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GoJIL: Call for Papers

Published on October 12, 2012        Author: 

The editors of the Goettingen Journal of International Law send the following announcement:

Vol. 5, Issue No. 1 of the Goettingen Journal of International Law will include a focus on the law and politics of indigenous peoples in international law.

Indigenous peoples received increasing public and scholarly attention over the last decades. It has been a unique journey from the colonial history to the beginning of their political presence in the United Nations since the 1970s to the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples in 2007. The UN’s International Year for the World’s Indigenous Peoples in 1993 as well as the following decades of the world’s indigenous peoples from 1995 to 2004 and 2006 to 2015 prove the ongoing need to attend to indigenous peoples’ interests. Today, discourses of indigenous peoples rights and their claim for self-determination are found beyond International Human Rights law: topics such as intellectual property rights, control over the exploitation of natural resources, the protection of traditional knowledge and traditional cultural expressions are on the agenda. Underlying all is the constant debate about a definition and the implementation of indigenous peoples’ rights beyond the Americas, particularly in Asia and Africa. In order to shine a light on the legal and political problems indigenous peoples are facing, we call for authors to submit papers on the topic.

The submission deadline is 1 March 2013. For more information contact us at info {at} gojil(.)eu.

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One Response

  1. Dr Olugbenga Ademodi

    Topic about a definition and the implementation of indigenous peoples’ rights beyond the Americas, particularly in Asia and Africa is one that is long overdue. Although various indigenous peoples definitions has been propounded by United Nations, World Bank and a host of experts on the subject, such definition seems to have groups in western world in mind amd does not favour peoples desirous of the status in Africa and thus denying potential groups in Africa of such status and rights.