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Looking Behind the UN Youth Office: Considering Structural Limitations of Youth Participation After the Party

Last month, the UN General Assembly decided “to establish the United Nations Youth Office as a dedicated office for youth affairs in the Secretariat” (op. para. 1). While the new office was met with general praise, it is important to understand this development in a broader context of international law’s engagement with youth. Pointing to structural limitations, I argue in this blogpost that enthusiasts should be cautious. Youth participation in international law will remain what is always has been: a continuous struggle. A Brief Appraisal Resolution 76/306 is remarkable in at least three aspects. A central aim of the resolution is enhancing the structure or the architecture of youth participation. The UN General Assembly acknowledges “the proposal of the Secretary-General to establish a dedicated United Nations Youth Office in the Secretariat to ensure that the voices of youth are more systematically integrated across the United Nations system” (preamb. para. 5). As part of this, the Secretary-General’s Envoy on Youth, an office established by former Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon…

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Jurisdictional Hierarchies between Form and Fact: A Rejoinder to Roger O’Keefe

To what extent is the law of jurisdiction implicated in (hierarchical) structures of global governance? My article, ‘Jurisdiction Unbound: (Extra)territorial Regulation as Global Governance‘, pursues this question and traces how the current law of jurisdiction, quite in contrast with the often territorial, sovereignty-based imagery surrounding it, is highly permissive, especially when it comes to extraterritorial business regulation.

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Two Weeks in Review, 19 September – 2 October

New Issue of EJIL (Vol. 33 (2022) No. 2) The latest issue of the European Journal of International Law  (Vol. 33 (2022) No. 2) is now out. EJIL subscribers have full access to the latest issue of the journal at EJIL’s Oxford University Press site. Apart from articles published in the last 12…

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Announcements: UN Audiovisual Library of International Law; Knut Ipsen Lecture Series; CfA SAIELN Conference on Food Security; CfP International Law and Human Rights Postgrad Conference; Evidentiary Regimes of UN Treaty Bodies Symposium; International Refugee Law Conference

1. New Additions to the UN Audiovisual Library of International Law. The Codification Division of the UN Office of Legal Affairs recently added the following material to the UN Audiovisual Library of International Law: a Mini-Series on Diplomatic and Consular Relations by Alina Miron, Professor of International Law at the University of Angers, France (available in French). The…

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The Ogiek Case of the African Court on Human and Peoples’ Rights: Not So Much News After All?

On Friday, May 26, the African Court on Human and Peoples’ Rights (African Court) delivered its long-awaited judgement on the expulsion of the Ogiek people, a Kenyan hunter-gatherer community, from their ancestral lands in the Mau forest. As the African Commission on Human and Peoples’ Rights (African…

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ICC Prosecutor Decides that He Can’t Decide on the Statehood of Palestine. Is He Right?

On Tuesday, the Office of the Prosecutor at the International Criminal Court issued a statement denying the Prosecutor's competence to decide on Palestine's acceptance of ICC jurisdiction. The ICC Prosecutor indicated in his statement that he could not take any action as a result of the…

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Jurisdictional and Immunity Issues in the Story of Enrica Lexie : A Case of Shoot & Scoot turns around!

Harisankar K S is Assistant Professor of Law, National Law University Jodhpur, India The Enrica Lexie incident (discussed by Douglas Guilfoyle here on EJIL:Talk! a year ago) has caused ripples not only in the political and diplomatic circles…

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Call for Papers: ESIL Conference in Valencia, September 2012

The European Society of International Law has announced a call for papers for the Valencia conference in September 2012 (note that there has been a slight change of dates with regard to what was previously advertised). The PDF of the call for papers with all off the relevant deadlines and…

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Comment on Paposhvili v Belgium and the Temporal Scope of Risk Assessment

On 13 December 2016, the Grand Chamber of the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR) delivered a significant ruling in Paposhvili v Belgium, App. No. 41738/10, correcting the narrow approach to Article 3 medical removal cases taken in D v United Kingdom, App. No. 30240/96 (2…

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In the name of the European Club of Liberal Democracies: How to Evaluate the Strasbourg Jurisprudence

How should the European Court of Human Rights be reformed? Para. 41 of the Copenhagen Declaration of April 2018 seeks to scrutinise, for this purpose, recent developments in its jurisprudence, to decide, before the end of 2019, on further reform (para. 5 Copenhagen Declaration). What is a meaningful…

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