EJIL Analysis

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Investment Treaties and EU law

Piet Eeckhout is Professor of Law and Director of the Centre for European Law at King's College London. In two parallel decisions of March of this year (Case C-249/06 Commission v Sweden and Case C-205/06 Commission v Austria) the European Court of Justice ruled that Sweden and Austria are in breach of their EC Treaty obligations by maintaining bilateral investment treaties with third countries which may interfere with the EU's powers to restrict capital movements.  This is the Court's first venture into the booming international investment law field.  It should be seen in its broader setting. The Treaty of Lisbon purports to extend the scope of the EU's common commercial policy to matters of "foreign direct investment".  Perhaps in anticipation of this significant expansion of Community competence, the Commission is becoming active in this area.  It considers that bilateral investment treaties between Member States and third countries are incompatible with Community law, in so far…

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Command Responsibility at the ICC and ICTY: In Two Minds on the Mental Element?

Professor Robert Cryer is Professor of International and Criminal Law at the University of Birmingham Law School, UK. He is the author of Prosecuting International Crimes: Selectivity and the International Criminal System (Cambridge, 2005) and co-author of An Introduction to International Criminal Law and Procedure (Cambridge, 2007).  One of the…

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The ICJ and Evolutionary Treaty Interpretation

On Monday, the ICJ delivered its judgment in the Costa Rica v. Nicaragua case, concerning navigational and related rights on the river San Juan (Registry summary; judgment). The case itself is not terribly important in the grand scheme of things, but upon reading the judgment I came across several questions of broader import that our readers might find…

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Response to Alison MacDonald’s and Dapo Akande’s comments

We thank Alison MacDonald for her illuminating and extremely useful perspective on the developments in the approach of the British courts to adjudication based on international law. In many respects the changing attitude toward international law,  headed by the House of Lords under the unmistakable leadership of Lord Bingham, has provided an example for other national courts…

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Three Cheers for the Application of International Law by Domestic Courts! Or should that be two? A response to Benvenisti & Downs.

Last month, Professors Eyal Benvenisti and George Downs posted a summary of their latest EJIL article - "National Courts, Domestic Democracy and the Evolution of International Law"  - which set out the issues discussed in that article (available here) in the context of the authors' scholarship in this area. The article impressively surveys trends regarding the extent to…

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