Gian Luca Burci

About/Bio

Gian Luca Burci is Adjunct Professor of international law at the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies, Geneva since 2012. He is also the Director of the joint LLM on Global Health Law and Governance between the Graduate Institute and Georgetown Law School. Before is appointment he served in the Legal Office of the World Health Organization from 1998 to 2016 and was its Legal Counsel from 2005 to 2016. Professor Burci previously worked in the International Atomic Energy Agency (1998-1999) and the Office of the UN Legal Counsel (1999-2008). His courses include the law of international organizations and global health law. While in WHO, he was involved in the negotiation and implementation of the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, the revision and implementation of the International Health Regulations, WHO’s response to the 2014-2016 Ebola outbreak and WHO reform. Prof. Burci holds a post graduate degree in law from the University of Genova, Italy. His areas of expertise are public international law, the law of international organizations as well as global health governance and law. Prof. Burci is the co-author of the leading English book on WHO, editor of the first research collection on global health law, co-editor of the first research handbook on global health law and author of numerous articles and book chapters.

Recently Published

The USA and the World Health Organization: What has President Trump actually decided and what are its consequences?

On Friday 29 May 2020, during a press statement denouncing China’s alleged “total control” of WHO, President Trump declared that “because they [WHO] have failed to make the requested and greatly needed reforms, we will be today terminating our relationship with the World Health Organization and redirecting those funds to other worldwide and deserving, urgent global public health…

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The Outbreak of COVID-19 Coronavirus: are the International Health Regulations fit for purpose?

  The outbreak of coronavirus first detected in December 2019 in Wuhan, China (COVID-19 in WHO’s parlance) has taken the world by surprise and confirmed our shared global vulnerability to the appearance of new pathogens, in particular airborne viruses that spread easily through travel and social proximity. As of 25 February 2020, China had reported more than 77…

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