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The Transformation of International Organizations Law

Published on August 18, 2015        Author: 

The law of international organizations, governing such topics as their powers, their membership rules, and their privileges and immunities, is dominated by a single theoretical perspective: the theory of functionalism. Yet for all its importance, functionalism as a theory has always remained under-explored and, so to speak, under-theorized. Relatively little is known about how functionalism is structured and how, in turn, it structures the law; relatively little is known about how it came about or how it developed over the years, and little attention has been paid to its strengths and weaknesses, both as normative theory and as explanatory theory.

My article, the first EJIL Foreword, aims to take stock of functionalism by delving precisely into the above-mentioned questions, and in doing so reflects the culmination of almost two decades of study and perhaps, some might say, obsession. The article’s three main parts discuss the nature of functionalism, its genesis, and its relative fall from grace, and while there is no main conclusion to be drawn (in that the piece describes and analyzes an ongoing process of transformation), some of its main points can be summarized as follows.

First, I contend that functionalism is a special kind of principal-agent theory, special in the sense that the principal is by definition collective, and special in the sense that the principal is invariably part of the agent: all organizations have a plenary organ in which the member states (the principal) are represented. One important ramification hereof is that functionalism is ill-equipped to address issues that do not emerge from the relationship between principal and agent or, or more colloquial terms, between organization and members. I identify two broad groups of relationships that fall outside functionalism’s purview: functionalism has little to say about the internal dynamics within an organization (e.g. relations between various organs, or between organization and staff), and functionalism has little to say about the relations of organizations with the outside world. And the latter in particular is of interest to the general international lawyer: it suggests that the responsibility of international organizations under international law cannot fruitfully be approached from a functionalist perspective, and further suggests that our available frameworks of thinking about organizations are inadequate to address such questions as whether organizations are bound by general international law. Functionalism, as devised and developed, never thought about such issues and, more importantly, never could have done so coherently at any rate: a theory focusing on the principal-agent relationships cannot accommodate other concerns, at least not without diluting its original focus. To put it strongly and in different terms, functionalism has a blind spot: the issue of control. Actors other than the member states have no means of controlling organizations. Read the rest of this entry…

 
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This Week: Discussion of Jan Klabbers’s ‘The Transformation of International Organizations Law’

Published on August 18, 2015        Author: 

Over the next few days, we will be hosting a discussion of the first annual EJIL Foreword, Jan Klabbers’s article “The Transformation of International Organizations Law,” which was published in volume 26, no. 1 of the European Journal of International Law (2015). The commentaries on his article will be by Alison Duxbury (Melbourne) and Ian Johnstone (The Fletcher School). We are grateful to all of them for participating in the discussion.

 
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OUP Timeline: The History of International Law

Published on August 17, 2015        Author: 

Our friends in Oxford University Press have created a very interesting visual timeline mapping the history of international law. It’s very interesting in its own right, but can also serve as a valuable teaching tool, especially if your university is subscribed to the Oxford PIL service.

Here is the blurb:

We have created a concise timeline mapping the broad history of public international law with particular attention paid to the signing of major treaties, the foundation of fundamental institutions, the birth of major figures in international law and milestones in the development of some of the field’s best-known doctrines. There are varying opinions on where to start in the history of international law, as well as arguments around periodising the dynamic developments, though for this project we have started our timeline with the Treaty of Tordesillas in 1494. Explore some of the major developments in the history of international law and read more by clicking through to freed-up chapters from the Oxford Historical Treaties, the Max Planck Encyclopaedia of Public International Law, relevant book chapters, blog pieces and journal articles.

OUP are happy to receive suggestions from our readers regarding both content and images – please send these directly to John.Louth {AT} oup.com .

 
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Creating Conduits: Summary Report of the First Annual Oxford Investment Claims Summer Academy, St. Anne’s College (Oxford)

This July 13-14, Oxford University Press and Investment Claims convened the First Annual Oxford Investment Claims Summer Academy at St. Anne’s College, the University of Oxford. Co-chaired by Diane Desierto, Ian Laird, and Frederic Sourgens, the Academy brought together a select expert group of academic and practitioner delegates to discuss the legitimacy of investor-state arbitration in the context of continuous and often virulent political criticism. The method and structure of the Academy departed from a traditional presentation format. Instead, the Academy as the first gathering of experts of its kind acted as a laboratory for open and rapid discussion of frontier issues among all participants. As a result of this format, the Academy constructively explored both traditional text-based and context-sensitive solutions for these frontier issues. ICJ Judge James Crawford’s keynote address to the delegates aptly captured the spirit of the open and critical discussion when noting that while there is little in the way of feasible alternative to investor-state arbitration and much to lose by its abolition. Bench, bar, and ivory tower must find it in them to become better stewards of this mode of international dispute resolution. In particular, there is an urgent need to address weaknesses made visible by the first two decades of sustained arbitral and annulment jurisprudence. With the depth of engagement at the inaugural session, the co-chairs are planning to hold the Academy again in the summer of 2016.

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Some Thoughts on the Serdar Mohammed Appeals Judgment

Published on August 10, 2015        Author: 

In this post I’d like to add a few thoughts on the recent Court of Appeal judgment in Serdar Mohammed, that we already covered on the blog last week (here and here). The case is now heading to the UK Supreme Court, and may also eventually end up in the European Court of Human Rights – although Strasbourg will be looking carefully at the Supreme Court’s judgment even if the case doesn’t find its way to it.

First off, I think everything that can be said about the ‘big issue’ of authority to detain in NIAC has already been said; those already committed to either view are not going to be dissuaded by some novel argument. For my part, I only wish to note that after the Court of Appeal’s (unanimous!) judgment it looks increasingly unlikely that the Supreme Court will overturn the finding of the lower courts (although that of course may still happen), especially bearing in mind the rigour and detail of these lower judgments. It is very difficult for any court to essentially make up rules (in reasoning by implication/analogy/structure or whatever) on who precisely can be detained in NIACs, for how long and under what exact process, in the absence of any meaningful legislative guidance. This is not a gap that most judges would feel comfortable in filling, especially when easy analogies to IACs or (much worse, between targeting and detention) break down.

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Announcements: University of Tampere workshop on the ECtHR for doctoral students

Published on August 9, 2015        Author: 

The University of Tampere is organising a workshop on the European Court of Human Rights for doctoral students. The workshop will take place on the 22nd and 23rd of October 2015 in Tampere, Finland. Facilitators for the workshop include Ed Bates, Kanstantsin Dzehtsiarou and former judge of the ECtHR Matti Pellonpää.  The workshop is intended for ten to fifteen Ph.D. students whose dissertations are on the topic of the ECtHR. The deadline for abstracts is 11th September 2015. For more details see here.  

Filed under: Announcements and Events
 
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Arbitration between Croatia and Slovenia: Leaks, Wiretaps, Scandal (Part 2)

Published on August 7, 2015        Author: 

As we described in our first post of last week, the completion of the arbitration between Croatia and Slovenia has been thrown into doubt by the revelation of illicit contacts between the Slovenian arbitrator (‘Slovenia’s arbitrator’? Or ‘the arbitrator of Slovenian nationality’? More on this in our next post) and the Slovenian agent. On 24 July, Croatia applied to the Tribunal to ‘suspend the proceedings with immediate effect’ and invited ‘the remaining members of the Tribunal to review the totality of the materials presented, and reflect on the grave damage that has been done to the integrity of the entire proceedings’. On 28 July, the Tribunal published a press release in which it announced that a hearing on the Croatian application would be arranged ‘in the coming days’. On 30 July, the arbitrator of Croatian nationality, Professor Budislav Vukas (formerly Vice-President of the International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea), resigned from the arbitration, and on July 31 Croatia itself formally informed the Tribunal that it ‘cannot continue the process in good faith’ and that ‘in accordance with the relevant provisions of the Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties’ it ‘informed the other Signatory to the Agreement of its intention to terminate’ the Arbitration. On 3 August, ICJ President Abraham resigned from the Tribunal, informing it that he had agreed to his appointment to ‘help restore confidence between the Parties and the Arbitral Tribunal and to allow the process to continue normally, with the consent of both Parties’ but that ‘the current situation cannot meet that expectation’ so that ‘it was no longer appropriate’ for him to serve as arbitrator.

At the end of our first post, we posed a number of preliminary questions that this scandal raises. In this post, we shall attempt, if not to provide definitive answers, at least to illustrate the context and consequences of these issues, with specific attention to the immediate repercussions for the arbitration. We shall follow this with a Part 3 post, on the wider implications for the international legal profession and the international judicial system.

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The UK Court of Appeal in Serdar Mohammed: Treaty and Customary IHL Provides No Authority for Detention in Non-international Armed Conflicts

Published on August 6, 2015        Author: 

Last week’s judgment in Mohammed v. Secretary of State for Defence is rich in analyses and observations concerning detention in non-international armed conflicts (NIACs). One of the key issues assessed concerns the power to detain in NIACs under IHL.

The Secretary of State’s position on this point commenced with a challenge to traditional classifications of armed conflict, contrasting purely internal conflicts with armed conflicts between two States (para 168). It was contended that the legal position concerning the authority to detain in a NIAC now reflects a more complex factual position than that captured under traditional classifications. A third classification must now be recognized: ‘internationalised’ NIACs. This echoes the ICRC’s Opinion Paper on internment, which speaks of ‘NIACs with an extraterritorial element’, in which “the armed forces of one or more State, or of an international or regional organization, fight alongside the armed forces of a host State, in its territory, against one or more organized non-State armed groups” (page 7).

To paraphrase, ‘if it looks and feels like an international armed conflict, let us apply IHL rules on international armed conflicts by analogy’. This is a dangerous approach that the Court of Appeal carefully avoided, instead focusing on its proposed implications.

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The Authority to Detain in NIACs Revisited: Serdar Mohammed in the Court of Appeal

Published on August 5, 2015        Author: 

As the English Court of Appeal breaks for the summer vacation, scores of international lawyers are about to descend on one of its latest decisions: Mohammed v Secretary of State for Defence; Rahmatullah and Ors v MoD and FCO [2015] EWCA Civ 843. In this 109-page long judgment, the Court upholds the conclusion reached at first instance by Leggatt J that British armed forces participating in ISAF lacked the legal authority under international law to detain suspected insurgents captured in Afghanistan.

The implications of Serdar Mohammed are considerable. The case raises difficult questions about the place the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR) occupies in the international legal order and, more broadly, about the relationship between international human rights law and international humanitarian law (IHL). Those who have followed this debate will recall that we were not convinced by Leggatt J’s reasoning on these points (see here, here and here). In so far as it upholds his main conclusions, we also find ourselves in disagreement with the judgment now delivered by the Court of Appeal. Rather than rehearsing our arguments on the underlying issues in full (see in detail here), in this post we would like to briefly comment on those aspects of the Court’s decision which, in our view, take the debate forward and those which do not. Read the rest of this entry…

 

The Human Rights Committee, Treaty Interpretation, and the Last Word

Published on August 5, 2015        Author: 

July 24 marked the end of the most recent session of the Human Rights Committee, a part-time body operating under the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, 999 UNTS 171. At its most recent session – its 114th – the Committee adopted “Concluding Observations” concerning seven States as part of the state-reporting process. It also adopted “Views” with respect to 32 individual petitions lodged against States under the Covenant’s Optional Protocol, 999 UNTS 302, finding violations in 17 cases, as reported in the UN press release issued to mark the session’s closing. The Committee also held a half-day discussion in preparation for a new “General Comment” on the right to life, possibly for release at the end of 2016, and an informal meeting with States parties, of which there are now 168, confirming the Covenant’s status as a leading human rights treaty.

As usual, the Human Rights Committee also engaged in dialogue with both national and international human rights NGOs, many of whom brought forward issues and perspectives of use to the Committee’s understanding of State reports. The Committee also heard from national human rights institutions (NHRIs). But organizations and institutions have goals and mandates, just as those who represent States operate under instructions, and one can understand that those with a goal to achieve in their efforts to influence the content forthcoming from a treaty-monitoring body may not wish to provide a critique of the treaty body itself, at least not while the Committee is meeting. But critiques have value for the overall system for the protection and promotion of human rights, with a treaty body’s sense of its role in the field having potential implications for continuing State support.

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