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Home Archive for category "EJIL: Live!"

New EJIL: Live! Interview with Jürgen Kurtz on his Article “Convergence and Divergence in International Economic Law and Politics”

Published on May 10, 2018        Author: 
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In this episode of EJIL: Live! the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal, Professor Joseph Weiler, speaks with Jürgen Kurtz, Professor of International Economic Law at the European University Institute, whose article “Convergence and Divergence in International Economic Law and Politics”, co-authored with Sungjoon Cho, Professor of Law at the Chicago-Kent College of Law, Illinois Institute of Technology, appears in issue 1 of volume 29 of the Journal.

The conversation takes up and deepens the issues explored in the article, noting in conclusion that the article’s very serious engagement on a doctrinal and policy level has ramifications which transcend the specific issue. The interview was recorded at the European University Institute.

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Reply to Dunoff and Pollack: ‘Experimenting with International Law’

Published on April 4, 2018        Author:  and
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In the last issue of the European Journal of International Law we published an experimental study on the ability of international law students and experts to ignore information in the context of treaty interpretation. The same issue included a follow-up article by Jeffrey Dunoff and Mark Pollack. We find Dunoff and Pollack’s practical exercise of critically reading experimental studies important and helpful in moving the broader methodological and theoretical concerns into a concrete discussion of actual studies. In the following sections, we will try to contribute to this effort by reflecting on their assessment of our study.

The Study

Before delving into Dunoff and Pollack’s discussion of our paper, we would like to briefly summarize our study, which one of us also summarized in this EJIL:Live! interview. Our study was designed to empirically test a notion that has been mentioned in the treaty interpretation literature, which suggests that it is practically impossible to ignore the content of preparatory work after exposure, even when a rule prohibits the use of such material. This notion is supported by studies on the difficulty of ignoring information in other legal contexts, such as exposure to inadmissible evidence. To test this notion’s validity, we conducted three experiments that examined the ability of international law students and experts to ignore information about preparatory work while interpreting treaties. Our findings indicate that experts are better able than students to ignore preparatory work when they believe that the Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties (VCLT) rules on treaty interpretation do not allow the use of such information. This suggests that there is something unique about international law expertise (or legal expertise in general) that enables the experts to resist the effect of exposure to such information. Read the rest of this entry…

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New EJIL: Live! Interview with Catherine O’Rourke on her Article “Feminist Strategy in International Law: Understanding Its Legal, Normative and Political Dimensions”

Published on March 10, 2018        Author: 
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In this episode of EJIL: Live! the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal, Professor Joseph Weiler, speaks with Catherine O’Rourke, Senior Lecturer in Human Rights and International Law at the Transitional Justice Institute and School of Law at Ulster University. Her article “Feminist Strategy in International Law: Understanding Its Legal, Normative and Political Dimensions” appears in issue 4 of volume 28 of the Journal. Rather than taking a specific problem and refracting it through gender and feminist concerns, this article constitutes a reflection on the field itself.

The conversation deepens that reflection, whilst offering fascinating insights on how and why the article came into being, how the study underlying the article was conducted and what kind of general lessons may be gleaned from it. The conversation concludes with some thoughts on how scholars may weave a feminist sensibility into a general international law course. The interview was recorded at the European University Institute.

 

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New EJIL: Live! Interview with Yahli Shereshevsky on his Article “Does Exposure to Preparatory Work Affect Treaty Interpretation? An Experimental Study on International Law Students and Experts”

Published on March 10, 2018        Author: 
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In this episode of EJIL: Live! the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal, Professor Joseph Weiler, speaks with Yahli Shereshevsky, Michigan Grotius Research Scholar at the University of Michigan Law School, whose article “Does Exposure to Preparatory Work Affect Treaty Interpretation? An Experimental Study on International Law Students and Experts”, co-authored with Tom Noah, PhD candidate in the Department of Psychology of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, appears in issue 4 of volume 28 of the Journal.

The conversation takes viewers behind the scenes of this experimental study, one of the first of its kind in the international law field, to provide a deeper understanding of the motivation behind the study and the methodology used by the authors. The conversation highlights the importance of the study, not only for its results but principally for its methodology and the potential it reveals for future studies. The interview was recorded at New York University.

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New EJIL: Live! Interview with Merris Amos on her Article “The Value of the European Court of Human Rights to the United Kingdom”

Published on December 7, 2017        Author: 
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In this episode of EJIL: Live! the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal, Professor Joseph Weiler, speaks with Professor Merris Amos of Queen Mary University of London, whose article “The Value of the European Court of Human Rights to the United Kingdom” appears as the first piece in the “Focus” section on Human Rights and the ECHR in issue 3 of volume 28 of the Journal.

Professor Amos takes up the challenge of articulating the value that the ECtHR adds to the objective of protecting human rights. Moving the focus from legitimacy, Professor Amos presents three different levels where the ECtHR adds value: individual, global and national. This serves as a framework for the discussion on the rise of negative sentiment towards the Council of Europe in the United Kingdom and introduces—as well as debating—the three levels of value added to the United Kingdom by the ECtHR. This conversation accompanies and expands on the article, including conjectures about the future of the European Convention on Human Rights in the United Kingdom.

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New EJIL:Live! Interview with Niels Petersen on his Article “The International Court of Justice and the Judicial Politics of Identifying Customary International Law”

Published on September 7, 2017        Author: 
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In this latest episode of EJIL: Live! the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal, Professor Joseph Weiler, speaks with Professor Niels Petersen of the University of Münster, whose article, “The International Court of Justice and the Judicial Politics of Identifying Customary International Law”, appears in Volume 28, Issue 2 of the journal.

In the article, Professor Petersen explores International Court of Justice decisions confirming the existence of customary international law.  The abstract of the article states that:

It is often observed in the literature on customary international law that the identification practice of the International Court of Justice (ICJ) for customary norms deviates from the traditional definition of customary law in Article 38 (1) lit. b of the ICJ Statute. However, while there are many normative and descriptive accounts on customary law and the Court’s practice, few studies try to explain the jurisprudence of the ICJ. This study aims at closing this gap. I argue that the ICJ’s argumentation pattern is due to the institutional constraints that the Court faces. In order for its decisions to be accepted, it has to signal impartiality through its reasoning. However, the analysis of state practice necessarily entails the selection of particular instances of practice, which could tarnish the image of an impartial court. In contrast, if the Court resorts to the consent of the parties or widely accepted international documents, it signals impartiality.

The EJIL:Live! discussion focuses on the principal empirical findings of the article, and Petersen’s novel conceptualization of those arguments in terms of “judicial politics”, explicable by the institutional constraints that the Court faces. This conversation offers a reflection on how this assessment of the jurisprudence could alter scholars’ normative conceptions of the Court’s decisions, particularly in regards to customary international law.

 

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New EJIL:Live! Interview with Liam Murphy on his Article “Law beyond the State: Some Philosophical Questions”

Published on April 29, 2017        Author: 
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In this episode of EJIL: Live! the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal, Professor Joseph Weiler, speaks with Professor Liam Murphy of New York University, whose article, “Law beyond the State: Some Philosophical Questions”, appears as the central piece in an EJIL: Debate! in Volume 28, Issue 1.

A legal philosopher, Professor Murphy takes up the challenge of exploring the realm of international law, an area largely ignored by Anglo-American legal philosophers since H.L.A Hart. Professor Murphy seeks to offer new perspectives on the famous chapter 10 of Hart’s The Concept of Law, and to critique the understanding of the international legal system set out therein. This then serves as the framework for his discussion of two core issues: the relevant grounds of law in international law – what factors are relevant in determining the content of law in force – and what makes international law a legal order. Professor Murphy also reflects on the Replies to his article, published in the same issue of the Journal, and how these prompted him to give further thought to the issues addressed in his article.

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New EJIL:Live! Interview with Philippe Sands on his New Book, East West Street: On the Origins of Genocide and Crimes Against Humanity

Published on January 23, 2017        Author: 
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In this episode of EJIL:Live! Professor Philippe Sands, whose article on “Reflections on International Judicialization” appears in EJIL vol. 27, no. 4, speaks with the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal, Professor Joseph Weiler. Unlike other editions of EJIL: Live!, this episode offers a fascinating and moving discussion of Sands’ remarkable new book, East West Street: On the Origins of Genocide and Crimes Against Humanity.

The conversation takes viewers along the many paths of research and discovery that Sands took in writing the book, beginning from a chance invitation to deliver a lecture in Lviv in 2010. In the conversation, as in the book, Sands explores the geographical “coincidence” of his own grandfather as well as Hersch Lauterpacht, founder of the concept of crimes against humanity, and Raphael Lemkin, who invented the concept of genocide, having their origins in the small town of Lviv. He notes that the big lesson he learnt from writing the book is that in order to understand the concepts we deal with in international law, we have to understand personal histories.

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New EJIL: Live! Interview with Simon Chesterman on Asia’s Ambivalence about International Law and Institutions: Past, Present and Futures

Published on January 19, 2017        Author: 
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A new episode of EJIL: Live!, the Journal’s official podcast, is now available. In this episode the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal, Professor Joseph Weiler, speaks with Professor Simon Chesterman, Dean and Professor at the National University of Singapore, about his article, “Asia’s Ambivalence about International Law and Institutions: Past, Present and Futures”, which appears in EJIL, Volume 27, Issue 4.

The conversation takes up the issues advanced by Chesterman in his article on Asia’s ambivalence to international law and institutions, and explores them further. Taking as its starting point the paradox of Asia benefiting most from international law and global governance institutions whilst remaining the least likely to participate in such institutions, the conversation looks at the historical and other reasons for this ambivalence and moves on to discuss possible futures for the involvement of Asian states in international law institutions.

The interview was recorded at the National University of Singapore.

 

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New EJIL:Live! Interview with Deborah Whitehall on A Rival History of Self-Determination

Published on November 11, 2016        Author: 
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In the latest episode of EJIL: Live!, the Associate Editor of the European Journal of International Law, Dr. Guy Fiti Sinclair, speaks with Dr. Deborah Whitehall, Lecturer at Monash University Faculty of Law, about her article titled “A Rival History of Self-Determination”, which appears in EJIL, Volume 27, Issue 3. The article examines Rosa Luxemburg’s views on self-determination. Dr. Whitehall talks about how Luxemburg’s background and biography influenced her views, how those views differed from the orthodox liberal (Wilsonian) and Leninist positions, and what studying Luxemburg can illuminate for international lawyers today.

We welcome comments and reactions to EJIL: Live!

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