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Home Articles posted by Sean Aughey & Aurel Sari

The Authority to Detain in NIACs Revisited: Serdar Mohammed in the Court of Appeal

Published on August 5, 2015        Author: 

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As the English Court of Appeal breaks for the summer vacation, scores of international lawyers are about to descend on one of its latest decisions: Mohammed v Secretary of State for Defence; Rahmatullah and Ors v MoD and FCO [2015] EWCA Civ 843. In this 109-page long judgment, the Court upholds the conclusion reached at first instance by Leggatt J that British armed forces participating in ISAF lacked the legal authority under international law to detain suspected insurgents captured in Afghanistan.

The implications of Serdar Mohammed are considerable. The case raises difficult questions about the place the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR) occupies in the international legal order and, more broadly, about the relationship between international human rights law and international humanitarian law (IHL). Those who have followed this debate will recall that we were not convinced by Leggatt J’s reasoning on these points (see here, here and here). In so far as it upholds his main conclusions, we also find ourselves in disagreement with the judgment now delivered by the Court of Appeal. Rather than rehearsing our arguments on the underlying issues in full (see in detail here), in this post we would like to briefly comment on those aspects of the Court’s decision which, in our view, take the debate forward and those which do not. Read the rest of this entry…

 

IHL Does Authorize Detention in NIAC: A Rejoinder to Rogier Bartels

Published on February 24, 2015        Author: 

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We are grateful to Rogier Bartels for his thoughtful comments on our recent post and article in which we argue that IHL authorizes State parties to a NIAC to detain suspected insurgents. In this rejoinder, we briefly respond to Rogier’s main criticisms of our argument.

Equal protection versus equal status

The crux of Rogier’s criticism flows from his understanding of what the principle of equal application requires. For Rogier—as well as for Leggatt J in Serdar Mohammed and Dapo Akande and Lawrence Hill-Cawthorne (see here and here) —‘a principle of IHL has to apply equally to all sides; otherwise it cannot be a principle’. All parties to a NIAC, both States and non-state actors, must have exactly the same rights (including authorities) and obligations under IHL. Thus, our position that IHL authorizes States (but not organized armed groups) to detain produces unacceptably ‘asymmetrical rules’.

As we explain in our article, this ‘symmetry’ objection stretches the principle of equal application beyond its breaking point:

If the principle [of equal application] demands that all belligerents must enjoy the same status and rights and CA3 does not confer the full panoply of belligerent status and rights on non-State actors, then the only logical conclusion is that the parties to the Geneva Conventions and AP II gave up their status and rights as States and assumed the same status and rights as non-State actors. This not only contradicts commonsense, but also the plain language of CA3, which declares that it does not affect the legal status of the parties, State and non-State alike, to the conflict. In fact, CA3 thereby conserves any pre-existing inequality between the belligerent status and rights of State and non-State parties to a NIAC.

The principle of equal application requires that the protections and obligations under IHL apply to all parties to an IAC or NIAC whatever the lawfulness of resort to force under the jus ad bellum. Entitlement to protection is not dependent on how the conflict began or the relative justice of the causes involved. Similarly, the scope of IHL obligations should not be linked to organizational capacities or military rationales. However, none of this alters the fact that there is an undeniable asymmetry in the status of parties to a NIAC. One is a State and the other is not. The fact that an internal situation rises to the level of a NIAC does not transform the State party into a non-State actor or vice versa. As René Provost notes in his comments on the debate between Marco Sassòli and Yuval Shany referred to by Rogier: Read the rest of this entry…

 

IHL Does Authorise Detention in NIAC: What the Sceptics Get Wrong

Published on February 11, 2015        Author: 

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As Serdar Mohammed v Ministry of Defence hits the English Court of Appeal, the blogs have lit up with comments, criticisms and predictions. In recent posts published at Just Security and Opinio Juris, Ryan Goodman, Kevin Jon Heller and Jonathan Horowitz (see here, here and here) have joined with Marko Milanovic and Lawrence Cawthorne-Hill and Dapo Akande (see here, here and here) in defending the view that IHL does not provide States with a legal authority to detain persons in a non-international armed conflict (NIAC). In this post, we wish to outline our challenge to this proposition as mistaken in law and undesirable as a matter of policy (for a more detailed version of our argument, see our recent article in International Law Studies here).

The nature of the law of war

In Serdar Mohammed, Mr Justice Leggatt relied on five arguments to deny the existence of a legal authority to detain under IHL in NIACs (paras 228–251). Despite his meticulous analysis, we do not find the reasoning persuasive. None of the five arguments exclude the possibility that a legal basis for detention exists under customary international law. Even if correct, they establish only the absence of an implicit legal basis under Common Article 3 (CA3) of the Geneva Conventions of 1949 and the relevant provisions of Additional Protocol II of 1977 (AP II). However, Leggatt J’s reading of these provisions is too narrow. In particular, it misconstrues the nature and purpose of IHL as a body of law.

According to Leggatt J, the purely humanitarian purpose pursued by CA3 and AP II is inconsistent with the idea that they were designed to confer a legal power of detention (para. 244). Although humanitarian imperatives have played a central role in the development of modern IHL, they have never been its sole preoccupation. Its other purpose has always been the regulation of hostilities. Focusing on the humanitarian aspects of IHL at the expense of its warfighting dimension ignores its fundamentally dual character. In particular, it fails to appreciate the role played by the principle of military necessity. As Nils Melzer has explained, the ‘aim of military necessity as a principle of law has always been to provide a realistic standard of conduct by permitting those measures of warfare that are reasonably required for the effective conduct of hostilities, while at the same time prohibiting the infliction of unnecessary suffering, injury and destruction’ (Melzer, Targeted Killing in International Law, 279–280). The principle therefore serves both a restrictive and a permissive function. Read the rest of this entry…