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The Rise of Environmental Law in International Dispute Resolution: Inter-American Court of Human Rights issues Landmark Advisory Opinion on Environment and Human Rights

Published on February 26, 2018        Author:  and

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The Inter-American Court’s Advisory Opinion on Environment and Human Rights, released on 7 February 2018 (in Spanish only) (for brevity “AO”), is the latest and potentially most significant decision in a series of high profile international judicial rulings which acknowledge legal consequences for environmental harm. As recently as 2 February 2018, the International Court of Justice in the conjoined Costa Rica v. Nicaragua / Nicaragua v. Costa Rica cases ordered Nicaragua to pay compensation to Costa Rica for environmental damage, its first ever order for such compensation. Earlier, the ITLOS issued a landmark provisional measures order in Dispute Concerning Delimitation of the Maritime Boundary between Ghana and Côte d’Ivoire in the Atlantic Ocean (Ghana/Côte d’Ivoire) (Case 23), prescribing provisional measures protecting the marine environment, inter alia suspending all ongoing oil exploration and exploitation operations in a disputed area. To that list one could add the 2017 decision of an ICSID tribunal in Burlington Resources, Inc. v. Republic of Ecuador to award some US$39 million in damages in favour of Ecuador for environmental remediation costs.

The AO (summarized in EJIL: Talk! here) focuses on State obligations under international environmental law and human rights law in the transboundary context, in particular as concerns the construction and operation of infrastructure mega-projects, petroleum exploration and exploitation, maritime transportation of hydrocarbons, construction and enlargement of ports and shipping canals, and so on. 

The AO is ground-breaking in several respects. It is the IACtHR’s first pronouncement on State obligations concerning environmental protection under the ACHR (§ 46). Indeed, it is the first ruling ever by an international human rights court that truly examines environmental law as a systemic whole, as distinct from isolated examples of environmental harm analogous to private law nuisance claims (e.g. Lopez-Ostra v. Spain in the ECtHR). Perhaps most importantly, it is a landmark in the evolving jurisprudence on ‘diagonal’ human rights obligations, i.e. obligations capable of being invoked by individual or groups against States other than their own. The AO opens a door – albeit in a cautious and pragmatic way – to cross-border human rights claims arising from transboundary environmental impacts. Read the rest of this entry…

 

The South China Sea case: Chess Arbitration?

Published on August 10, 2016        Author: 

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This post looks into the wider questions The South China Sea recent award raises and its possible impact.   Looking back at the rare examples in international law in which States chose not to appear to participate in the proceedings, I address questions such as “what good is an award that cannot be enforced” and what role has arbitration in that context.  I argue that contrasting with conventional dispute resolution in which the award puts an end to a dispute, the award in the South China Sea case was neither an end in itself, nor necessarily an attempt to get leverage on the part of Philippines, to negotiate with China at bilateral level. After all, counsel for Philippines himself has argued that “bilateralized negotiations had failed”.  I argue that much like a chess-movement, the South China Sea case is rather the means for something else in a broader chess-like strategy: (a) as a brick on which other disputes can be built (b) to attempt the multilateralization of the dispute concerning the South China Sea, to involve all those countries with claims in respect of the disputed sovereignty and entitlements over the South China Sea.

Read the rest of this entry…

 

Extra-Territorial Claims in the “Spider’s Web” of the Law? UK Supreme Court Judgment in Ministry of Defence v Iraqi Civilians

Published on May 25, 2016        Author: 

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Over the past decade, the direction of travel of jurisprudence by English courts has significantly departed from an earlier position that considered the acts of the UK government in the exercise of foreign relations to be a non-justiciable area, and shifted towards scrutiny of the impact of UK foreign policy decisions on individuals (see Al Rawi v Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs [2008] QB 289; the Binyam Mohamed case, and more recently the discussion of crown act of state doctrine in Serdar Mohammed v Secretary of State for Defence). After all, as stated by Lord Sumption back in an address at the London School of Economics in 2012, “the acts of the executive are by definition justiciable in its own courts”. The most significant factor for such a shift, as Lord Sumption noted, was the enactment into English Law of the European Convention on Human Rights (“ECHR”).

Despite this shift in the judicial attitude with regard to review of acts of the executive in foreign affairs, jurisdictional issues (ratione temporis) and time bars are proving to be hurdles in the path of claimants bringing claims with regard to acts engaged in by the UK government extraterritorially. The recent Supreme Court decision in Keyu and others v Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs  [2015] UKSC 69 (“the Batang Kali massacre case” on which see this previous post) dealt with a temporal jurisdictional obstacle. The Supreme Court’s 12 May 2016 decision in Ministry of Defence (Respondent) v Iraqi Civilians (Appellant) [2016] UKSC 25 (“The Iraqi civilians case”) is another example of a hurdle faced by claimants, this time in the guise of a time bar.

While the Batang Kali massacre case was concerned with the Supreme Court’s interpretation of public international law rules, (quite centrally, with the duties Article 2 ECHR imposes on the UK in the context of inquiries), the decision in the Iraqi civilians case concerned English private international law, and turned on a point of interpretation of The Foreign Limitation Periods Act 1984.

In the Iraqi civilians case, the Supreme Court gave judgment in relation to 14 lead claimants (in claims by over 600 Iraqi citizens), who had alleged unlawful detention and/or physical maltreatment at the hands of British armed forces in Iraq between 2003 and 2009.

The Supreme Court held, applying Iraqi limitation law, that the claims of the Iraqi civilians in England were time-barred. It dismissed the appeal. This post addresses the central holding of this case. Read the rest of this entry…

 
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