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Do the containment measures taken by Italy in relation to COVID-19 comply with human rights law?

Italians, like the citizens of other democratic countries in times of peace, have learned to take for granted certain civil liberties and freedoms, such as the freedom of movement and assembly. It suddenly became evident to them that the enjoyment of these rights can be limited as the country has now been put on lockdown by the government, in an attempt to contain the spread of COVID-19, a disease caused by a new coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2).
This post will enquire about the compatibility of the containment measures taken by the Italian government with Italy’s obligations under human rights law, and particularly with the European Convention on Human Rigths (ECHR) and with the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR). While there are many human rights dimensions relevant to the issue of combating the spread of COVID-19, this post is limited to showing that the measures taken by the Italian government are so far compatible with human rights law. The myth that strict containment measures cannot be adopted in a democratic society should thus not be used as an excuse to avoid taking similar steps elsewhere to stop the COVID-19 pandemic.
COVID-19 and the necessity of containment measures
COVID-19 is a disease caused by a new coronavirus, which entails mostly respiratory symptoms. Human-to-human transmission of the disease occurs through the droplets released from the nose or mouth of an infected person. The first cases of COVID-19 were reported in the Hubei province in China in December 2019. In early January 2020, China notified the WHO about the outbreak and by the end of the month China was taking strict measures aimed at its containment, and including the complete sealing off of entire cities, the closure of businesses and schools, and prohibitions of travel and going outdoors.
Do the containment measures taken by Italy in relation to COVID-19 comply with human rights law?