Monica Hakimi

About/Bio

Monica Hakimi is a professor of law at the University of Michigan Law School. She teaches and writes on public international law and U.S. foreign relations law, with a particular focus on the informal ways in which international law adapts to contemporary challenges. Much of her research addresses that issue in the contexts of human rights law, the law of armed conflict, and the law governing the cross-border use of armed force. Professor Hakimi earned her JD from Yale Law School in 2001 and her BA, summa cum laude, from Duke University. Following law school, Professor Hakimi clerked for the Hon. Kimba Wood of the Southern District of New York and later served as an attorney-adviser in the Office of the Legal Adviser at the U.S. Department of State, where she counseled policymakers on non-proliferation, the reconstruction of Iraq, international investment disputes, and civil aviation. Follow Professor Hakimi on Twitter @MonicaHakimi.

Recently Published

International Law in “Turbulent Times,” Part I

Note from the Editors:  This week we hold the first EJIL:Talk! Contributing Editors' Debate, where some or all of our distinguished Contributing Editors lend their views on broad themes of international law and the state of the art, science, and discipline of international law.  Our thanks to Andreas Zimmermann (Co-Director of the Berlin-Potsdam Research Group, 'The…

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Macron’s Threat of Reprisals and the Jus ad Bellum

A few days ago, French President Macron reportedly said that the use of chemical weapons in Syria would cross a “red line” for France and result in reprisals. Macron’s statement comes less than two months after the United States conducted airstrikes against Syria for its use of chemical weapons. The vast majority of states…

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US Strikes against Syria and the Implications for the Jus ad Bellum

The blogosphere is abuzz with reactions to the U.S. strikes against Syria. My guess is that most international lawyers will agree with Marko Milanovic that the strikes were unlawful. Article 2(4) of the Charter prohibits the use of force by one state against another, except in self-defense or with the UN Security Council’s authorization. Neither…

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