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Home Archive for category "EJIL Analysis"

The ‘Internationalization’ of Maritime Disputes in the South China Sea: Environmental Destruction in the High Seas and Threats to the Global Commons

Published on April 28, 2016        Author: 

What does it mean to ‘internationalize’ a maritime dispute? Accusations of ‘internationalization’ of the maritime disputes in the South China Sea have been strident over the past weeks, most recently from the 18 April 2016 Joint Communique of the Foreign Ministers of the Russian Federation, the Republic of India, and the People’s Republic of China, which stressed that “Russia, India and China are committed to maintaining a legal order for the seas and oceans based on the principles of international law, as reflected notably in the UN Convention on the Law of Sea (UNCLOS). All related disputes should be addressed through negotiations and agreements between the parties concerned. In this regard the Ministers called for full respect of all provisions of UNCLOS, as well as the Declaration on the Conduct of Parties in the South China Sea (DOC) and the Guidelines for the implementation of the DOC.” (Joint Communique, para. 21). Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov was also reported to have observed to Chinese media in Moscow during the Russia-China-India April 2016 trilateral summit that “[attempts to internationalize the issue] are completely counterproductive. Only negotiations, which China and the ASEAN are pursuing, can bring the desired result; namely, mutually acceptable agreements” – a sentiment echoed by Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi who was also reported to have voiced his opposition to the ‘internationalization’ of the South China Sea dispute on the basis of the Philippines’ “unilaterally-proposed arbitration case”. Chinese President Xi Jinping reiterated the call for negotiations only between the states involved, reportedly implying  nations outside the region such as the United States have “no role in regional disputes”.  The Russia-China-India trilateral statement came one week after the G7 Summit in Hiroshima, Japan, yielded the April 11, 2016 G7 Foreign Ministers’ Statement on Maritime Security, which stated, among others, that the G7 “express[es]… strong opposition to any intimidating, coercive or provocative unilateral actions that could alter the status quo and increase tensions, and urge all states to refrain from such actions as land reclamations including large scale  ones, building of outposts, as well as their use for military purposes and to act in accordance with international law including the principles of freedoms of navigation and overflight. In areas pending final delimitation, we underline the importance of coastal states refraining from unilateral actions that cause permanent physical change to the marine environment insofar as such actions jeopardize or hamper the reaching of the final agreement, as well as the importance of making every effort to enter into provisional arrangements of a practical nature, in those areas.” (G7 Statement, para. 5).   Read the rest of this entry…

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Thou shalt not Insult the (Foreign) Head of State?

Published on April 28, 2016        Author: 

Earlier this month, a German prosecutor’s office confirmed that it was investigating TV comedian, Jan Böhmermann, for having read on his TV show, Neo Magazin Royal, a poem targeting the Turkish President Erdogan (see here or here). The poem, entitled “Schmähkritik” (“Defamatory”), accused Mr Erdogan of deliberately suppressing minorities such as Kurds and Christians. As the comedian himself admitted, the language used was deliberately offensive- it contained sexually explicit insults against the Turkish president (and was read in front of the Turkish flag and a portrait of Mr. Erdogan).

The Böhmermann Case

The TV show stirred fierce criticism from the Turkish capital of Ankara. The Turkish Embassy in Berlin lodged a formal request with the German Ministry of Foreign Affairs for the prosecution of Mr Böhmermann. The prosecution could take place under Article 103 of the German Criminal Code entitled “Defamation of organs and representatives of foreign states”. This provision reads as follows:

 (1) Whosoever insults a foreign head of state, or, with respect to his position, a member of a foreign government who is in Germany in his official capacity, or a head of a foreign diplomatic mission who is accredited in the Federal territory shall be liable to imprisonment not exceeding three years or a fine, in case of a slanderous insult to imprisonment from three months to five years.

Pursuant to Article 104a of the German Criminal Code, prosecution of this offence would require the following conditions to be met: the Federal Republic of Germany maintains diplomatic relations with the other state; reciprocity is guaranteed and was guaranteed at the time of the offence; a request to prosecute by the foreign government exists; and the Federal Government authorises the prosecution.

The first three conditions are clearly present in the Böhmermann case – Germany maintains diplomatic relations with Turkey; the combination of Article 125 (Insult) and Article 340 (Offences against the Head of a Foreign State) of the Penal Code of Turkey would allow for the criminal prosecution of persons who insult the German head of state in Turkey; and Turkey has requested the prosecution.

Originally, securing authorisation for the prosecution from the German Federal Government was less than certain. In some previous cases involving the alleged insult of Mr. Erdogan (the NDR Case), authorisation had been denied. In the current case however, the Government, after some initial hesitation, decided to grant it. Thus, the case will go forward alongside a civil lawsuit for defamation filed by Mr. Erdogan himself.

While interesting in itself, the case gives rise to a more general question relating to the level of protection provided to heads of state under current international law. Should heads of state, as is the situation with other public officials, be expected to withstand even harsh political criticism, thus being effectively subject to a lower level of protection than common citizens? Or on the contrary, should heads of state be granted a higher level of protection in so far as they represent the state and could therefore be considered one of its symbols? Read the rest of this entry…

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“Are you smarter than Professor Hawking?” Higher Forces and Gut-Feelings in the Debate on Lethal Autonomous Weapons Systems

Published on April 27, 2016        Author: 

“Professor Hawking says that artificial intelligence without control may cause the extinction of the human race”, noted a Chinese delegate following a session on ‘mapping autonomy’ at the Convention on Conventional Weapons (CCW) meeting of experts which took place from 11-15 April 2016 at the United Nations in Geneva. The CCW convened its third meeting of experts to continue discussions on questions related to emerging technologies in the area of lethal autonomous weapons systems (LAWS) and I had the privilege of participating.

LAWS are most often described as weapons that are capable of selecting and attacking targets without human intervention; one of the key questions addressed at the meeting was what exactly this means. According to most of the commentators present at the meeting, LAWS do not yet exist however, the possibility of using autonomous weapons in targeting decisions raises multidisciplinary questions that touch upon moral and ethical, legal, policy, security and technical issues. The meeting addressed all of these, starting with the technical session aimed at mapping autonomy.

Without expressing their position on a ban, the six technical experts on the panel presented a nuanced view of the state of current autonomous weapons technology and the road that lies ahead. The Chinese were one of the first delegations to respond to the panel and the delegate seemed startled; some of what was said seemed to contradict the conclusions reached by Professor Hawking et al. China read the Open Letter issued by the Future of Life Institute (FLI) and signed by thousands of artificial intelligence (AI) and robotics researchers, as well as by a number of other endorsers including the well-known Professor Stephen Hawking. The Open Letter calls for a ban on offensive autonomous weapons beyond meaningful human control, claiming that these weapons would be feasible within years, not decades. The Open Letter attracted a good deal of attention, largely because it is signed by a number of well-regarded figures including, Tesla CEO Elon Musk, Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak and as previously mentioned, Professor Stephen Hawking.

The expert panelists offered some divergent views on the claims and predictions made in the Open Letter. In response to these, China asked the panelists “do you think you are smarter than Professor Hawking?” A number of delegates, academics, NGO members and panelists seemed quite amused by the provocative question posed by China. Who dares to disagree with Hawking? Fortunately, some of the experts did. “Isn’t Hawking a physicist, and not an AI expert?”, asked one panelist. Another expert confidently said, “Yes, I am smarter than Stephen Hawking.” Why? “Because, like Plato, I know that I do not know.” The debate is amusing, but also a little bit troublesome. What is the effect of well-regarded figures on the discourse about autonomous weapon systems? Read the rest of this entry…

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Filed under: Arms Control, EJIL Analysis
 

The Russian Constitutional Court and its Actual Control over the ECtHR Judgement in Anchugov and Gladkov

Published on April 26, 2016        Author: 

The amendment to the law on the Constitutional Court of the Russian Federation which came into force on 14 December 2015 gave the Constitutional Court the power to declare “impossible to implement” judgements of a human rights body on the ground that its interpretation of the international treaty provisions at the basis of the judgement is inconsistent with the Constitution of the Russian Federation. As observed by Philip Leach and Alice Donald, even if the main objective of the law was to target judgements of the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR), its scope is wider and covers decisions from any human rights body, including the UN Human Rights Committee. No equivalent powers exist under the national jurisdiction of any other Council of Europe (CoE) member state.

Russia’s Constitutional Court has recently ruled that it was “impossible to implement” the final judgement of the ECtHR delivered on 4 July 2013 in the case of Anchugov and Gladkov v. Russia. In this case, the ECtHR held that Russia’s blanket ban on convicted prisoners’ voting rights was incompatible with the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR). The applicants brought the case because, according to Article 32(3) of the Russian Constitution, they were ineligible to vote in parliamentary and presidential elections given their status as convicted prisoners.

This post discusses and criticises the ‘freshly exercised’ competence of the Russian Constitutional Court, in particular, from the standpoint of public international law. Read the rest of this entry…

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A Comment on Croatia’s Concerns over Serbia’s So-Called “Mini-Hague”

Published on April 22, 2016        Author: 

As recently reported, Croatia has blocked the opening of Chapters 23 and 24 of the accession negotiations between Serbia and the European Union (EU). One of the reasons given relates to Serbia’s law establishing the jurisdiction of Serbian prosecutors and courts over war crimes committed anywhere on the territory of the former Yugoslavia. Justifying their actions, Croatian officials have said that Serbia must follow “European standards”, with some Croatian officials and media reports referring to Serbia’s extension of jurisdiction as the creation of a “mini-Hague” (a media report in Serbo-Croatian is available here). Croatia has asserted that such jurisdiction is incompatible with international law and that it actually constitutes a “hybrid”, rather than universal, jurisdiction (available here in Serbo-Croatian). From the perspective of States whose national legislation provides for universal jurisdiction over international crimes, the issues arising here are quite interesting.

The involvement of the European Commission and its request that the Croatian government cease its opposition has added further complexity to the matter. In a ‘non-paper’, the European Commission has expressed its opinion that the arguments advanced by Croatia are not justified. Commenting on the document, a Croatian official has described it as an old document meant for internal use, and one that the Croatian public should not be bothered with.

Jurisdiction over Croatian Nationals

Croatia’s criticism seems to be aimed at the statutory provisions themselves. In particular, Croatia takes issue with Article 3 of the Serbian Law on Organization and Jurisdiction of State Organs in War Crimes Proceedings, which provides:

The government authorities of the Republic of Serbia set out under this Law shall have jurisdiction in proceedings for criminal offences specified in Article 2 hereof, committed on the territory of the former Socialist Federative Republic of Yugoslavia, regardless of the citizenship of the perpetrator or victim. (An older English version of the law is available here; the quoted provision remains unchanged.)

Croatia thus appears concerned with the possibility of Serbia exercising its jurisdiction over Croatian nationals. No accusations of discriminatory or systematic prosecutions by Serbian prosecutors against Croatian nationals have been advanced by Croatia.  To date, universal jurisdiction has not been extensively used to prosecute foreign nationals for war crimes allegedly perpetrated in the Yugoslav conflict; reported cases include both an acquittal and a rejection of a request for extradition (for the reason of an allegedly politically motivated process) of two Bosnians. In 2015, a Croatian national sentenced in Serbia for war crimes was transferred to serve his sentence in Croatia.

Compliance with “European Standards” and International Law

The Croatian government is targeting a particular statutory provision, which in its opinion, marks Serbia’s intention to act as a “regional policeman”. Read the rest of this entry…

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Killing by Omission

Published on April 20, 2016        Author: 

On Monday, the Forensic Architecture team at Goldsmith College, London, published Death by Rescue. The report exposes a rather complex set of facts, but the basic argument is as simple as it is alarming.

Operation Triton, facilitated by Europe’s border security agency, Frontex, began on 1 November 2014 and is mandated to enforce Italy’s maritime border. Triton replaced an earlier and much wider Italian Navy operation, Mare Nostrum, which began in October 2013 and was mandated to save migrant lives beyond Italy’s territorial waters. When EU officials decided on the more limited scope of Triton, they knew their decision would result in the drowning of numerous migrants. As one Frontex official wryly noted, “the withdrawal of naval assets from the area, if not properly planned and announced well in advance, would likely result in a higher number of fatalities.” But the European Commission turned a blind eye – leading to a spike in migrant deaths, which the authors, Charles Heller and Lorenzo Pezzani meticulously document.

From a legal perspective, this set of circumstances raises the question whether the migrants’ rights were violated, and if so, whether EU actors can be held legally accountable. In my view, the report exposes no illegal activity by European agents, either at the operational or at the policymaking level. Perhaps more troubling, the report raises the specter of unaccountable violence ingrained in the very structure of international law. If international law is somehow to blame for circumstances that made these utterly preventable deaths possible, then perhaps it is law itself that should be indicted.

Law of the Land, Law of the Sea

To explain what I mean by that, several rather theoretical remarks are required.

In common law countries, one of the first things law students learn is that law imposes no duties of rescue upon individuals qua individuals.  The classical jurisprudence on this includes comically macabre examples. A characteristic hypothetical describes a bystander witnessing a drowning baby. Law professors often use the initially astonishing absence of a duty of rescue to illustrate a basic tenet of legal positivism: the distinction between legal and moral prescription (or “the separation thesis”). Students are expected to adopt this distinction as a second nature. Rescuing the drowning stranger, they are comforted, is morally required. Of course, there are important exceptions to the general absence of a duty of recue. The basic point nevertheless stands: law does not impose a duty of rescue. Law does not always follow moral prescription. Read the rest of this entry…

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The EU-Turkey Statement: A Treaty That Violates Democracy (Part 2 of 2)

Published on April 19, 2016        Author: 

In yesterday’s post, I discussed why the EU-Turkey joint statement should be regarded as a treaty under international law, replete with consequences on EU Member States as a matter of international law.  In this concluding post, I argue that EU Parliamentary prerogatives were violated in the substance of this agreement and the manner by which such agreement was reached.

…That Violates the Parliament’s Prerogatives

Since the 18 March statement is an international agreement binding on the Union, it should have been adopted, on the EU’s side, on the basis of Article 218 TFEU. This provision never mentions the European Council: it is the Council that authorises the opening of negotiations and that concludes (i.e. ratifies) them. More importantly, Article 218(6) TFEU stipulates that, in most cases, the Council may conclude an agreement only after obtaining the consent of the European Parliament.

The Parliament’s consent is required, in particular, when the international agreement covers fields to which the ordinary legislative procedure applies. This is the case of the 18 March statement, which concerns the readmission of citizens of third countries (although the statement does not explicitly mention the word ‘readmission’, it clearly refers to this concept, cf. the definition of ‘readmission’ in the EU-Turkey readmission agreement, Article 1). The EU’s competence to enter into readmission agreements is explicitly acknowledged by Article 79 TFEU, which regulates the EU’s ‘common immigration policy’. In this field, the ordinary legislative procedure applies (ex Article 79(2) TFEU). Hence, pursuant to Article 218(6) TFEU, the Council may conclude readmission agreements only after having obtained the consent of the European Parliament. The EU-Turkey readmission agreement was indeed concluded after having obtained the consent of the European Parliament – but that was not the case for the 18 March statement.

One may wonder whether the statement, by virtue of its specific features, could have been legitimately concluded in the form of an ‘executive agreement’, that does not require Parliamentary approval. It would seem, in fact, that EU institutions sometimes enter into executive agreements with foreign authorities, especially for the management of relatively ‘technical’ issues, such as the establishment of EU Delegations or the conduct of relations with international organisations. Be that as it may, I would argue that a readmission agreement cannot be concluded as an ‘executive agreement’. This argument is supported by a literal and systematic reading of the TFEU. Readmission agreements (envisaged by Article 79(3)) can be concluded only after having obtained the consent of the Parliament (Article 218(6)), since the ordinary legislative procedure applies in this area (Article 79(2)). If an EU institution could enter into a readmission agreement through another procedure, Article 218(6) would be deprived of its content.

The importance of the letter of Article 218(6) is reinforced by the case-law of the Court of Justice. According to an established jurisprudence, Article 218 TFEU ‘constitutes, as regards the conclusion of international treaties, an autonomous and general provision of constitutional scope, in that it confers specific powers on the EU institutions’ (Negotiating directives, para 62). Since Article 218(6) establishes a balance between the Council and the Parliament, the adoption of agreements in the simplified form, such as the 18 March statement, tips the balance against the Parliament. This can hardly be accepted: the Parliament’s involvement in the treaty-making area ‘is the reflection, at EU level, of the fundamental democratic principle that the people should participate in the exercise of power through the intermediary of a representative assembly’ (Mauritius, para 81).

It emerges from the above considerations that the 18 March statement was concluded in infringement of the Parliament’s prerogatives, and is consequently vitiated by violation of the essential procedural requirements imposed by Article 218(6) TFEU.

Conclusion

The EU-Turkey statement of 18 March appears criticisable for several reasons. Not only is it ethically questionable and problematic in terms of human rights protection, but it also challenges the democratic principles on which the EU is founded. The good news is that this statement might be subject to judicial review. Being a binding act, vitiated by violation of essential procedural requirements, the agreement may possibly be annulled under the procedure of Article 263 TFEU (cf. France v Commission, paras 16-17). It is also possible, at least in principle, that the agreement may be incompatible with substantive primary rules, notably those concerning fundamental rights protection.

If the Court of Justice is to review the legality of the 18 March statement, someone must obviously bring action against it. The European Parliament is the ideal candidate. Hopefully, (some of) its members might be more sensitive to humanitarian concerns than the governments of EU States. The European Parliament may also wish to defend the democratic principle at large, since they constitute the basis of its own legimacy. Moreover, the Parliament has an interest in protecting its own prerogatives: there is indeed the risk that the Member States, left to their own devices, may decide to ignore Article 218(6) TFEU in the future, too.

The Parliament may perhaps be tempted to turn a blind eye to the 18 March statement, to avoid exposing itself to criticism. The EU-Turkey deal is a hot potato that politicians are likely to avoid, if at all possible: political and legal uncertainty may seem preferable in the short term. Backroom deals of this sort are not uncommon in the history of the EU, but, in my view, they are no longer acceptable. If the EU’s democratic deficit is to be filled, political leaders – notably, the members of the European Parliament – should take responsibility for the EU’s actions. That is especially the case when the lives of thousands of people are at stake. Not only does the Parliament have a right to bring action against the 18 March statement, but it has also a moral duty to do so.

The annulment of the 18 March statement may not have immediate consequences, since it would hardly prevent Greece from considering asylum-seekers’ applications as ‘inadmissible’ and, ultimately, from sending them back to Turkey. The annulment of the 18 March statement may nonetheless serve a twofold purpose. It would draw attention to the consequences of statement, in terms of human rights protection and democratic governance. It may also contribute to stigmatise the action of the Member States, thereby discouraging them from seeking similar solutions in the future. The recent non-paper on readmission to Afghanistan, that prefigures the deportation of 80.000 people, suggests that further ‘questionable’ agreements may be on their way.

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Filed under: EJIL Analysis
 

The EU-Turkey Statement: A Treaty That Violates Democracy (Part 1 of 2)

Published on April 18, 2016        Author: 

While the terrorist attacks in Brussels understandably attracted most of the attention during the last weeks, migration issues, and particularly the situation in Greece and Turkey, remain high on the EU’s agenda. The EU and Turkey recently stepped-up their cooperation in migration matters by adopting a joint statement, that soon appeared questionable in terms of international and European asylum law (Chetail 2016; Labayle and de Bruycker 2016; Mandal 2016; Peers 2016; Roman 2016). Through this contribution, I intend to demonstrate that the EU-Turkey statement is problematic also because of another reason: it was adopted in violation of the European Parliament’s powers and of the democratic principle at large. Therefore, the Parliament has the right, and the moral duty, to bring action against the statement before the Court of Justice.

Bad for Refugees

Both Turkey and the EU are concerned by the migratory crisis prompted, inter alia, by the Syrian civil war. They have negotiated a number of instruments during the last few months, including a Joint Action Plan in October 2015 and a statement on 7 March 2016. The cooperation framework was completed on 18 March, through the adoption of a joint statement, which took effect on 20 March.

Through the latter statement, Turkey committed to readmit migrants who have not applied for asylum in Greece or whose application has been found ‘inadmissible’ or unfounded under the EU’s Asylum Procedures Directive. On the other hand, the EU accepted that, for every Syrian being returned to Turkey from Greek islands, a Syrian will be resettled from Turkey to the EU (the so-called ‘1:1 scheme’), with a maximum of 72.000 persons. The EU also committed to accelerate the visa liberalisation for Turkish citizens and to ‘speed up’ the disbursement of 3 billion euros allocated under the Facility for Refugees in Turkey (a fund constituted by the EU and its Members, which provides humanitarian assistance to refugees in Turkey and their host communities).

It has been argued that the 18 March statement is ‘Kafkaesque’ and ‘morally wrong’ (ECRE 2016), because it sets up a ‘trade in human misery’ (Peers 2016). The statement may also run afoul of European and international law, since it might lead to collective expulsions and may not give asylum-seekers an effective opportunity to apply for international protection in the EU. If Greece defined Turkey as a ‘safe third country’, it would be able to consider any application for international protection by asylum-seekers transiting through Turkey as ‘inadmissible’, after a simple interview (see Articles 33, 34 and 38 of the Asylum Procedures Directive). It would seem that Greece indeed considers Turkey as a ‘safe third country’ (see Commission’s 10 February Communication, footnote 38). Hence, Greece may send back to Turkey any asylum-seeker whose application it considers to be ‘inadmissible’ – that is, virtually any asylum-seeker.

Read the rest of this entry…

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Filed under: EJIL Analysis
 

ECtHR Armani Da Silva v UK: Unreasonable Police Killings in Putative Self-defence?

Published on April 14, 2016        Author: 

Two weeks after the London public transport bombings of 7 July 2005, British law enforcement mistook the Brazilian electrician Jean Charles de Menezes for another suicide bomber. As he entered a subway carriage, specialist firearms officers killed him with a series of head shots in the mistaken belief that he was about to set off a bomb. The government’s Independent Police Complaints Commission determined that de Menezes was killed due to “very serious mistakes” that were avoidable. The London Metropolitan Police was prosecuted under the Health and Safety Act 1974 and convicted to pay a GBP 175,000 fine. Compensation claims by the family were settled through an ex gratia payment.

However, de Menezes’ family still brought the case to the European Court of Human Rights since none of the individual officers implicated in the killing were prosecuted. In Armani da Silva v. United Kingdom, the Court’s Grand Chamber has just held that the United Kingdom did not fail to uphold its procedural obligation under the right to life (Art. 2 ECHR) to effectively investigate the de Menezes shooting and prosecute the individual officers involved.

One of the central legal points of the judgment concerns the standards that human rights law establishes for handling killings in putative self-defence, where an attack exists only according to the mistaken belief of the law enforcement officer using force against the presumed attacker. Arguably, the Armani da Silva judgment got the standards wrong. Read the rest of this entry…

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Kosovo’s Membership in the PCA: Some comments on Professor Zimmermann’s post

Published on April 13, 2016        Author: 

It was nice to read Professor Zimmermann’s post on the issue of membership of Palestine and Kosovo in the Permanent Court of Arbitration (PCA), as this matter should get more attention from the community of international lawyers. I have already dealt with some of the relevant legal issues in an ESIL Reflection of 11 March 2016 which Professor Milanović has kindly referred to in a comment to Professor Zimmermann’s post. I would like to use this opportunity to engage with some issues raised by Professor Zimmermann, namely: whether the Netherlands should have raised proprio motu the issue of Kosovo’s accession to the 1907 Convention; whether there has been an ‘entente ulterieure’ among the member States of the PCA; what are the powers of the PCA Administrative Council and what is the value of its decision of 4 January 2016, and; what is the way forward concerning Kosovo’s accession to the 1907 Convention.

Calling a meeting of the PCA Administrative Council proprio motu

There was no need for the Netherlands as State depositary to raise proprio motu the matter of Kosovo’s accession to the 1907 Convention within the framework of the PCA Administrative Council. Any State who had an issue with Kosovo’s accession could have called for a meeting of the Administrative Council, even at short notice, like Serbia did, albeit not being a party to the 1907 Convention. Also, it must be noted that by the time of the 4 January 2016 meeting of the PCA Administrative Council, only three out of the 116 Member States of the PCA, namely Russia, Serbia and Mexico seemed to have raised an issue concerning Kosovo’s membership in the PCA. Finally, given that more than half of the member States of the PCA recognize Kosovo as an independent State, there was no need for the Netherlands to raise this issue proprio motu.

Entente ultérieure among PCA member States

Contrary to what Professor Zimmermann claims, there has been no ‘entente ultérieure’ along the lines of Article 60 of the 1899 Convention and Article 94 of the 1907 Convention. The December 1959 agreement among the PCA member States simply authorized the Government of the Netherlands, as State depositary, to send an invitation to new members of the United Nations which were not yet a party to the PCA or whose membership position was unclear. The aim was to increase the membership of the PCA. The document to which Professor Zimmermann refers to as ‘UN support’ is a Study prepared by the Secretariat in 1968 concerning the succession of States to multilateral treaties. Read the rest of this entry…

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