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Our Most Read Posts in 2014

Published on December 31, 2014        Author: 

This has been another successful year for EJIL:Talk as readership of the blog continues to grow. We are grateful to you, our readers, for coming back to us again and again. A new addition to the European Journal of International Law this year has been the introduction of EJIL:Live! which is a series of video and audio podcasts released at the same time as the publication of each quarterly issue of the Journal. The video and audio episodes feature an in-depth discussion between the authors of one article that appears in the issue and EJIL’s Editor in Chief, Joseph Weiler. I have to say, on a personal note, that I have thoroughly enjoyed those discussions. To my mind, the spoken word, and the back and forth of dialogue, adds much value to the written text in the journal. They greatly enrich critical understanding of the author’s argument and also of the area in which it is situated. The authors not only explain the argument in their article, but also discuss the inspiration and motivations for writing the piece. In the discussion, the arguments are not only explored and challenged, but the authors are also pushed to explain the significance of the argument – why does it matter? how does it matter? There is much to be gained from listening or watching. In addition to discussion with authors, the audio podcasts also include a variety of news and reviews (including discussions from or about the blog).

EJIL: Live Extras! are shorter, in-a-nutshell, episodes which address a variety of topical and interesting issues. Earlier this month 3 episodes of EJIL:Live Extra! became available for viewing. They are interviews with Aharon Barak, former President of the Israeli Supreme Court on the Israeli Supreme Court’s approach to standing and justiciability; Brian Leiter, University of Chicago on whether freedom of religion deserves special protection; and André Nollkaemper, President of the European Society of International Law (ESIL) on the first 10 years of ESIL.

Below are our 20 most read posts of 2014. As is apparent from simply glancing at the list, Russia’s intervention in and subsequent annexation of Crimea was the issue that generated most interest among our readers this year.  We wish you a very Happy New Year and a happy 2015!

1. Daniel Wisehart, The Crisis in Ukraine and the Prohibition of the Use of Force: A Legal Basis for Russia’s Intervention?

2. Nico Krisch, Crimea and the Limits of International Law

3. Christian Marxsen, Crimea’s Declaration of Independence

4. Dapo Akande, The Legality of Military Action in Syria: Humanitarian Intervention and Responsibility to Protect

5. Jure Vidmar, Crimea’s Referendum and Secession: Why it Resembles Northern Cyprus More than Kosovo

6. Douglas Guilfoyle, So, you want to do a PhD in international law?

7. Marko Milanovic, Crimea, Kosovo, Hobgoblins and Hypocrisy

8. Philip Leach, Ukraine, Russia and Crimea in the European Court of Human Rights

9. Lauri Mälksoo Crimea and (the Lack of) Continuity in Russian Approaches to International Law

10. Dapo Akande, Appeal from the Ukrainian Association of International Law

11. Anne Peters, Sense and Nonsense of Territorial Referendums in Ukraine, and Why the 16 March Referendum in Crimea Does Not Justify Crimea’s Alteration of Territorial Status under International Law

12. Antonios Tzanakopoulos, Kadi Showdown: Substantive Review of (UN) Sanctions by the ECJ

13. Kai Ambos, Palestine, UN Non-Member Observer Status and ICC Jurisdiction

14. Anne Peters, Crimea: Does “The West“ Now Pay the Price for Kosovo?

15.  Stephanie Berry, SAS v France: Does Anything Remain of the Right to Manifest Religion?

16. Dapo Akande, European Court of Human Rights Upholds State Immunity in Case Involving Allegations of Torture – Jones v United Kingdom

17. Philippa Webb, Jones v UK: The re-integration of State and official immunity?

18. Marko Milanovic, UN Security Council Adopts Resolution 2178 on Foreign Terrorist Fighters

19. Thomas Grant, Crimea after Cyprus v. Turkey: Just Satisfaction for Unlawful Annexation?

20. Diane Desierto, The Right to Regulate for Public Morals Upheld (Somewhat): The WTO Panel Report in EC-Seal Products

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