European Convention on Human Rights

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The Group of Experts under the Istanbul Convention on Preventing and Combating Violence against Women and Domestic Violence and the ECtHR: Complementary or Contradictory Tools?

The Istanbul Convention is a blueprint document in handling violence against women as the first legally binding treaty in Europe specifically devoted to the problem of violence against women. One aspect of the Istanbul Convention that deserves particular attention is the Group of Experts on Action against Violence against Women and Domestic Violence (GREVIO), which was established as the monitoring body of the implementation of the Convention by state parties. GREVIO is the first enforcement mechanism with an exclusive mandate to handle cases relating to violence against women in Europe, it has already adopted its first evaluation reports on several state parties. This positions GREVIO as a major legal authority to determine state responsibility in addressing violence against women within Europe, alongside the ECtHR (European Court of Human Rights). In this post, I will analyse how any potential clash between these two bodies’ approaches in tackling violence against women is likely to occur, and how these clashes should be handled within the principles of international human rights law. GREVIO:…

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NGOs and ECtHR judges: A Clarification

The 5 March blog post by Grégor Puppinck is not really a result of academic research, nor does it manage to identify an actual problem of public policy. Despite its civility in style and appearance of balance, the blog post, as well as the underlying European Centre for Law and Justice (ECLJ) report written by the…

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NGOs and judges at the ECtHR: a need for clarification

What are the relationships between the judges of the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR) and leading non-governmental organisations, and what should the Court be doing about them, particularly in cases in which doubts as to the judges’ impartiality might arise? This is the topic of this post, which is  worthy of interest and needs to be addressed,…

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(Not) Investigating Kunduz and (Not) Judging in Strasbourg? Extraterritoriality, Attribution and the Duty to Investigate

  A 2009 airstrike near Kunduz, Afghanistan, that led to more than 100 casualties and was ordered by a German colonel will be the subject of oral arguments in the Grand Chamber (GC) of the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR) in the case of Hanan v. Germany, tomorrow, 26 February 2020. On 4 September…

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State-Empowered Actors in the European Court of Human Rights – State Sovereignty and Council of Europe Authority

  Human rights conventions constitute a particular category of international law in respect of which individuals, exceptionally, are empowered to act because of their status as rights holders. Nowhere is this more evident than in regional bodies, such as the Council of Europe, which are founded on human rights conventions the ratification of which is a necessary criterion…

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