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Home Articles posted by Kei Hannah Brodersen and Lysandre Papadopoulos

Guilty but Free: The ICC Renders its First Contempt Case Judgment

hOn 19 October 2016, the Trial Chamber VII of the International Criminal Court issued its verdict in the case The Prosecutor v Jean-Pierre Bemba Gobo, Aimé Kilolo Musamba, Jean-Jacques Mangenda Kabongo, Fidèle Babala Wandu, Narcisse Arido (Bemba et al.) – the ICC’s first contempt case.

The five men had been accused of offences against the administration of justice under Article 70 of the Rome Statute (RS) in the Main Case against Jean-Pierre Bemba. They were (to different degrees) found guilty by the Chamber for corruptly influencing 14 defence witnesses in the Main Case, presenting false evidence, and giving false testimony when under an obligation to tell the truth. Mr Bemba (the accused in the Main Case), his lawyer Mr Kilolo, Bemba’s defence team’s case manager Mr Mangenda, Mr Babala, a political ally of Bemba’s, and Mr Arido, Bemba’s financier, had briefed the witnesses, provided them with false testimonies, payed them and promised them relocation to Europe if they testified in Bemba’s favour.

Attending the hearing on Wednesday 19 October, the authors of this post did not expect to see more than a normal delivery of judgment. Eventually, however, we listened to a vivid argument on whether to remand in custody of the ICC’s detention centre the accused Mr Kilolo, Mr Mangenda, Mr Babala and Mr Arido, while awaiting their sentencing judgment. Bemba, having been sentenced to 18 years of imprisonment in the Main Case, is in custody anyway. Both, the Prosecution and the Defence presented their arguments as to whether detention was appropriate and allowed by law, in which the latter deplored – through a noteworthy “we do not dine with the judges” – that, unlike the judges, they had not been informed of the Prosecution’s intention to file this application. Eventually, the Chamber rejected the application, relying on its assessment that there was no risk that the four accused wouldn’t show up to any subsequent Court meeting.

This post examines the issues mentioned during the discussion between the Prosecution and the Defence. It seeks to clarify in which circumstances an accused can be detained after a conviction, although a sentence has not yet been pronounced. Read the rest of this entry…

 
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