Anthea Roberts

About/Bio

Anthea Roberts is a Professor at School of Regulation and Global Governance (RegNet) at the Australian National University and a Visiting Professor for the Masters of International Dispute Settlement at the Graduate Institute and the University of Geneva. Anthea attends UNCITRAL Working Group III as part of the Australian delegation but she acts and writes in her independent academic capacity. She is a specialist in public international law, investment treaty law and arbitration, comparative international law and geoeconomics. Prior to joining the ANU, Anthea taught at the London School of Economics, Columbia Law School and Harvard Law School. She is serving or has served on the editorial boards of the American Journal of International Law, the European Journal of International Law, the Journal of World Trade and Investment and ICSID Review. She is also a Contributing Editor for EJIL: Talk! and International Economic and Policy Law Blog and a Reporter for the Restatement (Fourth) of the Foreign Relations Law of the United States. Follow Anthea on @AntheaERoberts.

Recently Published

UNCITRAL and ISDS Reform (Hybrid): Season 5 – Watching the Grass Grow

Watching UNCITRAL Working Group III over the years has been a bit like viewing a long-running television series. The beginning of the process was exciting as we met a compelling cast of characters and the plot line began to take shape. Sometimes there was high drama: Which actors would support which kinds of reforms? Which ones would oppose…

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UNCITRAL and ISDS Reform (Online): Crossing the Chasm

To text or not to text? That is the question. Or, rather, that was the question at UNCITRAL when Working Group III resumed its deliberations online last week. The Working Group’s focus was structural reforms, first selection and appointment of permanent or fixed-term adjudicators, then an appellate mechanism. As readers of this series know well, states hold different…

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UNCITRAL and ISDS Reform (Online): Can You Hear Me Now?

‘Can you hear me now?’ is a question that the delegates of Working Group III asked each other often last week, as negotiations on ISDS reform continued but were, for the first time, online. Moving online means that negotiators are also facing many other new questions. How do you keep momentum going? Does moving online mean more governments and…

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