EJIL Book Discussion

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Discussing Heller’s The Nuremberg Military Tribunals and the Origins of the International Criminal Law

Alexa Stiller is a Lecturer in the Department of History, University of Bern, Switzerland; e-mail: alexa.stiller [at] hist.unibe.ch Kevin Heller has written a very important book that provides the first comprehensive legal analysis of the Nuremberg Military Tribunals (NMTs). His main argument is that the twelve trials are of paramount historical importance, not only because they created a huge amount of documentary evidence of the crimes of the Third Reich but first and foremost because the tribunals played an important role in the development of international criminal law (and to make this clear from the outset, I absolutely agree with his assumption). Heller’s book is divided in five sections, each consisting of three chapters. Sections one and five, the origins of the NMT trials and the aftermath as well as their legacy, are the historical parts of the book, the middle sections are dedicated to a legal discussion of the Tribunals, the law and procedure, the jurisprudence, and the modes of participation and defenses that the Tribunals approved. Although Heller…

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A Comment on Kevin Heller’s Nuremberg Military Tribunals and the Origins of International Criminal Law

Michael R. Marrus is Chancellor Rose and Ray Wolfe Professor Emeritus of Holocaust Studies and Adjunct Professor of Law at the University of Toronto, and the author of The Nuremberg War Crimes Trial l945-46: A Documentary History (Bedford Books).  His most recent book is Some Measure of Justice: The Holocaust Era Restitution Campaign of the 1990s (Wisconsin).

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The Nuremberg Military Tribunals and the Origins of International Criminal Law

I am deeply grateful to both my co-bloggers at Opinio Juris and the editors of EJIL: Talk! – particularly my friends Marko Milanovic and Dapo Akande – for this remarkable opportunity to discuss my new book.  I look forward to hearing what the impressive, and frankly intimidating, group of commenters have to say about it. I wrote…

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Book Discussion: Kevin Jon Heller, Nuremberg Military Tribunals and the Origins of International Criminal Law

Opinio Juris and EJIL: Talk! are happy to announce that we will be doing two joint book discussions. The first book we will be discussing is Kevin Heller’s Nuremberg Military Tribunals and the Origins of International Criminal Law (Oxford UP) and that discussion starts today. We have a fantastic lineup of discussants, to whom we…

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Gallant on Legality and the Rome Statute

To my shame, I’ve only just noticed that Ken Gallant in his excellent book The Principle of Legality in International and Comparative Criminal Law (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2009) – recently reviewed in the JICJ here – addresses the difficult problem of applying the substantive law of the Rome Statute to situations in which the Court acquires…

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