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Home Articles posted by Pedro A. Villarreal

Public International Law and the 2018-2019 Ebola Outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo

Published on August 1, 2019        Author: 

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On 17 July, 2019, the World Health Organization (WHO)’s Director-General declared, under Article 12 of the International Health Regulations (IHR), that the Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) constitutes a Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC). The declaration took place after an Emergency Committee issued its advice in the same sense.

The aftermath of the PHEIC declaration has given way to questions about what exactly its implications –legal and otherwise– are. Some of the general features of PHEICs are described elsewhere. In turn, this post provides a closer look at the underlying legal regime of the IHR, with an emphasis on provisions related to the declaration of a PHEIC. Afterwards, a brief account of the current situation in the DRC Ebola outbreak is provided. Lastly, some of the potential consequences, legal and otherwise, of a PHEIC declaration are discussed.  

The Legal Regime of PHEICs

The IHR were approved at the 58th World Health Assembly in 2005, in accordance with Article 21 of the Constitution of the WHO. This provision gives the World Health Assembly the authority to issue regulations, inter alia, in the subject of “procedures designed to prevent the international spread of disease”. Notably, the IHR do not require further ratification by states to enter into force, rather only a two-thirds majority vote in the World Health Assembly (Article 60a Constitution of the WHO). Regulations adopted under this procedure become binding for all WHO Member States, with the exception of those which explicitly “opt out”. The IHR entered into force in 2007, and are currently binding for all 194 WHO Member States and Liechtenstein. Read the rest of this entry…

Filed under: EJIL Analysis
 

The Renegotiated “NAFTA”: What Is In It for Labor Rights?

Published on October 11, 2018        Author:  and

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On 1 October 2018, the draft text of the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (Draft USMCA), the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA)’s successor, was published on the official website of the United States Trade Representative. The Agreement has still some way to go though, including extensive legal ‘scrubbing’ by national authorities and, most importantly, approval by the corresponding national legislatures, which is likely to give rise to intense controversies. Much of the debate surrounding the Agreement so far has revolved around its labor implications, with US Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer stating that the renegotiations’ objective was, among others, “to better serve the interests of our workers”.

Against this backdrop, this post takes a look at the Draft USMCA’s labor rights dimension. It analyzes the Draft USMCA’s Labor Chapter and also reviews certain other chapters that are relevant from a labor rights perspective. The main argument is that, while the Draft USMCA entails some interesting legal innovations, the opportunity to address the main structural problems of US trade agreements to date in terms oflabor rights has largely been missed.

What is new in Draft USMCA’s Labor Chapter?

When the NAFTA was adopted in 1993, one of its novelties was the accompanying labor side agreement, which is still in force. At its core, it required parties to enforce their own domestic labor law, set up a Commission for Labor Cooperation, and established a complaint mechanism for third parties. It also allowed, in certain cases, for state-to-state arbitral dispute settlement with possibilities to impose limited fines as a last resort measure. The fate of NAFTA’s labor side agreement, which the Draft USMCA, as it stands, does not refer to, remains unclear.

Read the rest of this entry…

 
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