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Crimea’s Declaration of Independence

Published on March 18, 2014        Author: 

The referendum on Crimea’s secession from Ukraine and on the subsequently planned accession to the Russian Federation has produced the expected results. An overwhelming majority has voted against Crimea remaining part of the state of Ukraine. Already one day after the referendum, the Supreme National Council of Crimea has declared the independence of Crimea and requested other states to recognize it as an independent sovereign state. And today Russia and Crimea signed an agreement on Crimea’s accession to the Russian Federation. Crimean and Russian authorities seek to justify their actions under international law, especially by reference to the International Court of Justice’s advisory opinion on Kosovo. In a statement of March 11, 2014, the Supreme Council of Crimea proclaimed that it is acting “with regard to the charter of the United Nations and a whole range of other international documents and taking into consideration the confirmation of the status of Kosovo by the United Nations International Court of Justice on July, 22, 2010, which says that unilateral declaration of independence by a part of the country doesn’t violate any international norms.” (link to press report) How do these claims hold under international law?

In evaluating the significance of the ICJ’s advisory opinion to Crimea it is important to highlight that the opinion only had a very limited scope. It did not answer the question whether Kosovo had a right to secession under international law, it did not address the question whether there is a general entitlement to secession; nor did it answer the question of the legal consequences of the declaration of independence or whether Kosovo has become an independent state. Rather, the opinion is limited to an analysis of the legality of the declaration itself (I.C.J. Reports 2010, para. 51, 56).

The Kosovo opinion relies on a brief review of norms of international law, which – as the ICJ concludes – do not generally prohibit unilateral declarations of independence. The principle of territorial integrity only applies in the relations between states, but not in regard to internal secessionist movements. However, the ICJ mentions a situation in which unilateral declarations of independence can nevertheless be in violation of international law, namely where they “were, or would have been, connected with the unlawful use of force or other egregious violations of norms of general international law, in particular those of a peremptory character (ius cogens)” (ibid. para. 81). The violation of international law then does not stem from the unilateral character of the declaration of independence, but from its reliance on the violation of a peremptory norm of international law.

In regard to Crimea, the declaration of independence would have been impossible without Russian troops backing up the steps towards secession. Only the fact that Ukrainian forces on Crimea have been locked in their posts and that the public infrastructure has been taken over by pro-Russian forces made it possible to hold the referendum on which the declaration of independence is based. It can therefore hardly be argued that the declaration would not rely on the use of force. According to the criteria elaborated in the ICJ’s advisory opinion, if that use of force was illegal, so was the declaration of independence.

A further question is whether Crimea has a substantive right to secession under international law. Crimean authorities refer to the UN Charter and rely on the principle of self-determination (Article 1 (2) UN Charter) which, as they argue, would assign them a right to secession. Such a claim is also not supported by international law. State practice is very reluctant to acknowledge a right to secession, since states fear that their own territorial integrity might be endangered by an empowerment of secessionist groups. Indicative for the traditional position on the right to self-determination is General Assembly Resolution 2625 (1970). After acknowledging the right to self-determination this resolution stresses that such acknowledgment may not “be construed as authorizing or encouraging any action which would dismember or impair, totally or in part, the territorial integrity or political unity of sovereign and independent States” as long as those states internally respect the right to self-determination of peoples. The right to self-determination requires states to respect minority rights, but does not grant a sub-entity of states the right to freely chose to which state a territory shall belong. Self-determination is usually limited to internal measures, such as the right to be granted a certain status of autonomy within a state. Although one might certainly argue about the necessary degree of autonomy, it is important to highlight that Crimea already had the status of an autonomous republic under Ukraine’s constitution. In principle, the institutional arrangements for implementing the right to self-determination were in place.

The legal situation in regard to the self-determination of Crimea is therefore rather clear. But, as Nico Krisch has pointed out on this blog, the more formal, traditional norms of international law have come under pressure from what he calls liberal interventionism. In regard to self-determination, Western states have created such pressure, for example, when recognizing Kosovo as an independent state immediately after its declaration of independence in 2008. Those who argued for these exemptions referred to the history of internal conflict and the human rights violations that preceded Kosovo’s declaration of independence. A comparable history of conflict does not exist in Crimea, but since the concept of self-determination has been expanded in the past when it seemed opportune, it is not surprising that secessionist movements try to push the limits even more. Since Russia is powerful enough to pursue its interests anyway, it does not need an ultimately convincing legal justification. A justification that is at least not totally absurd, but somehow arguable, is already good enough for making a case in the international political sphere. In expanding the right to self-determination in regard to Kosovo, Western states bear their share of responsibility in enabling such arguments and in undermining international law.

 
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