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Passportisation: Risks for International Law and Stability – Response to Anne Peters

Published on May 30, 2019        Author: 

Introduction

Anne Peters’ EJIL Talk! blog post Passportization: Risks for International Law and Stability regarding actions of the Russian Federation as regards applications for Russian nationality for persons living in certain parts of Ukraine (see here and here) raises important and interesting questions. With respect I believe that (i) the post overstates the assistance available from the international law concerned directly with nationality, (ii) evaluating the extent of that law is a worthwhile endeavour, and (iii) something like Prof Dr Peters’ final conclusion may be ultimately reached by a different route, by reference not to the particular principles related to nationality in international law but to the actions of the Russian Federation taken in their overall factual context.

International law re nationality: background

Nationality is closely linked to sovereignty, and nationality issues may well become a source of conflict between or amongst States. Since the Advisory Opinion of the Permanent Court of International Justice in Nationality Decrees Issued in Tunis and Morocco on 8 November 1921, Advisory Opinion, 1923, PCIJ (ser B) No 4 (7 February 1923) questions regarding nationality are no longer considered, as was often the case earlier, to lie exclusively within the ambit of each State. The 1930 Convention on Certain Questions Relating to the Conflict of Nationality Laws records respectively at article 1 that:

It is for each State to determine under its own law who are its nationals’ and that nationality ‘shall be recognised by other Statesso far as it is consistent with international conventions, international custom, and the principles of law generally recognised with regard to nationality.

By article 2:

Any question as to whether a person possesses the nationality of a particular State shall be determined in accordance with the law of the State.

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Filed under: Human Rights
 
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