Human Rights

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Sorting Out the Torture Memo Issues, Part I: The Devaluation of Non-Penal International Norms

Editor's Note: See herefor a post welcoming Professor Roth While we continue to await the long-withheld report of the U.S. Justice Department’s Office of Professsional Responsibility (OPR) on the conduct embodied in the notorious Office of Legal Counsel (OLC) "torture memoranda," W. Bradley Wendel sorts out some of the issues in the current issue (12:1) of Legal Ethics. In "The Torture Memos and the Demands of Legality" (earlier version available on SSRN), Wendel reviews five books on the subject, including one authored by protagonist John Yoo. The result is a balanced, but ultimately pointed, account that avoids the oversimplifications that have frequently marked both criticisms and defenses of the memos’ authors. Though reciting the usual criticisms of some of the memos’ more extravagant claims, Wendel renders a distinctive analysis of the government lawyer’s duties. Wendel concedes "that there are many different virtues of government, of which legality is only one." He moreover allows that Attorney General Robert Jackson’s 1940 rationalizations…

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Report on UK Complicity in Torture

On Tuesday the Joint Parliamentary Committee on Human Rights published its report on allegations of UK complicity in torture. I would particularly like to draw our readers’ attention to the Committee’s legal analysis of the scope of the UK’s obligations as a matter of two treaties, the UN Convention against Torture and the European Convention on Human…

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The Law Lords’ Final Judgments

Yesterday the House of Lords delivered its last judgments as the final court of appeal in England and Wales. For many, many, many years (as with all thing English), the House of Lords had a dual function, sitting as both a part of the legislature and the judiciary. From 1 October this year, the new Supreme Court of the United…

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Who Uses the European Court of Human Rights, and Who Wins? Evidence from New Studies

Gabriel Swain is Research Associate, School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research, University of Kent.  Previously, he worked as a researcher for the Council of State Governments, a US-based public policy think tank, where he wrote on topics including climate change, natural resource policy, energy policy and federalism. The…

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Response to Alison MacDonald’s and Dapo Akande’s comments

We thank Alison MacDonald for her illuminating and extremely useful perspective on the developments in the approach of the British courts to adjudication based on international law. In many respects the changing attitude toward international law,  headed by the House of Lords under the unmistakable leadership of Lord Bingham, has provided an example for other national courts…

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