magnify
Home Posts tagged "#EJIL30"

On My Way Out – Advice to Young Scholars VI: WeakPoint, On the Uses and Abuses of PowerPoint

Published on December 10, 2019        Author: 

 

I have most certainly reached the final phase of my academic and professional career and as I look back I want to offer, for what it is worth, some dos and don’ts on different topics to younger scholars in the early phases of theirs. This is the sixth instalment and regards that staple of academic life: PowerPoint.

There is a concept in Jewish law called ‘Fencing’ (Seyag). It is a prophylactic; a new prohibition is decreed, which is not, in and of itself, biblically based but is introduced in the interest of protecting people from inadvertently committing an infraction of a divine commandment or in order to prevent people from entering into a danger zone of temptation. Here is a trivial example: the recitation of one’s nightly prayers can (and should) take place during the night. Night time lasts, surely, until daybreak – just before dawn. One o’clock in the morning is surely still night time. The Rabbis decreed a ‘Fence’ and fixed a deadline of midnight. ‘A man’, they reasoned, ‘will return home, and say to himself: I’ll eat a little bit, and drink a little bit, and sleep a little bit – and then recite my prayers. [After all, I have all night ahead of me]. He ends up sleeping all night and missing his nightly prayers.’

I have imposed on myself a Fence: No PowerPoint at all (for that matter, no FaceBook, Twitter or Instagram). It is an extreme (im)position, which I am not suggesting others should adopt. However, I am advocating a far more prudent and discerning use of PowerPoint.

The technology was originally developed for the American corporate world, driven by an ethos in which time is money – cut it short, get to the point – and in which presentation trumps deliberation, decisiveness trumps doubt, and communication is oftentimes in the command mode. Read the rest of this entry…

Filed under: Editorials, EJIL
 
Tags: ,

On My Way In – I: Impressions of a New Editor-in-Chief’s First Months in the EJIL Engine Room

Published on December 10, 2019        Author: 

 

EJIL’s Editor-in-Chief Joseph Weiler has written a series of editorials titled ‘On My Way Out’, providing advice to young scholars. I’ve always read these with great interest, considering myself squarely in the target audience. That has not changed now that I have joined him as an Editor-in-Chief of this most inspiring journal. I am very much still on my way in, although into what continues to surprise. ‘Not a single dull day at EJIL’, Joseph had promised me. He has not disappointed.

Continuing in the EJIL tradition of being as transparent as possible about the editorial process, let me share with you a few experiences as a fresh Editor-in-Chief. I hope this newcomer’s view from behind the scenes will complement the official accounts and statistics that EJIL already provides.

Unsurprisingly, the core of the job has been an enormous amount of reading. Every few weeks, the Editors-in-Chief receive a pack of over 1000 pages: new submissions, peer review reports, road maps for revisions, revised submissions, peer review reports of revised manuscripts, final submissions. Reading all of these pages is a great way to learn about emerging research areas, different styles of scholarly writing and wide-ranging approaches to peer reviewing (ranging from the rather unhelpful conclusion-only assessments to truly impressive engagement with an author’s work and detailed suggestions for improving it).

Perhaps the best and most educative part of the job has been discussing all of these articles and reports with the Associate Editors and the other Editor-in-Chief. Meeting virtually, some of us with a double espresso because in their time zone it is 6 am, we analyse each and every piece of writing. What is exciting about this article? What does the article allow us to see or understand that was not known already? Will it still be read in five years’ time? Have we recently published on the same topic? How could the argument be made clearer? Who would be in a good position to peer review in this particular area? Is the reviewer’s issue with the article one of quality or one of not liking the argument or approach? Does the author’s revision road map address the issues raised by the reviewer? Has the second, third, or even fourth version of the submission addressed all previous concerns? Read the rest of this entry…

Filed under: Editorials, EJIL
 
Tags: ,

New Issue of EJIL (Vol. 30 (2019) No. 3) Out This Week

Published on December 9, 2019        Author: 

 

The latest issue of the European Journal of International Law will be published this week. Over the coming days, we will have a series of editorial posts by Joseph Weiler and Sarah Nouwen, Editors-in-Chief of EJIL. These posts will appear in the Editorial of the new issue. 

Here is the Table of Contents for this new issue:

Editorial

On My Way In – I: Impressions of a New Editor-in-Chief’s First Months in the EJIL Engine Room; On My Way Out – Advice to Young Scholars VI: WeakPoint, On the Uses and Abuses of PowerPoint; In This Issue

Articles

Paz Andrés Sáenz de Santa María, The European Union and the Law of Treaties: A Fruitful Relationship

Vera Shikhelman, Implementing Decisions of International Human Rights Institutions – Evidence from the United Nations Human Rights Committee

Máximo Langer and Mackenzie Eason, The Quiet Expansion of Universal Jurisdiction

Symposium: International Commissions of Inquiry

Michael A. Becker and Sarah M.H. Nouwen, International Commissions of Inquiry: What Difference Do They Make? Taking an Empirical Approach

Eliav Lieblich, At Least Something: The UN Special Committee on the Problem of Hungary, 1957–1958

Hala Khoury-Bisharat, The Unintended Consequences of the Goldstone Commission of Inquiry on Human Rights Organizations in Israel

Mohamed S. Helal, Two Seas Apart: An Account of the Establishment, Operation and Impact of the Bahrain Independent Commission of Inquiry (BICI)

Roaming Charges: Moments of Dignity: Mekong River

EJIL: Debate!

Jeffrey Kahn, The Relationship between the European Court of Human Rights and the Constitutional Court of the Russian Federation: Conflicting Conceptions of Sovereignty in Strasbourg and St. Petersburg

Blankenagel, The Relationship between the European Court of Human Rights and the Constitutional Court of the Russian Federation: A Reply to Jeffrey Kahn

EJIL: Debate!

Heike Krieger, Populist Governments and International Law

Marcela Prieto Rudolphy, Populist Governments and International Law: A Reply to Heike Krieger

Paul Blokker, Populist Governments and International Law: A Reply to Heike Krieger

A Fresh Look at an Old Case

Amedeo Arena, From an Unpaid Electricity Bill to the Primacy of EU Law: Gian Galeazzo Stendardi and the Making of Costa v ENEL 

Review Essay

JHHW, FIFA – The Beautiful Game – The Ugly Organization

Sahiba Gill, Edouard Adelus and Francisco de Abreu Duarte, Whose Game? FIFA, Corruption, and the Challenge of Global Governance. Review of J. Sugden and A. Tomlinson. Football, Corruption and Lies: Revisiting ‘Badfellas’, the Book FIFA Tried to Ban; D. Conn. The Fall of the House of FIFA: The Multimillion-Dollar Corruption at the Heart of Global Soccer; H. Blake and J. Calvert. The Ugly Game: The Corruption of FIFA and the Qatari Plot to Buy the World Cup; B. Mersiades. Whatever It Takes: The Inside Story of the FIFA Way; J. Chade. Política, Propina e Futebol: Como o Padrão FIFA Ameaça o Esporte Mais Popular do Planeta

Book Reviews

William A. Schabas, The Trial of the Kaiser (Roger O’Keefe)

Honor Brabazon (ed.). Neoliberal Legality: Understanding the Role of Law in the Neoliberal Project (Anna Chadwick)

Joseph Klingler, Yuri Parkhomenko, Constantinos Salonidis (eds). Between the Lines of the Vienna Convention? Canons and Other Principles of Interpretation in Public International Law (Richard Gardiner)

The Last Page

Antjie Krog, Litany

 
Tags: ,

New Issue of EJIL (Vol. 30 (2019) No. 2) – Now Published

Published on July 22, 2019        Author: 

The latest issue of the European Journal of International Law (Vol. 30 (2019) No. 2) is now out. As usual, the table of contents of the new issue is available at EJIL’s own website, where readers can access those articles that are freely available without subscription. The free access articles in this issue are Isabel Feichtner and Surabhi Ranganathan’s International Law and Economic Exploitation in the Global Commons: Introduction and Surabhi Ranganathan’s Ocean Floor Grab: International Law and the Making of an Extractive Imaginary. EJIL subscribers have full access to the latest issue of the journal at EJIL’s Oxford University Press site. Apart from articles published in the last 12 months, EJIL articles are freely available on the EJIL website.

 
Tags: ,

Best Practice – Writing a Peer-Review Report

Published on July 22, 2019        Author: 

The importance of peer review has, if anything, increased in recent times. The enthrallment of current academia with ‘objective’ quantitative measures in the processes of selection, promotion and evaluation of academic performance has put a premium on publication in ‘peer-reviewed’ journals. Instead of a faculty reading carefully the work and making up its own mind as to its quality, they will outsource such to two anonymous peer reviewers. Also, in the face of the avalanche of self-publication in outlets such as SSRN (valuable in and of itself) and the like, peer review may help the discerning reader navigate these channels, thereby providing some guarantee of excellence.

Yet this importance is often not matched by the practice of peer review. The rate of refusal to peer review is as high as 50 per cent – oftentimes by authors who themselves have published in, and benefited from, peer-reviewed journals. Authors who publish in EJIL and I.CON undertake to peer review for our journals, an undertaking not always honoured. Of course, there is only so much peer reviewing that one can do and we understand when we receive a request to beg off with a promise to do it on some other occasion.

Then there is the problem of tardiness. Four to six weeks is a reasonable time to expect a peer-review report to come in. Frequently, to our and our authors’ frustration it can be as long as 24 weeks, after a slew of ‘gentle’ and somewhat less gentle reminders. Read the rest of this entry…

 
Tags: ,

EJIL Vol. 30 (2019) No. 2: In this Issue

Published on July 20, 2019        Author: 

This issue opens with three articles that address underexplored corners of international law. The first article focuses on the topic of customs unions. Adopting a historical perspective, Michal Ovádek and Ines Willemyns identify gaps and ambiguities in the contemporary legal definition of custom unions. They then conduct a comparative analysis to examine how different custom union agreements address these ambiguities. They observe that the design and performance of these agreements is affected by concerns over state sovereignty. Finally, they draw lessons for a possible post-Brexit EU-UK agreement regarding customs.

The second article, by Miles Jackson, discusses instigation to commit wrongful acts. He argues that contrary to the common perception, international law does include a general prohibition on instigation. In accordance with this prohibition, a state that induces or incites another state to breach its international obligations may be held responsible for an internationally wrongful act. According to Jackson, the prohibition on instigation is founded on a general principle of law accepted in many domestic jurisdictions, which should be transposed to international law.

Paolo Amorosa then explores a forgotten episode in the well-studied history of the international legal struggle for women’s equality. Whereas the common narrative dates the beginning of this struggle to the aftermath of World War II, Amorosa traces its roots to the signing of the Equal Nationality Treaty and the Equal Rights Treaty at the 1933 Montevideo Conference. In so doing, he takes a step towards the re-inclusion of early feminist activists in the dominant history of international law. Read the rest of this entry…

Filed under: EJIL
 
Tags: ,
Comments Off on EJIL Vol. 30 (2019) No. 2: In this Issue

New Issue of EJIL (Vol. 30 (2019) No. 2) Out Next Week

Published on July 19, 2019        Author: 

The latest issue of the European Journal of International Law will be published next week. Over the coming days, we will have a series of editorial posts by Joseph Weiler, Editor-in-Chief of EJIL. These posts will appear in the Editorial of the new issue. 

Here is the Table of Contents for this new issue:

Editorial

Editorial: Editor-in-Chief Sarah M. H. Nouwen; Best Practice – Writing a Peer-Review Report; In this Issue

Articles

Michal Ovádek and Ines Willemyns, International Law of Customs Unions: Conceptual Variety, Legal Ambiguity and Diverse Practice

Miles Jackson, State Instigation in International Law: A General Principle Transposed

Paolo Amorosa, Pioneering International Women’s Rights? The US National Woman’s Party and the 1933 Montevideo Equal Rights Treaties Read the rest of this entry…

 
Tags: ,
Comments Off on New Issue of EJIL (Vol. 30 (2019) No. 2) Out Next Week

EJIL: Editor-in-Chief Sarah M. H. Nouwen

Published on July 19, 2019        Author: 

We are very pleased to announce that, as of this issue, the EJIL family (EJIL, EJIL: Talk! and EJIL: Live!) will be led by two Editors-in-Chief. By unanimous decision of EJIL‘s Board of Management, Sarah Nouwen will join J.H.H. Weiler at the helm of EJIL. Dr Nouwen serves as Senior Lecturer at the University of Cambridge and was recently appointed as Professor of International Law at the European University Institute. She has been a member of EJIL‘s Editorial Board for several years.

 
Tags: ,

New Issue of EJIL (Vol. 30 (2019) No. 1) – Now Published

Published on May 29, 2019        Author: 

The latest issue of the European Journal of International Law (Vol. 30 (2019) No. 1) is now out. As usual, the table of contents of the new issue is available at EJIL’s own website, where readers can access those articles that are freely available without subscription. The free access articles in this issue are Martti Koskenniemi’s Imagining the Rule of Law: Re-reading the Grotian ‘Tradition’ and Hannah Woolaver’s From Joining to Leaving: Domestic Law’s Role in the International Legal Validity of Treaty Withdrawal. EJIL subscribers have full access to the latest issue of the journal at EJIL’s Oxford University Press site. Apart from articles published in the last 12 months, EJIL articles are freely available on the EJIL website.

 

 

 

 
Tags: ,
Comments Off on New Issue of EJIL (Vol. 30 (2019) No. 1) – Now Published

The EU – A Community of Fate, at Last; Vital Statistics

Published on May 28, 2019        Author: 

The EU – A Community of Fate, at Last

I have great sympathy for the outburst of Donald Tusk on special places in Hell. I believe I was just as harsh or even worse in writing about the Cameron folly. At the time of writing, the final act in the Brexit farce is still unfolding. I am one of those Europeans who genuinely regret the departure of the United Kingdom – and I am not thinking just of the material consequences, as most are prone to do. A Europe without the UK is diminished. But I also respect the sovereign decision of the British people and, equally, I will of course respect a sovereign decision to change course, should that happen. Responsibility for the current shambles rests primarily on the very issue which so taxed Tusk: going into the referendum without any serious governmental assessment of the hows and whats and whens.

Some responsibility also falls on the Union. I thought that the decision to postpone any discussion of future relations before the divorce terms were settled wasted a precious year of joint reflection, negotiations and preparations. I thought then and still think that there was no reason not to run both tracks in parallel so as to avoid the very crunch that we now face. In private, some European leaders have admitted such to me.

And finally, I continue to find it not credible that the combined public authorities of the Union, the UK and the Republic of Ireland cannot come up with a Frontstop solution on the lines proposed here, thus diffusing the most explosive stumbling block for some semblance of an orderly exit. Read the rest of this entry…

Filed under: Editorials, EJIL
 
Tags: ,
Comments Off on The EU – A Community of Fate, at Last; Vital Statistics