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New Issue of EJIL (Vol. 27 (2016) No. 2) Published

Published on July 27, 2016        Author: 

The latest issue of the European Journal of International Law (Vol. 27, No. 2) is out today. As usual, the table of contents of the new issue is available at EJIL’s own website, where readers can access those articles that are freely available without subscription. The free access article in this issue is Karen Alter, James Gathii and Laurence Helfer’s Backlash against International Courts in West, East and Southern Africa: Causes and Consequences. We will be hosting a discussion of their article next week. EJIL subscribers have full access to the latest issue of the journal at EJIL’s Oxford University Press site. Apart from articles published in the last 12 months, EJIL articles are freely available on the EJIL website.

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EJIL: In this Issue (Vol. 27 (2016) No. 2)

Published on July 26, 2016        Author: 

This issue opens with a pair of articles that address questions of normative coherence and contestation in two central areas of international law. In the first article, Monica Hakimi and Jacob Katz Cogan address the presence of a puzzling incoherence in the legal regime relating to the use of force. Their article theorizes that this incoherence derives from the combination within the regime of two distinct ‘codes’, thus offering a useful framework for thinking through interpretive debates in the field. In our second article, Karen Alter, James Gathii and Laurence Helfer offer an insightful and timely discussion of the causes and consequences of state backlash against sub-regional courts across the African continent. Their article usefully highlights the work of courts that may remain unfamiliar to many of our readers, while casting new light on a range of theoretical debates relating to international courts. Our EJIL: Live! interview with Karen Alter deepens the discussion.

The next three articles likewise address important questions of normative authority in international law. Nicole Roughan argues that international law’s claims to authority should be understood as claims to relative authority, dependent upon the relationships and interactions with other institutions. Elisa Morgera offers some conceptual clarity in the little-investigated notion of fair and equitable benefit-sharing, identifying shared normative elements from different regimes to help develop a common core to this concept. Finally, David McGrogan provides an incisive analytical framework for understanding both the growth of the culture of human rights indicators and its unintended consequences, showcasing the competing priorities of certainty and uniformity on the one hand, and experiential and conversational approaches on the other.

Our occasional series on The European Tradition in International Law returns in this issue, featuring a remarkably rich and varied collection dedicated to the controversial 19th-century Scottish jurist, James Lorimer. The collection opens with a short overview by Stephen Tierney and Neil Walker, highlighting the tension between Lorimer’s remarkable foresight in relation to a number of developments in international law, cast against his deeply embedded racial prejudice. This darker side of Lorimer’s legal science is examined further by Martti Koskenniemi, whose article considers the importance of racial hierarchies that underpinned Lorimer’s conception of statehood. Gerry Simpson traces the legacies of these attitudes in international law, including the extension of Lorimer’s hierarchies in legally codified power. Karen Knop likewise explores the continuing resonances of Lorimer’s thought in the present day, focusing in particular on his notion of ‘private citizens of the world’. Stephen Neff discusses Lorimer’s views on war and neutrality, highlighting the remarkable modernity of his approach in seeking a systematic global regulatory framework.

Roaming Charges in this issue features a photograph of pupils at the Jean Paul II High School, Kibera, Nairobi.

In the last article in this issue, appearing in our regular series Critical Review of International Jurisprudence, Katie Sykes explores the use of science in the emerging field of ‘global animal law’, through an analysis of two recent and important international legal decisions, the first by the Appellate Body of the World Trade Organization in the EC–Seal Products dispute, and the second by the International Court of Justice in Whaling in the Antarctic.

The Last Page in this issue, entitled ‘Reasons’, is by Liam McHugh-Russell.

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EJIL on Your Tablet or Smartphone

Published on July 26, 2016        Author: 

ESIL members will know that, following the decision taken at the 2015 General Assembly meeting, membership of the Society now includes an online subscription to EJIL and access to the EJIL app. The app, available for both Apple and Android systems, allows you to download and read the Journal on your mobile device – anywhere and at any time.

ESIL members can access the EJIL app in just a few, simple steps:

  1. Shortly after joining ESIL, you will receive an OUP customer ID number
  2. Go to exacteditions.com/print/ejil and enter that number plus your email address and choice of password
  3. The site will authenticate you as a user
  4. Go to the appropriate App Store (Apple or Android) and download the EJIL app
  5. When you reach the login page enter your registered email address and password

For ESIL members who wish to receive the print edition, a special reduced price subscription is available.

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One Swallow Does Not a Summer Make, but Might the Paris Agreement on Climate Change a Better Future Create?

Published on July 25, 2016        Author: 

Note from Joseph Weiler, Editor-in-Chief of the European Journal of International Law:

I have invited Laurence Boisson de Chazournes, member of the EJIL Editorial Board, to write the Editorial for the latest issue of EJIL (Vol. 27 (2016) No. 2).

The Conference of the Parties in Paris in December 2015, with the subsequent adoption of the Paris Agreement on Climate Change, was a significant event, from both a political and a legal perspective. It is politically significant not least because it is the first universal agreement on climate change, involving 195 countries and the EU, to be adopted. However, the event was also legally significant for a host of reasons upon which this Editorial will touch. Overall, it represents an evolution in legal technique, especially with regard to the measures and procedures used to achieve the intended objective. Legal events like this are noteworthy in the way that they introduce innovations and provoke reflection.

The Paris Agreement is indeed an interesting legal creature. In trying to shape a better future than is foreseeable, if present consumption patterns of fossil fuels continue, the Agreement adopts a legal technique that breaks new ground. It envisages the elimination of the use of fossil fuel energy by the end of the 21st century. This would be quite an achievement, given that fossil fuel energy has shaped the economy of the 20th century in so many different ways. The Agreement is intended to come into force in 2020, and the objective it sets is to be achieved in the second part of this century, which is indeed several decades from now. It goes without saying that a great number of us will no longer be here when the goals of the Agreement are to be realized, and we are thus being asked to act for the generations to come. Interestingly, in addition to building a long-term future, the Agreement makes provision for meetings, as well as for tasks to be achieved at these meetings, in the near future. Some of these meetings will take place in 2018, 2023, 2025 and thereafter. The path to the longer-term objective is thus paved with the fulfilment of shorter-term commitments. Read the rest of this entry…

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Filed under: Climate Change, Editorials, EJIL
 

New Issue of EJIL (Vol. 27 (2016) No. 2) – Out Next Week

Published on July 22, 2016        Author: 

The latest issue of the European Journal of International Law will be published next week. Over the coming days, we will have a series of posts by Joseph Weiler – Editor in Chief of EJIL. These posts will appear in the Editorial of the upcoming issue. Here is the Table of Contents for this new issue:

Editorial

One Swallow Does Not a Summer Make, but Might the Paris Agreement on Climate Change a Better Future Create?; EJIL on Your Tablet or Smartphone; In this Issue

Articles

Monica Hakimi and Jacob Katz Cogan, The Two Codes on the Use of Force

Karen J. Alter, James T. Gathii and Laurence R. Helfer, Backlash against International Courts in West, East and Southern Africa: Causes and Consequences

Nicole Roughan, Mind the Gaps: Authority and Legality in International Law

Elisa Morgera, The Need for an International Legal Concept of Fair and Equitable Benefit Sharing

David McGrogan, Human Rights Indicators and the Sovereignty of Technique Read the rest of this entry…

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New Issue of EJIL (Vol. 27 (2016) No. 1) Published

Published on April 26, 2016        Author: 

The latest issue of the European Journal of International Law (Vol. 27, No. 1) is out today. As usual, the table of contents of the new issue is available at EJIL’s own website, where readers can access those articles that are freely available without subscription. The free access article in this issue is Charles Leben’s Hebrew Sources in the Doctrine of the Law of Nature and Nations in Early Modern Europe. Subscribers have full access to the latest issue of the journal at EJIL’s Oxford University Press site. Apart from articles published in the last 12 months, EJIL articles are freely available on the EJIL website.

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Ten Good Reads (Vol. 27: 1)

Published on April 25, 2016        Author: 

By the time this issue comes out, it will be more like Easter reading recommendations than Christmas ones. But as is now our custom,  I list 10 of the books I read during the last year which stood out and which I do not hesitate to recommend to our readers. The law books – six in all – are actually all relatively recent. Sebald’s essay and the novels span a century, a pick of some of the best I happened to read during the year. The 10 books are listed in no particular order. Enjoy!

Michaela Hailbronner, Traditions and Transformations: The Rise of German Constitutionalism (Oxford University Press, 2015)

A mature and very readable book (not always the case with German scholarship) by a young scholar, constituting a nice balance between synthesis and analysis of ‘German Constitutionalism’, with a focus on the German Constitutional Court.  Foreshadowed by her 2014 article in I•CON the book is laudably ambitious, providing a history and historiography of court, state, society and the constitutional order. Some of the terrain was covered some years ago by Ulrich Haltern’s striking doctoral dissertation, but the treatment is fresh and her fertile concept of ‘value formalism’ – a kind of Hegelian synthesis of, say,  Mautner’s formalism to values analysis of the Israeli Supreme Court – captures a mood noticeable in other jurisdictions. Hailbronner swims confidently in constitutional (and political) theory, and is both contextual and comparative. The book is Hegelian in another sense – formally beautiful in the construct it sets up and, yes, idealistic in its values. It is German ‘legal science’ in the best sense of the word, which also helps explain the worldwide impact that the German Constitutional Court and its jurisprudence have had, an impact greater than any other such court in continental Europe. That might be its weakness too: the construct a bit too tidy for my taste, the values a bit too much of a legal Heile Welt – but such does not detract from a formidable achievement.

Vittoria Barsotti, Paolo Carozza, Marta Cartabia and Andrea Simoncini,  Italian Constitutional Justice in Global Context (Oxford University Press, 2015)

This is a very different book – a combination in the best sense of a law book and a book about the law – learned and erudite in its descriptive parts, insightful in its analytical part. It is important because so many out there will simply be unaware of Italian constitutionalism, its history, institutions and not least its jurisprudence. I might say, tongue in cheek, that if you read it coupled with Sabino Cassese’s Diary which I recommend below, you will not need to read much more.

Sabino Cassese, Dentro La Corte. Diario di un giudice costituzionale (Il Mulino, 2015) Read the rest of this entry…

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Vital Statistics, EJIL’s Assistant Editors, and With Gratitude- Shirley Wayne (Vol. 27: 1)

Published on April 22, 2016        Author: 

Vital Statistics

As EJIL readers will know, we publish statistics each year on the submissions received, accepted and published in the Journal during the previous 12 months. We call them ‘Vital Statistics’ because we believe that it is vitally important to observe and understand trends in the submission and publication of articles in our Journal: Who is writing, where are manuscripts coming from, which languages do our authors speak, can we detect any changes in submission trends? We present our statistics with no frills, letting them speak for themselves.

There are no special requirements for authors wishing to submit to EJIL. We encourage the new, the innovative, the young and the well-established to submit to EJIL, but there is no editorial affirmative action in selecting manuscripts for publication. Our double-blind review process makes certain of that. Of course, EJIL does commission some articles, and readers will find statistics on the incidence of unsolicited and commissioned articles in our pages here as well.

We have seen a very gradual rise in the percentage of manuscripts submitted and published by women authors in recent years, with the figures now showing that 37 per cent of submissions and published articles for 2015 were by women authors. The number dropped slightly to 31 per cent for accepted articles.

We divide the world into four regions for our statistical purposes: the European Union, the Council of Europe countries outside the EU, the US and Canada, and the rest of the world. This may seem a little misleading as it indicates the place of submission – normally the institution at which authors work or study, rather than their actual nationality – but overall we believe it conveys a fairly reliable picture of our authors and EJIL’s presence in the world. Of the total number of manuscripts submitted in 2015, 44 per cent came from the EU, 8 per cent from CoE countries, 19 per cent from the US and Canada and 29 per cent from the rest of the world; thus, very similar figures to those of the previous year for the first two groups, whilst US and Canadian submissions showed a decline and rest of the world submissions increased. These percentages are closely reflected in the figures for published articles. Only 8 per cent of this year’s authors hail from the US and Canada, though the percentage of accepted articles by North Americans was much higher at 31 per cent. Thus, next year’s statistics may speak differently in this respect. Read the rest of this entry…

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EJIL Foreword and In this Issue (Vol. 27: 1)

Published on April 21, 2016        Author: 

The EJIL Foreword

This issue opens with the second entry under our new annual rubric, The EJIL Foreword. As I explained a year ago, the Foreword is designed to enable a distinguished scholar in our discipline to undertake a sweeping view of the field, a more extensive analysis, synthesis, conceptualization, or systemic theorization than is usually possible in an EJIL article. It is fitting, then, that Robert Howse’s contribution in this issue surveys the first two decades of judicial decision-making and judicialization under the auspices of the World Trade Organization. Howse presents a fresh and fascinating account of this seemingly well-known story, unearthing new insights and creating a new standard point of reference for studies of the WTO Appellate Body. An EJIL: Live interview with Professor Howse, available on our website complements the article.

In this Issue

The Foreword by Robert Howse is followed by four articles. In the first, Charles Leben presents a rich and original historical analysis of the influence of Hebrew sources on the development of international law in early modern Europe. In the second, Andreas Kulick explores the inconsistent use of estoppel in international investment arbitration and the lack of reasoning used to justify the different approaches taken, leading him to conclude that the ‘cart may have come before the horse’ in many of the decisions surveyed. Yoshiko Naiki examines the important but understudied area of international regulatory arrangements around biofuels, in the process making an important contribution towards understanding the functioning of a fragmented governance system with multiple coexisting regimes. Finally, Timothy Meyer adopts a rational choice approach to explain the choice of soft law over binding law forms of agreement, with particular reference to the context of uncertainty and shifting power dynamics in which such decisions are made.

In Roaming Charges, this issue features a photograph by Michael Klode, entitled Halls of Justice: At the African Court on Human and People’s Rights in Arusha, Tanzania.

The last article in this issue appears under our regular rubric, Critical Review of International Jurisprudence: in yet another example of the growing ‘empirical turn’ in international legal studies, Manley Stewart examines referencing patterns at the International Criminal Court.

We end the issue on a light, yet astute, note with The Last Page.  Niccolò Ridi and Sondre Torp Helmersen offer us Public International Limericks and by way of a teaser:

The Function of Law in the International Community

The place of international law and its sources

Is not just in books and university courses

It can actually mute

A protracted dispute

The views expressed here are personal to the Editor-in-Chief and do not reflect the official position of either the European Journal of International Law or the European University Institute.

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New Issue of EJIL (Vol. 27 (2016) No. 1) – Out Next Week

Published on April 21, 2016        Author: 

The latest issue of the European Journal of International Law will be published next week. Over the next few days, we will have a series of posts by Joseph Weiler – Editor in Chief of EJIL. These posts will appear in the Editorial of the upcoming issue. Here is the Table of Contents for this new issue:

Editorial

The EJIL Foreword; 10 Good Reads; Vital Statistics; EJIL’s Assistant Editors; With Gratitude – Shirley Wayne; In this Issue

The EJIL Foreword

Robert Howse, The World Trade Organization 20 Years On:  Global Governance by Judiciary

Articles

Charles Leben, Hebrew Sources in the Doctrine of the Law of Nature and Nations in Early Modern Europe

Andreas Kulick, About the Order of Cart and Horse, Among Other Things: Estoppel in the Jurisprudence of International Investment Arbitration Tribunals

Yoshiko Naiki, Trade and Bioenergy: Explaining and Assessing the Regime Complex for Sustainable Bioenergy

Timothy Meyer, Shifting Sands: Power, Uncertainty and the Form of International Legal Cooperation

Roaming Charges

Michael Klode, The Halls of Justice. At the African Court on Human and People’s Rights in Arusha, Tanzania Read the rest of this entry…

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