Weihuan Zhou

About/Bio

Dr Weihuan Zhou is Associate Professor and Co-Director of the China International Business and Economic Law (CIBEL) Centre at the Faculty of Law and Justice, University of New South Wales Sydney. His research explores the most current and controversial issues in the field of international economic law, particularly the nexus between international trade law and China. He has published widely in this field. His latest book, published by the Cambridge University Press, offers one of the first thorough and systemic analysis of China’s ongoing reforms of state-owned enterprises and the ways to tackle China’s state capitalism under the world trading system. His work has been cited widely, including in reports of the European Parliament, the Parliament of Australia, Australia’s Productivity Commission, US Congressional Research Services and World Economic Forum. Dr Zhou is currently co-Secretary of the Society of International Economic Law (SIEL) and editorial board member of the World Trade Review and the Journal of International Trade Law and Policy.

Recently Published

Sovereign White Knights: Defensive State-Capitalism as a Gate Keeper of (EU) Economic Security?

Geopolitical considerations have been creeping into corporate and international economic laws. Faced with rapidly increasing inbound foreign direct investment by corporations from competing economies, many countries have either strengthened existing, or developed new, investment screening mechanisms. These mechanisms enable host country governments to decide whether to admit foreign investment, and if so, whether conditions should be…

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Critical insecurities? The European Union’s trade and investment strategy for a stable supply of minerals for the green transition

Clashing over critical minerals The green transition is creating an exponential need for critical raw materials (“CRMs”), such as lithium, nickel and cobalt, as these are necessary for environmentally-friendly technologies, from wind turbines to electrical vehicles. The European Union (“EU”) is in desperate need of such minerals due to limited reserves at home and long-lasting…

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