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ICTY Appeals Chamber Reverses Stanisic and Simatovic Acquittal, Orders Retrial, Kills Off Specific Direction (Again!)

Published on December 15, 2015        Author: 

Today the Appeals Chamber of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia quashed the acquittal at trial of Jovica Stanisic and Franko Simatovic, the former head and deputy head of the Serbian secret police during the Milosevic regime, for crimes committed in Bosnia and Croatia. This is a big deal – S&S is the only remaining case tying the leadership of Serbia with crimes committed by Bosnian and Croatian Serbs. The trial judgment (itself delivered by a majority) was quashed on two grounds: that the Trial Chamber failed to properly reason its decision regarding the participation of the accused in a joint criminal enterprise, in particular because it could not analyse their mens rea without determining the actus reus of the JCE, and because it committed an error of law regarding the actus reus of aiding and abetting liability. (Appeals judgment here, press release and summary here.)

This latter point is one that will be familiar to our readers, as it is the (final?) nail in the coffin for the whole specific direction saga that we extensively covered on the blog (see here and here). As I explained in my earlier post, the ICTY Appeals Chamber went through an episode of self-fragmentation, with the Sainovic AC overruling the Perisic AC’s finding that specific direction was an element of the actus reus of aiding and abetting. As I also explained in that post, the outcome of S&S with respect to the specific direction point would essentially be determined by the composition of the Appeals Chamber in that case. That’s exactly what happened, with the S&S AC upholding the Sainovic rejection of specific direction by 3 votes to 2. The three votes in the majority were all judges who formed the Sainovic AC majority (Pocar, Liu, Ramaroson), while of the two judges in dissent one (Agius) was in the Perisic majority and the other (Afande) was not involved in the prior cases, and was hence the only unknown quantity.

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The Continued Failure to Implement Hirst v UK

Published on December 15, 2015        Author: 

It is over a decade now since the European Court of Human Rights delivered Hirst v United Kingdom (6 October 2005), ruling that the UK’s blanket (legislative) ban on convicted prisoners voting breached Art 3 of Protocol 1 to the European Convention on Human Rights (hereafter, the ‘Convention’). Five years ago, in Greens and MT v UK (23 Nov 2010), the Court ordered the UK to table Convention-compliant legislative proposals to secure compliance with Hirst. This resulted in a Report of a special Joint Committee of the UK Parliament (the Report of the Joint Committee on the Draft Prisoner Voting (Eligibility) Bill (16 December 2013)), which concluded that the law reform required to secure compliance with the Convention was comparatively minor and agreed that there were sound reasons to amend the law and proposed specific ways forward.

Two years on and the UK government has done no more than acknowledge the Report, which Parliament has not considered. With the law still not amended, on 9 December 2015 a further milestone in the chronology of prisoner voting saga occurred when the Committee of Ministers passed a second interim resolution highly critical of the UK’s inaction. The Daily Telegraph has reported this as a victory for the UK, although, in fact, the Committee of Ministers will return to the matter in December 2016.

This post discusses and criticises the reasons for inaction and non-compliance supplied by the Michael Gove (Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice) when he appeared before the House of Lords’ Select Committee on the Constitution on 2 December 2015 (Q 11, pp17-18 [unrevised version]).

When pressed for answers on the prisoner voting issue, Mr Gove conceded that the Joint Committee on the Draft Prisoner Voting (Eligibility) Bill’s (hereafter the ‘Joint Committee’) Report ‘absolutely’ ‘deserve[d] in due course a fuller answer’. Nevertheless, he would not commit to when this would be, other than to say that it would be ‘after’ the publication of the consultation document on a proposed UK Bill of Rights (replacing the Human Rights Act 1998), which is to be expected in the new year. Read the rest of this entry…

 

Strange Angel: Some Reflections on War

Published on December 14, 2015        Author: 

The philosopher and cultural critic Walter Benjamin owned a print, Angelus novus, by Paul Klee. In his essay, Theses on the philosophy of history, Benjamin’s Ninth Thesis recalled that it depicted:

An angel…who looks as though he were about to distance himself from something which he is staring at. His eyes are opened wide, his mouth stands open and his wings are outstretched. The Angel of History must look just so. His face is turned towards the past. Where we see the appearance of a chain of events, he sees one single catastrophe, which unceasingly piles rubble on top of rubble and hurls it before his feet. He would like to pause for a moment…to awaken the dead and to piece together what has been smashed. But a storm is blowing from Paradise, it has caught itself up in his wings and is so strong that the Angel can no longer close them. The storm drives him irresistibly into the future, to which his back is turned, while the rubble-heap before him grows sky-high. That which we call progress, is this storm.

This image and idea has been influential in philosophy and culture, for example, check out this song by Laurie Anderson.

A while ago, I was asked to write some reflections on war and international law. Deadlines whooshed past, but it is finally finished. International law, at least traditionally, saw war and peace as mutually exclusive—“there is no middle ground between war and peace” (Grotius, De iure belli ac pacis (1625) Book III, Ch.XXI, 1), although this dichotomy predated Grotius by centuries. At least since the end of the First World War, peace has been seen as the normal condition in international relations, with war characterised as an abnormal state of affairs. But what is the function of war in the international community? Read the rest of this entry…

 
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France Derogates from ECHR in the Wake of the Paris Attacks

Published on December 13, 2015        Author: 

On 24 November, France filed a formal notice of derogation from the European Convention on Human Rights with the Secretary-General of the Council of Europe. The notice is available here (and is reproduced in full below), while the French legislation referred to in the notice is available here. As far as I could tell from the UNTC website, France has not (yet) derogated from the ICCPR. The state of emergency in France has been used even with respect to issues that have no bearing on terrorism, for example to curb climate change protests in Paris. The emergency powers have been criticised on civil liberties grounds, e.g. by Human Rights Watch. It seems likely that they will be at issue in litigation before French domestic courts and before the European Court in Strasbourg. In that regard, the derogation notice is remarkably vague and unhelpful, merely stating that some of the emergency measures ‘may involve a derogation from the obligations’ under the ECHR, without explaining which measures exactly do, in fact, require a derogation and to what extent, let alone why precisely were those specific measures strictly required by the exigencies of the situation. What Strasbourg will make of this rather pro forma derogation if and when a relevant case comes before it is anyone’s guess.

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Announcements: RGSL Seeking New Rector; Chatham House Event; Ethiopian Yearbook of International Law; UN Audiovisual Library of International Law

Published on December 13, 2015        Author: 

1. RGSL Seeking New Rector. Riga Graduate School of Law (RGSL) is seeking candidates for the position of Rector. The position requires residence in Riga and is offered for a three year period with the possibility of renewal. The Rector is responsible for the academic management of the School and shall contribute to its further growth and strategic development. See here for further details, including the main tasks and responsibilities of the position and qualifications required. Applications are required by no later than 15 January 2016. For further information, contact Karina Kulberga, Director of RGSL: karina.kulberga {at} rgsl.edu(.)lv.

2. Chatham House Event. The International Law Programme at Chatham House will be hosting a meeting on ‘Shaping the Law: Civil Society Influence at International Criminal Courts’ on 25 January 2016 at Doughty Street Chambers. The meeting will consider the role of civil society interventions in proceedings concerning international criminal justice. For further details and to enquire about registering see here.

3. The Ethiopian Yearbook of International Law. The Ethiopian Yearbook of International Law (EtYIL) is a peer-reviewed academic journal that publishes scholarly works of the highest standard in the field of international law broadly defined, but with a focus on Ethiopia and the Horn of Africa region. For more information please see here. The first edition of the EtYIL is due for publication in 2016. It is a pleasure to invite you to submit ideas, abstracts and manuscripts for the 2017 edition of the Yearbook. To do so please contact the Editorial Team at  ethiopianyearbook {at} gmail(.)com. Read the rest of this entry…

Filed under: Announcements and Events
 
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The United Kingdom Ministerial Code and International Law: A Response to Richard Ekins and Guglielmo Verdirame

Published on December 11, 2015        Author: 

Until very recently, little attention had been paid by academic international lawyers to the United Kingdom’s Ministerial Code (though see this discussion of the role of the Code with respect to legal advice relating to the Iraq War of 2003). The Code, is a document issued by the Cabinet Office, but effectively by the Prime Minister. It sets out the standards of conduct expected of ministers with respect to the discharge of their duties. As was recently stated in this House of Commons Briefing Paper on the Code [p.3],”It has become the convention for the Code to be released at the beginning of a new administration and at a new Parliament.” Paragraph 1.2 of the 2010 version of the Code (as well as some earlier versions) stated that the Code was to be read against “the background of overarching duty on Ministers to comply with the law including international law and treaty obligations . . .” However, in October 2015, Paragraph 1.2 was changed to state that: “The Ministerial Code should be read against the background of the overarching duty on Ministers to comply with the law . . .” without any reference to international law or treaty obligations. Much has been written in the British media and in legal blogs about this change (see here for posts on the UK Constitutional Law blog and here, here and here for pieces in the Guardian and on the BBC).

This post responds to just one of the pieces that have been written in support of the change. We argue that the position set out in the piece by our colleagues, Richard Ekins and Guglielmo Verdirame (and in a twin piece by the same authors) misconceives the role of the reference to international law in the previous version of the Ministerial Code; misunderstands the relevance of international law to the rule of law; and goes too far in drawing a distinction between the binding force of international law on the state and on state officials. Read the rest of this entry…

 

Trade Agreements, EU Law, and Occupied Territories (2): The General Court Judgment in Frente Polisario v Council and the Protection of Fundamental Rights Abroad

Published on December 11, 2015        Author: 

This is a follow-up to my July post on Action for Annulment Frente Polisario v Council (Case T-512/12), a case before the General Court of the European Union (GC) in which Frente Polisario – the National Liberation Movement for Western Sahara – seeks the Annulment of the EU Council decision adopting the 2010 EU-Morocco Agreement on agricultural, processed agricultural and fisheries products. The GC delivered its judgment yesterday, both recognizing the standing of Frente Polisario and granting the (partial) annulment of the decision, with implications for EU-Morocco relations and for EU external relations law more broadly.

(1) Standing of Frente Polisario under Article 263 TFEU

As regards standing, the most striking aspect of the judgment is that the Court accepted the Frente’s entitlement to plead as a ‘moral person’, with the ‘necessary autonomy’ to challenge a decision of the EU legislator (paras. 50-53), without reference to the sui generis character of Frente Polisario or to the unique situation of Western Sahara. This would seem to open the door for other ‘autonomous entities’, even those with no claim to international legal personality, to challenge EU decisions under Article 263 TFEU.

By the same token, the Court fell short of recognizing the Frente’s legal personality under international law. Read the rest of this entry…

 

“Legitimized Self-Defense” – Quo Vadis Security Council?

Published on December 10, 2015        Author: 

I submit that United Nations Security Council (UNSC) resolution 2249 (2015) is – at least de facto – another step towards a reconfiguration of the UN collective security system. The call upon UN members to take “all necessary measures” has to be seen in the context of the self-defense narrative employed by most states forming the “Global Coalition to Counter ISIL” to justify their operations. Irrespective of the resolution’s ambiguity, it is hardly doubtful that it de facto yields a legitimizing effect for this narrative, inevitably endorsing it – even if the term “self-defense” is not mentioned once. Against this background, it seems that the UNSC actually assists in installing self-defense measures as a substitute for collective action under Chapter VII of the UN Charter (UNC). This recalibration of the UNSC’s role in the context of the use of force deserves a second thought. Self-defense is – irrespective of the legality of its invocation in specific cases de lege lata – hardly the right tool to deal with the global and permanent threat of terrorism.

As has already been excellently illustrated by Dapo Akande and Marko Milanovic, the resolution’s main characteristic is its ambiguity (see EJIL talk! Blog). Its vagueness is obviously the result of political necessities and compromise. In my view, however, interpreting the resolution from the perspective of an objective observer, it is clear that the UNSC did not authorize measures based on Art. 39 et seq. of the UNC. It is true that the term “necessary measures” is generally connoted with the authorization of force. It is likewise true that the preamble of the resolution which classifies “terrorism in all forms and manifestations” as “threats to international peace and security” alludes to the wording of Art. 39 UNC. But any “authorizing” tenor is neutralized by the clauses “calls upon” and “in compliance with international law, in particular with the United Nations Charter […].” The UNSC neither authorizes nor decides. It is generally acknowledged that an authorization within Chapter VII of the UNC requires explicit wording – a requirement the resolution (deliberately) does not meet. The call upon the members to “eradicate” ISIL safe havens, however, implies the use of force. Since the UNC establishes a comprehensive ban on the use of force, only self-defense or consent remain as justifications for military operations against ISIL within Iraq and Syria outside of a UNSC authorization.

So to put the resolution’s message in a nutshell: States are called upon to use force against ISIL by exercising their right to self-defense if its prerequisites are given or to urge states hosting ISIL to give their consent to armed operations on their territory if self-defense cannot be invoked. To this extent it could be argued that the resolution says nothing, but merely refers to the law as it stands. Neither does it authorize the use of force nor does it give the self-defense narrative of the “Global Coalition” unequivocal blessing. But this is only true if the context of the resolution is not also taken into account. Read the rest of this entry…

 

Claims by Dual Nationals under Investment Treaties: A New Form of Treaty Abuse?

Published on December 9, 2015        Author: 

The issue of treaty abuse (or ‘treaty shopping’) has received heightened attention recently in the context of the on-going negotiations for the conclusion of the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP). In a public consultation on the potential inclusion of an investor-State arbitration clause in TTIP, the European Commission (EC) has raised concerns regarding the investors’ manipulation of corporate nationality through the so-called “shell” or “mailbox” companies in order to take advantage of the protection afforded by investment treaties (See Public consultation on modalities for investment protection and ISDS in TTIP, Question 1, p. 18). In line with the contributions made by many of the participants involved in the consultation process, the EC has stated that these companies should be excluded from the scope of TTIP. Accordingly, the EC has proposed to narrow the definition of the term ‘investor’ by requiring that a juridical person must have ‘substantial business activities’ in the territory of a signatory State (See Public consultation on modalities for investment protection and ISDS in TTIP, Question 1, pg. 18).

The foregoing requirement certainly responds to the criticisms of inappropriate treaty shopping, and it may be considered as a useful tool to prevent corporate investors from obtaining treaty protection by illegitimate means. Yet, the EC overlooks the fact that, in addition to corporations, investment treaties might also be subject to abuse by individual investors. In this context, a new type of BIT claim is now emerging in the field of investor-State arbitration, whereby investors who hold the nationality of both contracting parties to the treaty (i.e. dual nationals) make their own State a respondent before an international tribunal. Read the rest of this entry…

 
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German Parliament decides to send troops to combat ISIS − based on collective self-defense “in conjunction with” SC Res. 2249

Published on December 8, 2015        Author: 

On 4th December 2015, after a parliamentary debate on 2d December, the German Parliament decided, with 445 positive votes (146 negative votes and seven abstentions), to honour the German’s Government’s formal request (BT Drucksache 18/6866 of 1st Dec. 2015 ) to send up to 1200 troops to combat ISIS. A formal parliamentary decision to deploy military abroad is required by the German Constitution (Basic Law) and a German 2005 law (Parlamentsbeteiligungsgesetz) which codifies prior constitutional case law.

The international legal basis for the deployment decision, as officially claimed by the Government, is “Art. 51 of the UN Charter in conjunction with Art. 42(7) TEU as well as resolutions 2170 (2014), 2199 (2015), 2249 (2015) of the Security Council.” In its request to Parliament, the Government explained that action against IS (by the US, Australia, the UK, and France) “in exercise of collectives self-defence under Art. 51 of the UN Charter is covered by resolution 2249 (2015).” (BT Drs. 18/1866, p. 3). The EU-assistance clause as invoked by France on 13th November, to which all EU member States responded on 17th November with the promise for assistance, has been analysed here by Carolyn Moser. The substance of the IS resolution 2249 has been analysed on EJIL talk! by Marc Weller, by Dapo Akande and Marko Milanovic.

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