Anne Peters

About/Bio

Anne Peters is Director at the Max Planck Institute for Comparative Public Law and International Law Heidelberg (Germany) and a professor of international law at the universities of Basel (Switzerland), Heidelberg and Berlin (Germany). She was member (substitute) of the European Commission for Democracy through Law (Venice Commission) in respect of Germany (2011-2015) and served as the President of the European Society of International Law (2010-2012). Born in Berlin in 1964, Anne studied at the universities of Würzburg, Lausanne, Freiburg, and Harvard. Books (authored and co-edited) include: Beyond Human Rights (CUP 2016); Transparency in International Law (CUP 2013); Oxford Handbook of the History of International Law (OUP 2012); Conflict of Interest in Global, Public and Corporate Governance (CUP 2012); The Constitutionalization of International Law (OUP 2011); Non-state Actors as Standard Setters (CUP 2009); Women, Quotas and Constitutions (Kluwer 1999).

Recently Published

The Constitutionalization of International Law: A rejoinder

Editor's Note: This post continues our discussion of Klabbers, Peters & Ulfstein, The Constitutionalization of International Law. In this post Prof. Peters responds to earlier posts by Professors Dunoff and Trachtman , Steven Wheatley, Jean Cohen, and  Dan Bodansky. It is an honour to receive comments by distinguished experts on…

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The Constitutionalization of International Law: Conclusions

Chapter 7  of The Constitutionalization of International Law discusses the pros and cons of the constitutionalist paradigm. Critics of global constitutionalism doubt the empirical reality of the phenomenon called constitutionalization, call into question the analytic value of constitutionalism as an academic approach, and fear that the discourse is in normative terms dangerous. The chapter counters these objections.

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Dual Democracy

This post summarises the ideas in Chapter 6of Klabbers, Peters & Ulfstein, The Constitutionalization of International Law. 1. Overview of the Argument Global governance is undemocratic even under a modest standard. The deficits lie in the institutional design of the international organizations and bodies themselves, they result from the way states are integrated…

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