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Challenges in Assessing Colombia’s ‘Post Conflict’: A follow-up

In March, 11 people died in a controversial army operation in Putumayo, southern Colombia. Human rights groups said that at least some of the dead appeared to be civilians. The army alleged the operation complied with international humanitarian law, saying that all the dead were “criminals” and that the operation had targeted an armed group known as Comandos de Frontera. This post, which follows-up on a previous one examining the challenges in assessing Colombia’s ‘post conflict’ scenario, discusses whether there is an armed conflict between the Colombian government and the Comandos de la Frontera. It doesn’t examine whether the army operation violated international humanitarian law (IHL); rather, it analyses whether the Colombian Ministry of Defense is right to argue that IHL was applicable to the operation first place. After presenting the “post conflict” scenario, which has been emerging since the 2017 demobilization of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) guerrillas, the post characterizes Comandos de la Frontera. This analysis is critical to determine whether the operation…

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Announcements: The Outcomes of MC12; CfP Washburn Law Journal; CfS Trade, Law and Development; Audiovisual Library of International Law; BIICL Annual WTO Conference Border Carbon Adjustment

1. SIEL Conversations: The Outcomes of MC12 and the Future of the Multilateral Trading System. Interested in the outcomes of the World Trade Organization MC12? Then join this SIEL Conversation on Monday (27 June, 2pm Brussels time), with present and former officials, negotiators and observers. They will discuss what came out of MC12, what was missing, and what the WTO should…

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The Sad and Cynical Spectacle of the Draft British Bill of Rights

It is a habit peculiar to autocracies to choose names for themselves that are the exact opposite of their true nature – viz. the ‘Democratic People’s Republic of Korea’ – and to have constitutions loudly proclaiming the protection of individual rights that are routinely trampled upon in practice. You would have hoped that one of the world’s oldest…

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Ecodefence v Russia: The ECtHR’s stance on Foreign Funding of Civil Society

On June 14th, the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR) added its voice to the critics of the Russian Foreign Agents Act with its judgment the Case of Ecodefence and Others v. Russia. Ever since the Act was passed in 2012, it was severely criticized by both Russian civil society and international institutions, including the Venice…

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Romeo Castaño v Belgium and the Duty to Cooperate under the ECHR

With a judgment of 9 July 2019, in the case of Romeo Castaño v Belgium, the second section of the European Court of Human Rights (the Court) held unanimously that Belgium had fallen short of its procedural obligations under article 2 of the Convention for failing to…

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‘With Friends Like That, Who Needs Enemies?’: Extraterritorial Sanctions Following the United States’ Withdrawal from the Iran Nuclear Agreement

On Monday 21 May 2018, the US Secretary of State announced that, as a result of its withdrawal from the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (‘JCPOA’ or ‘Iran Nuclear Deal’), the United States is set to impose the ‘strongest sanctions in history’ against Iran. While the remaining…

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A Handy Illusion? Interpretation of the ‘Unlikely to Bring Effective Relief’ Limb of Article 7(e) OPIC by the CRC in Saachi et. al.

In an EJIL Talk! blog post, Aoife Nolan laid out the salient aspects of the five inadmissibility decisions in Saachi et al. v. Argentina, Brazil, France, Germany and Turkey delivered by the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child on 8 October…

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Comment on Benvenisti & Downs', ‘National Courts, Domestic Democracy, and the Evolution of International Law’

Alison MacDonald is an English Barrister at Matrix Chambers and was a Fellow at All Souls College, Oxford from 1999 to 2006. She has acted as counsel before a range of international tribunals including the European Court of Human Rights, the Special Court for Sierra…

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The Strange Case of Florence Hartmann

Ruth Wedgwood is Edward B. Burling Professor of International Law and Diplomacy; and Director of the International Law and Organizations Program at the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies, John Hopkins University, Washington DC. She is also a  visiting fellow at the Hoover Institution.

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Catalonia’s Independence: A Reply to Joseph Weiler

Nico Krisch (Hertie School of Governance, Berlin & IBEI, Barcelona) Joseph Weiler's polemic on Catalan independence has certainly stirred up debate (see the comments on the piece), which is always helpful. But as much as I admire much of…

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