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In this Issue

Published on March 30, 2015        Author: 

This issue opens with the first entry under our new, annual rubric, The EJIL Foreword. Taking the ongoing debate concerning the United Nations’ role in the Haitian cholera tragedy as his starting point, Jan Klabbers presents a masterly tour d’horizon of the intellectual origins, current state, and future prospects of the law of international organizations. In the process, he reconstructs – and exposes the blind spots and biases – of a functionalist theory that he identifies as specific to and underlying that law.

In the next article in the issue, Janina Dill presents a novel framework for understanding the different set of demands made on states in war. Identifying ‘three logics of waging war’ – associated respectively with international humanitarian law, military strategy, and an individual rights-based morality – she concludes that the three cannot be reconciled, presenting war-making states with an irresolvable ‘trilemma’. On a related topic, but adopting a very different approach, Amanda Alexander presents a new and revisionist history of international humanitarian law, locating its origins in the work of a particular set of actors from the 1970s onwards. Bart Smit Duijzentkunst and Sophia Dawkins, draw from relational contract theory to construct an innovative model of arbitration in peace processes, and demonstrate the value of that theory and model through a set of carefully presented case studies. And Ulf Linderfalk’s short article on the perennially relevant topic of treaty interpretation adduces a series of well-chosen examples to elucidate the relationship between the aims and means of interpretation.

In Roaming Charges, the ‘Moment of Dignity’ is  a photograph that celebrates the small traditions we risk losing in our fast-moving world. The photographer is Martin Lestra, PhD researcher at the European University Institute. We remind our readers that submissions to Roaming Charges are welcome.

The articles section of this issue is rounded out by the return of two of our regular rubrics, EJIL: Debate! and Critical Review of International Jurisprudence, both addressing topics relating to the European Court of Human Rights. Under the first, we present Stéphanie Hennette Vauchez’s somewhat provocative article on the issue of gender balance within the Court, assessing the politics of the appointment process through a detailed analysis of the self-presentation by the 120 or so women who have applied for positions on the Court. We publish Replies by Françoise Tulkens and Fionnuala Ní Aoláin, both of whom have direct, personal experience of that process. Finally, Paolo Lobba surveys the development of the Court’s jurisprudence on Holocaust denial, which he argues has important implications for ‘denialism’ in relation to other core international crimes.
The Last Page, offering nourishment for the soul as well as the mind, presents a poem by Dimitri Van den Meerssche entitled ‘Calling Themis’.

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Vital Statistics

Published on March 30, 2015        Author: 

Here are our ‘vital stats’ for 2014. Each year we track trends in the submission and publication of unsolicited manuscripts according to criteria of gender, place of submission and language. Note that there are no special requirements for authors wishing to submit to EJIL (you don’t have to hold a PhD or have a tenured position or write with impeccable Oxford English) nor is there any editorial affirmative action in selecting manuscripts for publication. Our double-blind review process guards against that. So the statistics we present speak plainly about the submissions we receive and the manuscripts accepted for publication.

Having seen a rise in the percentage of manuscripts submitted and published by women authors in the previous two years, the figures stabilized in 2014 at 35 per cent both for submissions and accepted articles. The figure was 28 per cent for published articles (recall that published articles largely reflect submissions of the previous year). For now I regard this as a blip – I doubt it signals a trend.

We divide the world into four regions for our statistical purposes: the European Union, the Council of Europe countries outside the EU, the US and Canada, and the rest of the world. This statistic might seem a little misleading as it indicates the place of submission – normally the institution at which authors work or study, rather than their actual nationality – but overall we believe it conveys a fairly reliable picture of our authors. Of the total number of manuscripts submitted in 2014, 43 per cent came from the EU, 8 per cent from CoE countries, 25 per cent from the US and Canada and 24 per cent from the rest of the world; very similar figures to those of the previous year. For accepted and published articles, the EU took a slightly larger share of the cake, with 58 and 59 per cent of the total, respectively, whilst CoE countries claimed 5 per cent of accepted articles and a larger 15 per cent of those published. For the US and Canada, the figures were 16 per cent for accepted articles and 20 per cent for those published, whereas the rest of the world took 21 per cent of accepted articles and only 6 per cent of published articles. The 2015 ‘published’ figures will reflect the higher rate of acceptances from the rest of the world in 2014.  Read the rest of this entry…

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Announcements: Essex Human Rights Summer School; CfP on Law and Boundaries (Paris); Professor Vacancy (Sussex); CfP on Economic Crisis and Human Rights (London); Conference on Quantum in Investor-State Arbitration (London); Summer Program on Human Rights and Humanitarian Law (Washington); CfP on the Chagos Litigation (Greenwich); CfP on Use of Force

Published on March 28, 2015        Author: 

1.  Essex Human Rights Summer School, 29 June to 7 July 2015. The Human Rights Centre at the University of Essex is delighted to announce the full details of our Essex Human Rights Summer School, which will take place at our Colchester campus from 29 June to 7 July 2015. Following on from our highly successful launch last year, the Human Rights Centre will offer its five day summer school in Human Rights Research Methods from 29 June to 3 July. This will be followed by a second week (6 – 7 July) of thematic modules on cutting edge issues in human rights.We have put together an exciting teaching team of some of the leading Essex and external human rights academics and practitioners, all with extensive experience of researching and working on human rights issues in a wide range of contexts. The summer school is ideal for human rights professionals working in NGOs, government and international organisations; lawyers; academics and postgraduate students. Full details on the modules, sessions and how to book a place, including details of an early booking discount running until 20 April, are available on our website.

2.  The fourth annual international “Law and Boundaries” conference will be held at Sciences-Po in Paris on 17-18 June. It is relevant for PhD candidates and for young scholars (i.e. recently and no so recently graduated PhD), not necessarily from the legal field and preferably with a critical perspective (but not only “crits”). The call for papers is here.

3. The University of Sussex is hiring a Professor of International Law. See the announcement here.

4.  The Centre for International and Public Law (CIPL), Brunel University London announces its annual guest lecture followed by an in-depth discussion, “The Economic Crisis and The Failure of Human Rights”, to be held ON Tuesday 21 April 2015, from 2:00 pm to 5:00 pm in the Moot Court, Elliott Jacques Building, Brunel Law School, Brunel University London, Uxbridge, UB8 3PH. Guest Speaker: Professor Aoife Nolan (University of Nottingham); Chair: Professor Manisuli Sssenyonjo (Brunel University London). A reception will follow at 5.00 pm by serving free refreshment. More information is here. Read the rest of this entry…

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ICON·S Conference; EJIL on your iPad!!!

Published on March 28, 2015        Author: 

ICON·S Conference  

The second conference of the International Society of Public Law (ICON·S), around the theme of ‘Public Law in an Uncertain World’, will be held in New York, at the New York University School of Law, on 1 – 3 July, 2015. The Call for Papers and Panels is open until 10 April 2015 and more information is available on the ICON·S website.

EJIL on your iPad!!!

We have ‘gambled’ and invested considerable resources, human and material, in developing a tablet version of EJIL. We believe a tablet version represents a perfect adaptation of one of our most important identity markers to the digital age and current reading habits.

The identity marker has two facets. The first is our huge commitment to a Journal which is not only edited but ‘curated’. For each issue we pay attention not only to the individual articles but to the ensemble. We try to make, in each and every issue, the whole greater than the sum of the parts, with careful, even loving, attention given to the construction of an interesting, rich and satisfying whole. Not just something of interest to different tastes and constituencies, but a more holistic concept of what a good journal issue should be and feel like. I have habitually extolled (and cajoled) our readers to actually pick up the hard copy of EJIL to enjoy the ‘book feel’ of each issue.

The second facet is our long-standing commitment to the aesthetics of publication. It is based on the premise that beauty is an integral part of the world of the mind. A well-written article, for example, has a beauty that stands independently of the content as well as enhancing such. We all spend a huge amount of time and effort on our research and writing, and EJIL believes that the result deserves a presentation that does justice to such effort. A beautiful painting deserves a beautiful frame. If you look at the paper version of EJIL you cannot fail to notice this commitment reflected in seemingly trivial details such as the quality of paper and print. OUP has been our wonderful partner in crime in trying to achieve this.

We are, however, aware that for many the paper version is at best a (beautiful) doorstop. Hence the tablet version of EJIL – capturing both the holistic and ‘wholistic’ sense of each issue as well as its aesthetic qualities.

A tablet version is quite different to ‘going online’. The entire issue downloads onto your tablet. You can then browse and read at leisure away from your desk. If you are like me, it is likely to be on some long flight. You can leaf through the issue or click a title in the ToC and skip to it.

To be clear, the tablet version will not replace the online access that subscribers are entitled to on the OUP platform or the free access to the EJIL archives (except for the current year) on the www.ejil.org site. Rather, it will offer a new and different reading dimension.

We gambled that the tablet version will be a huge success with many of our existing subscribers and will encourage many other readers to become individual subscribers.  Make no mistake: this initiative is not driven in any way by economic considerations. The individual subscription to EJIL is among the lowest in the field, if not the lowest, and has been kept constant for years. It is practically an at-cost price. You will also note that the difference between the individual subscription rate and the cost of membership in the European Society of International Law (ESIL) is negligible. All members of the Society are offered a subscription to EJIL. So my recommendation would be to use this occasion to become a member of ESIL and enjoy all membership benefits as well as a subscription to EJIL, including access to the new tablet version!

The app will launch with this issue of the Journal. In a first phase it will be available only for Apple devices. An Android version will follow shortly.  Access to content through the app will be limited to individual subscribers and ESIL members. Subscribers should visit www.exacteditions.com/print/ejil and enter their OUP customer ID number for authentication, then simply follow the links from that page to install the app to their device. New subscribers will receive full instructions from OUP.

For those attending the ASIL meeting in April, visit the OUP stand. There will be free access to the EJIL app in the vicinity.

 Finally, although we tested a beta version for several months there are bound to be some teething problems (please be patient) and ways to improve the tablet version. Do not hesitate to write to us.

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Response

Published on March 27, 2015        Author: 

First off, I’d like to express my sincere gratitude for the care and thoughtfulness with which Professors Tom Dannenbaum, Jan Klabbers, and Paul Stephan have engaged my article. Before turning to their individual commentaries, I want to briefly address one common theme in their remarks: that the link between IO legitimacy and IO reputation for compliance with international law can be quite complicated.

That’s absolutely right; after all, compliance with international law is only one facet of IOs’ legitimacy. Other facets include the morality of IOs’ actions (or omissions), IOs’ effectiveness in achieving the purposes for which they were created, and—especially in the context of technocratic organizations—their scientific and technical expertise.

In this article, I focused on compliance with international law because I was seeking to explain why the IO Responsibility Articles will have important practical consequences. That required explaining why IOs and their member states would pay attention to claims made in transnational discourse about IOs’ international obligations and possible violations. I argued that IOs would heed such discourse because it could threaten their reputations for complying with international law, and IOs have even more reasons than states do to cultivate those reputations. IOs that flout international law risk being perceived as illegitimate, and IOs that are perceived to be illegitimate will be less effective—and will face more obstacles to securing both financial support and cooperation from their member states.

I completely agree, however, that a fuller account of when and why IOs and their member states will be motivated to comply with international law would have to wrestle with the other facets of IO legitimacy—and especially the way they might be in tension with one another. Read the rest of this entry…

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The EJIL Annual Foreword

Published on March 27, 2015        Author: 

Starting with the present issue, we will be publishing The EJIL Foreword in the first issue of each year.

The idea, and the title, are unashamedly ‘borrowed’ (we did not ask them) from the famous Harvard Law Review Foreword. We will be inviting each year a ‘distinguished’ scholar in the field – distinguished not simply by an illustrious career, but also by having, we believe, something interesting to say – to present a ‘state of the field’ type article, permitting on an annual basis a regular ‘deep breath’ reflection on international law with a horizontal appeal to many readers.

A higher word limit, in the range of 40,000 words, will permit, we trust and hope, a more extensive analysis, synthesis, conceptualization, or systemic theorization than is usually possible in an EJIL article. Considerable licence will be given to each author to define the topic of his or her Foreword, but in principle it will be expected to:

  • define an original vision of the field, and/or
  • reflect on the state of the discipline as a whole (or a particularly pressing challenge facing it)

in light of recent events and developments in practice.

The inaugural Foreword, by Jan Klabbers, published in this issue captures, in its ambition, breadth and depth, precisely the type of piece we have in mind. We also invite readers to watch the extensive EJIL Live! conversation with Professor Klabbers concerning his Foreword.

The celebrated Hague General Courses serve in some ways a similar function to The EJIL Foreword, but both the format and size of a General Course of International Law are quite different.  Our own ambition and hope is that the Foreword will establish itself in its own way as a kind of ‘cousin’ of the General Course, an important ‘event’ on the IL intellectual calendar, and that over time the accumulation of EJIL Forewords will constitute a repository of profound reflection on international law itself and of self-reflection on the academic discipline of international law.

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UN Human Rights Council Adopts Resolution on a Special Rapporteur for Privacy

Published on March 26, 2015        Author: 

The Council today adopted by consensus the resolution on privacy in the digital age, which includes the creation of a new special procedure. Bearing in mind the wide scope of the right to privacy, this SR is sure to be a mega-mandate. The resolution is available here; Privacy International press release here.

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New Issue of EJIL (Vol. 26: No. 1) Out Next Week

Published on March 26, 2015        Author: 

The latest issue of the European Journal of International Law will be published next week. Beginning tomorrow, we will have a series of posts by Joseph Weiler, Editor in Chief of EJIL. These posts will appear in the Editorial in the upcoming issue. Here is the Table of Contents:

Editorial

Brexit: No Happy Endings; The EJIL Annual Foreword; EJIL on your iPad!!!; Vital Statistics; ICON.S Conference; In this Issue

The EJIL Foreword 

Jan Klabbers, The EJIL Foreword: The Transformation of International Organizations Law

 Articles

Janina Dill, The 21st-Century Belligerent’s Trilemma

Amanda Alexander, A Short History of International Humanitarian Law

Bart L. Smit Duijzentkunst and Sophia L. R. Dawkins, Arbitrary Peace? Consent Management in International Arbitration

Ulf Linderfalk, Is Treaty Interpretation an Art or a Science? International Law and Rational Decision-Making

 Roaming Charges: Moments of Dignity

Martin Lestra, Conserving Traditions – Jam-making in Ruoms, France

 EJIL: Debate!

Stéphanie Hennette Vauchez, More Women – But Which Women? The Rule and the Politics of Gender Balance at the European Court of Human Rights

Françoise Tulkens, More Women – But Which Women? A Reply to Stéphanie Hennette Vauchez

Fionnuala Ní Aoláin, More Women – But Which Women? A Reply to Stéphanie Hennette Vauchez

 Critical Review of International Jurisprudence

Paolo Lobba, Holocaust Denial before the European Court of Human Rights: Evolution of an Exceptional Regime

 Review Essays

Helmut Philipp Aust, Shining Cities on the Hill? The Global City, Climate Change, and International Law. Review of Michele Acuto. Global Cities, Governance and Diplomacy. The Urban Link; Benjamin Barber. If Mayors Ruled the World. Rising Cities, Declining Nation States; Sofie Bouteligier. Cities, Networks, and Global Environmental Governance. Spaces of Innovation, Places of Leadership; Simon Curtis (ed.). The Power of Cities in International Relations

Jochen von Bernstorff, International Law and Global Justice: On Recent Inquiries into the Dark Side of Economic Globalization, Review of Emmanuelle Tourme-Jouannet. What is a Fair International Society?; Chios Carmodi, Frank J. Garcia and John Linarelli (eds). Global Justice and International Economic Law; Iris Marion Young. Responsibility for Justice; Thomas Pogge. Politics as Usual. What Lies Behind the Pro-Poor Rhetoric.

 Book Reviews

Anne Peters. Jenseits der Menschenrechte. Die Rechtsstellung des Individuums im Völkerrecht [Beyond Human Rights. The Legal Status of the Individual in Public International Law] (Andreas Th. Müller)

Giovanna Adinolfi. Poteri e interventi del Fondo monetario internazionale [Powers and Actions of the International Monetary Fund] (Annamaria Viterbo)

Krista Nadakavukaren Schefer (ed.). Poverty and the International Economic Legal System: Duties to the World’s Poor (Elaine Kellman)

 The Last Page

Dimitri Van den Meerssche, Calling Themis

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Reputation and Responsibility: Moving the Goalposts

Published on March 26, 2015        Author: 

Kristina Daugirdas renders an excellent exposition of a particular kind of argument about the development (us economics-oriented folk might say production) of international law. She focuses on the ILC’s Draft Articles on the Responsibility of International Organizations, a measure that some have criticized as premature. The degree of discomfort with the project that IOs have shown, however, might suggest (somewhat paradoxically) that its time has come, if only as a focus of debate. She illustrates the salience of the Draft Articles through the lens of the cholera crisis in Haiti, a matter that the United Nations has handled with all the finesse of a Fortune 500 CEO confronted horrific product liabilities.

Within the terms of her argument, Daugirdas succeeds in establishing her conclusion. The Draft Articles provide a defined and ostensibly neutral set of claims about responsibility and compensation. The absence of clarity in the international legal system about the content of the international law that IOs might violate, thus incurring responsibility, is not an impediment to talking about this. Debates about responsibility can contribute to the definition of primary obligations. Acts of reparation can reinforce the legal, rather than political and moral, nature of the obligation. An important means of inducing potentially responsible actors ‒ IOs ‒ to confront these claims is the impact of their actions on their reputation.

I do not want to push back against any part of Daugirdas’s argument. Rather, I want to use this opportunity to reflect a bit on the value ‒ and limits ‒ of two concepts on which her argument rests. Both transnational discourse and reputation present interesting problems that Daugirdas acknowledges, but understandably does not fully explore. My ultimate goal is to move the goalposts for talking about the processes involved in producing international law.

Transnational discourse. Let me posit that law making and law applying is largely a discursive process involving the manipulation of symbols to achieve verbal communication. In other words, talk matters a lot. This brute fact may frustrate the economically oriented, who usually prefer to look at preferences revealed by actions and may regard discussion as potential disinformation. No competent lawyer, however, can fail to attend carefully to the arguments made in the process of moving towards a legal outcome. Read the rest of this entry…

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Kristina Daugirdas, ‘Reputation and the Responsibility of International Organizations’

Published on March 25, 2015        Author: 

It has long been recognized by international lawyers of a more or less critical bent that one of the ways international law can be considered useful – regardless of the question whose idea of usefulness it serves – is that is provides a vocabulary for discussing things. Rules on use of force and self-defense may not solve conflicts, but provide a language (and often enough the most relevant language) for discussing the use of force. Rules on international trade may not solve trade conflicts, but help provide the relevant actors with a language in which to discuss whether tuna caught by means of driftnet fishing should be banned from markets or not. And even the rules on state succession, limited and few as they are, help facilitate discussions on what to do once a succession of states occurs.

In this light, Kristina Daugirdas’ main argument is hardly surprising. The point that the ILC’s articles on the responsibility of international organizations will play a role in what she refers to as ‘transnational discourse’ is both well-taken and well-crafted. Indeed, the evidence in support of that proposition is perhaps even stronger than she realizes: both before and after their adoption by the ILC, the articles have been referred to by international and domestic courts, including the European Court of Human Rights. That said, it is perhaps also useful to note that the International Court of Justice managed to avoid making any reference to the ILC articles in two recent decisions where a fleeting reference could have been expected: the 2011 judgment between Fyrom and Greece, and the 2012 advisory opinion on the International Fund for Agricultural Development. Still, on the topic at hand, the ILC’s articles are the main authoritative instrument available, so it stands to reason that participants in transnational discourse make reference to it, and look at the articles for inspiration and guidance, regardless of whether the articles are formally binding or can be said to reflect customary international law.

If her general point is not all that surprising, the more interesting part of Daugirdas’ article resides in the combination she makes of two distinct approaches to the study of international organizations. She draws inspiration both from constructivism (highlighting the relevance of norms) and rational choice theory (assuming actors to be inspired by rationalist motives in the pursuit of their self-interest), and does so to good effect. In itself, this combination too is not entirely novel: Ian Hurd and Ian Johnstone have done something similar in recent years (to name just two examples), and one of the Ur-texts of constructivism, Fritz Kratochwil’s Rules, Norms and Decisions (1989) was to a remarkable (and oft-forgotten) degree also inspired by rationalist insights. That said, in his later work Kratochwil seems to have lost some confidence in that kind of reasoning – or maybe he just lost confidence in some of its practitioners. Read the rest of this entry…

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