magnify
Home Articles posted by Arman Sarvarian

Arbitration between Croatia and Slovenia: Leaks, Wiretaps, Scandal (Part 4)

Published on May 3, 2016        Author: 

Some six months since the publication of the third post on the Croatia v. Slovenia arbitration, as Bernard Woolley might say, ‘there has been movement’. To recapitulate, following Croatia’s note verbale of 24 July 2015 informing Slovenia and the Tribunal of its intention to terminate the Arbitration Agreement, Slovenia tendered its objection dated 13 August. In the aftermath of the successive resignations of the arbitrator of Slovenian nationality (Dr Jernej Sekolec) on 23 July, the arbitrator of Croatian nationality (Professor Budislav Vukas) on 30 July, and the replacement arbitrator for Sekolec (President Ronny Abraham of the ICJ) on 3 August, the Tribunal invited the parties to appoint replacements for Vukas and Abraham. Croatia declined to name a replacement, whereas Slovenia wrote to the Tribunal that, ‘in order to preserve the integrity, independence and impartiality of the Arbitral Tribunal and the ongoing proceedings, it will refrain from appointing a member of the Tribunal to replace Judge Abraham’. Instead, Slovenia requested ‘the President of the Arbitration Tribunal, Judge Gilbert Guillaume, in exercise of his powers under Article 2, paragraph 2, of the Arbitration Agreement, to appoint a member of the Tribunal’. In a press release dated 25 September, the Tribunal announced:

Since neither Party made an appointment within 15 days after the resignation of Professor Vukas and Judge Abraham, it fell to the President to appoint the remaining two members of the Tribunal. [Professor Nicolas Michel, of Swiss nationality] was appointed to succeed Professor Vukas on the Tribunal, and [H.E. Ambassador Rolf Fife, of Norwegian nationality] was appointed to succeed Judge Abraham. The Tribunal now intends to consider the Parties’ positions carefully, including in respect of the effect of Croatia’s stated intention to terminate the Arbitration Agreement and in respect of the possible implications for the present proceedings of the events reportedly underlying Croatia’s decision. In this regard, the Tribunal may invite further submissions from the Parties on questions of fact and law as may be necessary.

It is noteworthy that, for the first time in the history of the arbitration, the panel is now ‘wholly neutral’ in that all of the arbitrators are nationals of neither party. Although this appears to have eventuated faute de mieux, it is attractive on a systemic level, as covered in our last post.  

On 2 December, the Tribunal fixed deadlines for further submissions on the aforementioned issues. On 14 March, the Tribunal announced that it had fixed 17 March as the date for hearings on the matter, to be held (understandably) in camera pursuant to Article 6(5) of the Arbitration Agreement with a summary of the Parties’ positions to be published via press release. On the ground, tensions have been escalated by the decision of Slovenia to run a barbed wire fence along part of the disputed territory (see here). Reactions in Croatia, likening these actions to the Nazi occupation of the area during the Second World War, have not helped to ease tensions Read the rest of this entry…

 

Nada v. Switzerland: The Continuing Problem of Attribution of Conduct Taken Pursuant to Security Council Resolutions.

Published on September 25, 2012        Author: 

Dr Arman Sarvarian, Lecturer in Law at the University of Surrey specialising in public international law particularly ethical standards for counsel appearing before international courts and tribunals.

Editors’ Note: This post was originally a comment on the post by Marko but we have decided to move it up

One of the many interesting issues raised by the recent judgment of the European Court of Human Rights in Nada v. Switzerland is attribution of responsibility (point 2 in Marko’s earlier post on this decision). I would like to offer a few tentative thoughts on the handling of attribution of responsibility by the Court. In my view, the judgment appears to have continued a muddled and inconsistent line of cases dealing with the attribution to Member States and/or international organisations concerning conduct pursuant to UN Security Council resolutions or other joint operations under the aegis of an international organisation such as NATO or the EU (e.g. – Bosphorus v. Ireland, Behrami and Saramati v. France and others, Beric v. Bosnia and Herzegovina, Al-Jedda v. United Kingdom, Al-Skeini v. United Kingdom, Bankovic v. Belgium and others).  Of course, the rules of attribution for international organisations remain nebulous and a delicate work in progress but the Court’s handling could be improved. I should emphasise that I am working on a draft conference paper on the potential consequences of EU accession to the ECHR for the law of international responsibility focusing on Common Foreign and Security Policy operations pursuant to UN Security Council resolutions, so my comments here are jejune and tentative.

The respondent argued that the application was inadmissible ratione personae and ratione materiae because the impugned measures had been based upon Security Council Resolutions 1267 (1999) et seq. which, per Articles 25 and 103 of the UN Charter, were binding and prevailed over any international agreement. This argument, and even more so that of France as intervener, used both ‘hierarchy of norms’ and ‘attribution’ language. On the one hand, obligations emanating from Security Council resolutions displace obligations arising under the Convention by virtue of Articles 25(2) and 103 of the Charter (cf. Lockerbie). On this approach, there could have been no infringement of Convention rights because those rights were displaced with respect to this applicant. On the other hand, the same obligations arising out of the resolutions rendered the alleged infringement of the applicant’s Convention rights attributable to the UN and thus, per the ‘Monetary Gold principle’, inadmissible ratione personae before the Court. This was the outcome of the much-criticised Behrami and Saramati decision.

The Court’s analysis (at paras 117-123) appears to skirt the problem of attribution. Read the rest of this entry…

 
 Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
Comments Off on Nada v. Switzerland: The Continuing Problem of Attribution of Conduct Taken Pursuant to Security Council Resolutions.