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Home Posts tagged "modern slavery"

Modern Slavery in the Global Food Market: A Litmus Test for the Proposed Business and Human Rights Treaty

Published on August 12, 2019        Author: 
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A recent initiative to adopt the UN Treaty on Business and Human Rights (BHRT) is an attempt to correct the imbalance between rights and obligations of corporations in the field of human rights. While companies regularly invoke human rights to defend their interests, they lack corresponding obligations to respect and uphold such rights throughout their business operations. The examples of reported labour rights abuses in the Thai food industry supplying international and European markets test the capacity of the recent Draft BHRT to end impunity for human rights violations in global value chains.

Pineapple, Chicken, and Modern Slavery: Brought to You by Your Supermarket

In 2013, a Finnish NGO Finnwatch revealed serious human violations in the operations of Natural Fruit Co. Ltd., a pineapple processing company in Thailand. Natural Fruit supplied pineapple concentrate to Refresco — the Netherlands-based company with notable cus­tomers in Europe including some of the biggest supermarkets. The Finnwatch report alleged that the factory employed many undocumented workers, including children younger than the legal minimum age in Thailand, that the workers were paid less than the minimum wage prescribed by Thai laws, were forced to work overtime, had their passports and work permits confiscated, and were subject to discrimination, violence, and dangerous working conditions.

In 2016, 14 migrant workers from Myanmar filed a complaint to the National Human Rights Commission of Thailand (NHRC) against Thammakaset Co. Ltd., a Thai-registered chicken farm, which directly supplied one of the country’s top exporters of chicken. The workers complained of the various forms of ‘labor abuse’ including forced labour and the restriction of their freedom of movement by confiscating their passports and allowing them to leave the premises for only two hours per week and under supervision. (NHRC Examination Report no. 114/B.E. 2559, 31 August 2016, on file with the author). Read the rest of this entry…

Filed under: Human Rights
 

Slavery in Domestic Work: The Potential for State Responsibility?

Published on September 17, 2018        Author:  and
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On 10 September 2018, UN Special Rapporteur on Contemporary Forms of Slavery, Urmila Bhoola, presented her latest report to the Human Rights Council. The report focuses on an often-hidden aspect of modern slavery – the slavery and servitude of “marginalized women workers in the global domestic economy” (para 11). In this post, we highlight key findings of the report and also indicate areas for further exploration, including the potential use of State responsibility.

11.5 million domestic workers are international migrants, which represent 17.2% of all domestic workers and 7.7% of all migrant workers worldwide (para. 31). To give a sense of the scale, in Hong Kong there are 370,000 domestic workers of which 98.8% are women.

The social, cultural and racial biases these women face are often extreme. To give an example, Sondos Alqattan, an Instagram star and makeup artist with over 2.3 million followers, criticised new laws in Kuwait giving Filipino workers one day off per week and preventing employers from seizing their passports. She said, “How can you have a servant at home who keeps their own passport with them? What’s worse is they have one day off every week”.

The UN Special Rapporteur notes that the domestic work sector accounted for 24% of forced labour exploitation in 2017 (para 43). Exploitative practices include psychological, physical and sexual violence; retention of identity documents preventing freedom of movement; withholding of wages; and excessive overtime (para 42).

There are two aspects of the Report that make a particular contribution to the discussion of slavery in domestic work. Read the rest of this entry…