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Whose Security is it Anyway? Towards a Treaty Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons

Published on May 31, 2016        Author: 
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On Friday, 13 May 2016, the UN’s Open Ended Working Group (OEWG), convened pursuant to UNGA resolution 70/33 (7 Dec 2015) and mandated, inter alia, to “substantively address concrete effective legal measures, legal provisions and norms that would need to be concluded to attain and maintain a world without nuclear weapons”, closed its second session with a majority of states calling for negotiations of a legally binding instrument (or instruments) to prohibit nuclear weapons to start in 2017.

Although (or perhaps because) the nuclear-armed states have chosen not to play ball, for the first time in decades, a treaty outlawing nuclear weapons is a real possibility. The OEWG, which will meet for a third time in August to agree on recommendations to the UNGA, and the ensuing tug-of-war in the UNGA’s First Committee in October, offer an historic opportunity for multilateral nuclear disarmament negotiations to take a big step forward. The reframing of nuclear disarmament as a humanitarian concern has been instrumental in generating strong momentum in support of negotiations. This post surveys some of the legal controversies that arose during the OEWG and explains why, from a humanitarian disarmament perspective, a treaty prohibition of nuclear weapons is both imperative and an effective disarmament measure, even without the participation of the nuclear-armed states.

Open to all, the OEWG’s May session has been attended by 100 states, as well as international organizations and civil society representatives, including survivors of the atomic bombings. None of the nuclear-armed states, i.e. the Nuclear Weapon States (NWS) recognized under the 1968 Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) –China, France, Russia, the UK and the US – nor the DPRK, India, Israel or Pakistan, participated, casting further doubt on the good faith performance of nuclear disarmament obligations by the respondents in the RMI cases pending before the ICJ.

There is general agreement that the ultimate objective is a world free of nuclear weapons. To that end, all states parties to the NPT (and arguably, all states) have a legal duty to “pursue negotiations in good faith on effective measures relating to cessation of the nuclear arms race at an early date and to nuclear disarmament” pursuant to Art. VI, NPT and customary international law. Views diverge, however, on the pathways, means and urgency with which this goal should be attained. Read the rest of this entry…

 

Use of Grad Rockets in Populated Areas: What Lessons from Gotovina?

Published on July 30, 2014        Author: 
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Maya Brehm PhotoMaya Brehm is a researcher in weapons law at the Geneva Academy of International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights (ADH) and a consultant with Article 36 and PAX. Her recent work focuses on the humanitarian impact of explosive weapon use in populated areas and on framing the policy debate on autonomous weapons systems.

In a recently published report, Human Rights Watch (HRW) documents harm to civilians from the use of 122mm Grad rockets apparently fired by Ukrainian government forces and pro-government militias into Donetsk and its suburbs. In four attacks investigated by HRW at least 16 civilians were killed and many more wounded. According to HRW insurgent forces also recently used Grad rockets. The image below from HRW shows attacks in and around Donetsk (click to enlarge). The organization has also posted a video online presenting its findings.

 The problem with Grad rocketsGrad rockets

Grad rockets are unguided rockets fired from a multiple-barrel rocket launcher (MBRL) that can deliver up to 40 rockets within a very short time to a range of 20 kilometers. Like other unguided, indirect fire  weapons, Grad rockets are considered ‘area weapons’, suited for attacks against targets of significant dimensions, because due to ballistic and other factors, the area over which the rockets can spread out is relatively wide.

The dimension of the area affected by a rocket attack (the area of potential impact of the rockets combined with the blast/fragmentation zones of the individual rockets) is a function of many variables, including fuzing, ballistic and firing technique-related factors. As that area can be very wide, the use of Grad rockets in populated areas carries a high risk of harm to civilians. Read the rest of this entry…

 
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