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Home Announcements and Events Announcements: CfP CCSI Yearbook on International Investment Law and Policy; CfP ASIL IOIG Workshop; CfP ILA-ASIL Asia-Pacific Research Forum; CfP It Takes Two to Tango

Announcements: CfP CCSI Yearbook on International Investment Law and Policy; CfP ASIL IOIG Workshop; CfP ILA-ASIL Asia-Pacific Research Forum; CfP It Takes Two to Tango

Published on November 18, 2018        Author: 
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1. Call for Papers: CCSI Yearbook on International Investment Law and Policy. The Columbia Center on Sustainable Investment (CCSI) is pleased to announce a call for papers for the edition of the Yearbook on International Investment Law and Policy covering 2018. The Yearbook is published by Oxford University Press (OUP) in hardcopy, as an ebook, and as part of OUP’s Investment Claims online service. The Yearbook monitors current developments in international investment law and policy. Beginning with the 2017 edition, Part One will include short pieces providing succinct overviews of recent developments and trends in international investment treaties and treaty policy; investor-state dispute settlement; institutional developments; and developments relevant to particular regions or countries. Part Two continues to include detailed analyses or short think pieces on central thematic issues in the contemporary discussions on international investment law and policy. All papers must be original texts and are subject to double-blind peer review. Original contributions to be considered for publication in the Yearbook are accepted on a rolling basis until 1 February 2019; please send submissions to Lisa Sachs (lsachs1 {at} law.columbia(.)edu). Further information can be found on CCSI’s website.
 
2. Call for Papers: ASIL IOIG Workshop. The International Organizations Interest Group (IOIG) of the American Society of International Law (ASIL) welcomes abstract submissions for its biennial work-in-progress workshop, to be held on Friday 15 March 2019 at Seton Hall School of Law in Newark, NJ. Please submit your abstract of an unpublished paper in the field of international organizations by 1 December 2018 at ioig {at} asil(.)org
 
3. Call for Papers: 2019 ILA-ASIL Asia-Pacific Research Forum, Taipei . The Chinese (Taiwan) Society of International Law will hold the ILA-ASIL Asia-Pacific Research Forum on 17 – 18 May 2019 at Howard Civil Service International House in Taipei, Taiwan, ROC. The theme of the Research Forum is “International Law and Emerging Powers: New Policy Challenges in the Asia-Pacific.” The Research Forum will feature two keynote speakers: Dr Christopher Ward SC, President of the ILA and Justice Chang-fa Lo of the ROC Constitutional Court. Paper proposals must be submitted to ila {at} nccu.edu(.)tw. Selected papers will be published in the Chinese (Taiwan) Yearbook of International Law and Affairs. The call for paper is available at the Research Forum website. Members of the organizing committee include Professors Chun-i Chen, Weixia Gu, Pasha Hsieh, Nigel Li, Torsten Stein, Lisa Toohey and Pei-Lun Tsai. The deadline for submissions is 10 December 2018. 

 
4. Call for Papers: It Takes Two to Tango – The Preliminary Reference Dance Between the Court of Justice of the European Union and National Courts. This conference takes place on Friday 14 June 2019, in Nijmegen (NL). The recent years have been marked by some high-profile cases, including the Danish Ajos case, the Italian Taricco saga as well as the German Gauweiler controversy, that brought some problematic features of the preliminary ruling procedure to the surface. The question these high profile cases are merely the tip of the iceberg, or the exceptions that prove the rule that the preliminary ruling procedure is generally working well? One might also wonder what (high) implementation rates tell us about the “true” ideas of national court judges about their interaction with the CJEU. Given the identified problems and in the light of the gap in the literature, it is important to examine various questions. Why and how do national courts use the preliminary ruling procedure and engage with the CJEU? More specifically, what are judges’ (individual) motives to refer or not to refer? How are the requested CJEU’s rulings received and implemented by national courts? An extended abstract (400-600 words) and a CV should be submitted for review to j.krommendijk {at} jur.ru(.)nl. The deadline for submissions is 1 January 2019. For more information, see here.  

 

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