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Judgment or Judgement: What Has the ICTY Wrought?

Published on October 29, 2013        Author: 

With the ICTY turning 20 this year, perhaps the time has come to pass judgment on it. Or is it judgement? (Preemptive note to readers – this post discusses trivia, and does not claim to engage in any legal analysis, let alone any serious analysis.) As an avid consumer of the ICTY’s case law, one thing has really been bugging me over the years, and the time has come to raise it openly (and no, it’s not the dubious acquittals of a number of bad guys who should have spent the remainder of their days in prison). What’s this, you ask? It’s how the ICTY persists in spelling ‘judgment’ as ‘judgement’ in all of its official documents, including, well, their judgments – so it’s the Blaskic judgement, the Perisic judgement, the Gotovina judgement.  Oh, how I hate that, I really do.

Now you may ask yourself, come on, isn’t Marko overreacting (as usual)? Isn’t ‘judgment’ without an ‘e’ the American spelling, and ‘judgement’ with the ‘e’ the British spelling, and isn’t the ICTY just using the British variant? Wrong! Wrong, wrong, wrong. It’s true that in common usage in the US ‘judgment’ is used almost exclusively, while both ‘judgement’ and ‘judgment’ are used in the UK, with the former being more prevalent. However, in the British legal context the spelling ‘judgment’ is the conventional one and is used almost exclusively; thus the UK Supreme Court delivers judgments, not judgements. In other words, a proper, ‘public’ school and Oxbridge educated British lawyer would modestly write of himself as being indeed possessed of a fine and discerning judgement, but that today he read a jolly good judgment by Lady Hale or Lord Bingham or whoever. (For sources and discussions of the whole judgment/judgement thing, see here, here, here, and here).

I can thus only say that the ICTY’s use of ‘judgement’ to denote its own decisions is a complete and utter travesty (although I wouldn’t go so far, as I’m sure my friend Kevin Heller would, to label it as hypocrisy), since even British lawyers wouldn’t use that particular spelling in this particular context. More Catholic than the Pope, more English than the Queen, as it were. So how did this travesty get going?

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