in July.

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More Human Rights Reforms Under Discussion

Published on August 4, 2012        Author: 
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Readers interested in reform within the international human rights system, including the reform of the UN human rights treaty monitoring system previously discussed here, may be interested in yesterday’s announcement by the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR), adding a regional dimension to discussions.

The IACHR serves as the focal point for human rights within what is touted as “the world’s oldest regional organization” – the Organization of American States (OAS). The OAS is a pan-American regional organization akin to the Council of Europe, supported by 35 states in the Western Hemisphere, and headquartered in Washington DC. The IACHR was created in 1959, and formally established in 1960, with a mandate to promote and protect human rights throughout the region. It is one of two organs of the inter-American human rights regime, the other being the Inter-American Court of Human Rights based in San José, Costa Rica. With functions similar to the UN treaty-monitoring bodies, and the old European Commission on Human Rights, the IACHR monitors the situation of human rights in the various OAS states, conducts on-site visits, handles individual complaints, and hosts several thematic rapporteurs. The Commission also brings cases to the Court, as was done in the old European human rights system prior to Protocol 11.

But all is not rosy at the IACHR, with a current docket of 8500 individual complaints currently pending before the seven-member part-time body. Financial resources have not kept up with the volume of complaints, and each commissioner also serves as a thematic rapporteur, with consequent duties and workload. Events within the Americas also add to the workload. In 2002, for example, the IACHR received 3783 complaints as a result of the banking measures adopted in Argentina, and further petitions were received in 2009 following the coup d’état in Honduras.

The IACHR has agreed to embark on an in-depth examination of its procedures and mechanisms. To this end it has, as of 3 August 2012, published its methodology document for what it calls its “2012 process of reform of its Rules of Procedure and of its institutional policies and practices” (with the Rules of Procedure last undergoing significant reform back in 2009). It is expected that consultation documents regarding the individual complaint procedure, precautionary measures, the monitoring function, and the promotion function, will be published on or before 25 August 2012, to be followed by a one-month period for comments from all users of the inter-American system. By the end of September, we should see an IACHR report to the OAS Permanent Council on possible reforms to the Rules, policies and practices of the IACHR, and in October, the IACHR promises to convene two hearings on strengthening measures to give key actors an opportunity for dialogue.

The webpage for the “Process for Strengthening the IACHR” can be found here.

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