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Announcements: Oxford Research Fellowship in Law and Armed Conflict; International Organizations Scholarship Workshop

Published on September 20, 2014        Author: 

1) The Oxford Martin Programme on Human Rights for Future Generations invites applications for a Postdoctoral Research Fellow position in the area of Law and Armed Conflict. This is a fixed-term appointment until 31 March 2016, commencing as soon as possible. The postholder will be based at Pembroke College, Oxford. The Oxford Martin Programme on Human Rights for Future Generations  a research programme in the University of Oxford, which focuses on the question of whether human rights constitutes an appropriate framework for confronting some of the most serious problems facing current and future generations. Within this shared framework the research programme focuses on three of the most urgent aspects of insecurity; armed conflict, poverty and environmental change. The successful applicant will be required to conduct research on the themes above as directed by the Programme Co-Directors (which includes Dapo Akande) and to work as part of an interdisciplinary team. Applicants will be expected to write papers and articles linked to the programme’s area of focus, for publication in books, peer-reviewed journals and/or edited books. The deadline for completed applications is 13 October 2014. Further details are available here.

2) Call for Papers – International Organizations Scholarship Workshop. The International Organizations Interest Group of the American Society of International Law will hold a works-in-progress workshop on Friday, December 12th, 2014, in New York City.  Authors interested in presenting a paper at the workshop can submit an abstract to David Gartner (David.Gartner {at} asu(.)edu), Julian Arato (arato.julian {at} gmail(.)com), and Sarah Dadush (sdadush {at} kinoy.rutgers(.)edu)  by the end of the day on October 1, 2014. Abstracts should be a couple of paragraphs long but not more than one page. Papers should relate to the topic of international institutions and governance.  Papers should not yet be in print so that authors will have time to make revisions based on the comments from the workshop.

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Geoff Corn and Guglielmo Verdirame take part in Transatlantic Dialogue on International Law and Armed Conflict

Published on September 19, 2014        Author: 

This week guglielmo-verdirame_0 Professors Geoff Corn (left, South Texas College of Law)j-corn and Guglielmo Verdirame (right, Kings College London & barrister at 20 Essex Street) contributed pieces in the joint blog series arising out of the Transatlantic Workshop on International Law and Armed Conflict held in Oxford this past July.

Geoff Corn’s piece, “Squaring the Circle: The Intersection of Battlefield Regulation and Criminal Responsibility”, was posted at Lawfare at the start of this week. In this thoughtful pose, Geoff says:

“I sought to highlight what I believe are several evidentiary and institutional complexities associated with subjecting commanders and other operational decision-makers to criminal accountability for battle-command judgments – complexities that will become more significant as cases focus increasingly on complex operational decision-making, particularly in relation to targeting.”

He raises a number of important issues relating to the feasibility of international criminal prosecutions to produce credible accountability decisions in relation to battlefield decision-making. One question he addresses, which is particularly novel but really important is this:

“[A] complicated aspect of criminal prosecution based on alleged unlawful targeting decisions is the relationship between LOAC/IHL presumptions and criminal burdens of proof. The presumption of innocence an axiomatic component of any fundamentally fair trial, and imposes on the prosecution the burden of production and the burden of persuasion. However, several LOAC/IHL targeting rules are based on presumptions which, when applied in the criminal context, arguably shift the burden of production to the defense.”

At the the end of the week, Guglielmo’s piece, “Taming War through Law – A Philosophical & Legal Perspective” , was posted on InterCross (the blog of the ICRC. Guglielmo begins his post in this way:

“The relationship between theory and practice in international law eludes easy explanations. In the history of international law there are examples of ideas shaping practice. But at times the phenomenon of international law – with its complex mix of state practice, adjudication and politics – finds directions not foreseen by any theory.

The application of human rights law to armed conflict may be a case in point. It emerged over the last two decades from the decisions of international and domestic courts without being preceded by a reflection – by jurists, policy-makers or others – on how human rights could contribute to regulating armed conflict. Can this development be accommodated within the system of international law or does it in some way challenge its architecture?”

His post then examines the work of Kant, Grotius and Hobbes, together with decisions of the European Court of Human Rights and the UK courts, in his survey of the question whether human rights law should apply to armed conflicts.

 

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The Conviction of Cambodian Khmer Rouge Leaders– Justice at last?

Published on September 18, 2014        Author: 

On 7 August 2014, the Trial Chamber of the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia (ECCC) delivered its second trial judgment. This lengthy decision addressed the criminal responsibility of the two remaining ‘senior leaders’ of the Democratic Kampuchea regime that are the subject of Case 002: Noun Chea (Pol Pot’s second in command) and Khieu Samphan (the President of the State Presidium and the ‘public face’ of the regime). Both were convicted of crimes against humanity and sentenced to life imprisonment, the maximum penalty available under the ECCC Law. The Chamber also endorsed a number of reparations projects requested by civil parties. The judgment is significant for its detailed consideration of one of the most vivid images of the Khmer Rouge era – the evacuation of Phnom Penh and other cities, and whether this population movement was contrary to international law.

Case 002 concerns crimes committed throughout Cambodia during the entire period of the Democratic Kampuchea regime, which existed from 17 April 1975 to 6 January 1979. It is one of the most complex cases to be conducted before an international or internationalised criminal tribunal. Recognising this, as well the uncertain nature of funding for the ECCC and the fear that the advanced age of the accused meant there was a real possibility that they would not live to judgment, the Trial Chamber severed Case 002 into separate trials in September 2011. The judgment delivered in August is the first in this series of trials (hence Case 002/01), and is limited to considering three crime ‘sites’ only: the evacuation of the population of Phnom Penh (and other cities) into the countryside in April 1975 (first population movement); a further movement of the population between various zones from September 1975 to at least December 1977 (second population movement); and the execution of former Khmer Republic officials and soldiers in connection with the first population movement, in particular the executions committed at Tuol Po Chrey in April 1975. All other crime sites and policies are to be considered in future ‘mini-trials’. Read the rest of this entry…

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Email Notifications Still Not Working

Published on September 18, 2014        Author: 

Our email notification function still is not working properly since we moved to a new web host. We apologize for the inconvenience and are working on a solution. Rest assured that no one has been dropped from the subscriber list, so once we sort out the technical issue subscribers should begin receiving emails again.

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The Grand Chamber Judgment in Hassan v UK

Published on September 16, 2014        Author: 

The eagerly-awaited Grand Chamber judgment in the case of Hassan v UK has now been released, and its importance for anyone interested in extraterritoriality, detention and the relationship between international humanitarian law (IHL) and international human rights law (IHRL) cannot be overstated. For the first time in its history, the Court has explicitly offered its view on the interaction between IHL and IHRL and the operation of the Convention, particularly the right to liberty, in the context of an international armed conflict.

A good overview of the facts of the case and the Court’s judgment can be found here, and they will not be repeated in this post. Instead, I want to offer some initial thoughts on the Court’s reasoning with regard to Article 5 ECHR and, more specifically, its approach to treaty interpretation.

The question before the Grand Chamber was whether the internment of the applicant’s brother, which appeared to conform with the Third and Fourth Geneva Conventions, could be considered consistent with Article 5 ECHR, notwithstanding the absence of any derogation by the UK. At a very general level, the Court effectively had two options here. On the one hand, it could have followed the path it appeared to be laying in its previous case-law, particularly in Al-Skeini and Al-Jedda, and hold that, where jurisdiction exists and where no lawful derogation has been made, the State remains bound to honour its obligations under the ECHR as ordinarily interpreted. Had the Court taken this approach, the Contracting States may eventually have conceded defeat and begun derogating in extra-territorial contexts. (Incidentally, the Court continued to avoid explicitly engaging with the permissibility of extra-territorial derogations.) Instead, the Court adopted the alternative approach, interpreting the ECHR so as to leave room for the broader powers that States have under IHL. Thus, it effectively read into Article 5(1) ECHR an extra permissible ground for detention where consistent with the Third and Fourth Geneva Conventions, and it read down the requirement of habeas corpus in Article 5(4) to allow for the administrative forms of review under the Fourth Geneva Convention.

Let’s begin with a few, in my view, positive points about the Court’s approach here. First, and perhaps most importantly, the Court rejected the UK’s principal argument that IHL as the lex specialis precluded jurisdiction arising under Article 1 ECHR (para 77). To have followed this would effectively have been to displace the entire Convention where IHL applies. Instead, the Court adopted a more nuanced, case-by-case approach which looks at the specific right at issue. This enables the Court to retain its oversight function by assessing the legality of the actions of Contracting Parties through the prism of IHL.

Read the rest of this entry…

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Scottish Independence and EU Membership: Part II

Published on September 16, 2014        Author: 

Introduction

In my previous post (here), I addressed the reasons why international law and EU both arrive at the conclusion that an independent Scotland would not automatically succeed to EU membership. Given that it now seems to be accepted on all sides that membership of the EU would therefore need to be negotiated, much of the previous post can be considered a necessary background to the following discussion. In this post, I consider the correct legal basis in the European Treaties for negotiated EU membership, as well as some of the problems involved in the negotiations, the consequences if they fail, and how such issues might come to be considered by the Court of Justice.

Due to the complexity of the issues and the consequent length of this post, it is only appropriate to summarise my view from the outset. In theory, I consider that either Article 48 or Article 49 of the Treaty on European Union (TEU) could be utilised in order to facilitate EU membership for an independent Scotland. However, both routes involve significant difficulties, and it is likely that an Article 48 process would be the more problematic of the two, and could be blocked. In any case, it appears that the Scottish Government’s proposals for the timetable from a ‘Yes’ vote to independence day are wildly optimistic.

On balance, and contrary to the position in the Scottish Government’s White Paper, it may therefore be the case that Article 49 should be preferred by the Scottish Government, for the reasons I set out below. However, whichever process is used, if the date for independence day is immovable, then the possibility of the requisite membership steps remaining incomplete at that time is a nettle (or a thistle!) that must be grasped. In such a scenario, I envisage that EU law would be given continuity of effect, and that it would be possible or even likely that a case would reach the Court of Justice which would test this point. However, such a position would probably be an interim solution at best, and could still result, in the worst case scenario, in the EU rights and obligations of an independent Scotland, its citizens, and its companies, coming to an end. Read the rest of this entry…

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Filed under: EJIL Analysis, European Union
 

Human Rights Council Panel Discussion on Privacy in the Digital Age

Published on September 15, 2014        Author: 

Last Friday I had the privilege of moderating the panel discussion on the right to privacy in the digital age at the 27th regular session of the Human Rights Council. The video of the panel discussion is available here, and a press release summarizing some of the statements here. OHCHR will be producing a more detailed report on the discussion in due course.

It was a very interesting event, which benefited from four great panelists – Catalina Botero, the special rapporteur on the freedom of expression in the Inter-American system; Sarah Cleveland, professor at Columbia Law School; Yves Nissim, deputy chief of corporate social responsibility at Orange Telecom; and Carly Nyst, legal director of Privacy International. The discussion was lively and interactive, and also benefited from many comments from the floor by states and various NGOs. (Incidentally Dapo will also be moderating a HRC panel discussion next week on drones and counter-terrorism, also with an excellent cast of participants).

There was broad endorsement, from states as well as from the panelists, of the High Commissioner’s important report on the right to privacy in the digital age, with some disagreement on specific issues. The comments from the floor were quite varied in terms of topic, but two big themes were the application of the ICCPR to extraterritorial surveillance (on which see more here), and the quantity and quality of oversight and accountability mechanisms. The panelists and NGOs also called for the establishment of a new special rapporteur on the right to privacy.

The right to privacy in the digital age and the High Commissioner’s report will next be considered by the UN General Assembly at its forthcoming session next month.

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Announcements: Conference in Amsterdam on Transnational Standards in Domestic Law, Conference in Warsaw on Crimea, Human Rights Essay Competition, Matrix Chambers Deadline Extended

Published on September 13, 2014        Author: 

1.  On 24 October 2014, the University of Amsterdam and its research project “Architecture of Postnational Rulemaking” will be hosting a workshop on “Transnational Standards in the Domestic Legal Order: Authority and Legitimacy”. The keynote speaker is Professor Nico Krisch, Institut Barcelona d’Estudis Internacionals. Further information about the workshop, the registration and the venue can be found here.

2.  First circular of 2015 Conference “The Case of Crimea in the Light of International Law: its Nature and Implications” (Save the Date). The Centre for Polish-Russian Dialogue and Understanding and the Institute of Law Studies of Polish Academy of Sciences are pleased to issue this invitation to attend the international conference “The Case of Crimea in the Light of International Law: its Nature and Implications(19-20 March 2015, Warsaw, Poland). The aim is to provide in-depth analysis of Ukraine-Russia conflict through the lenses of international law. Special attention shall be given to the following legal questions: the use of force and the threat of use of force, the crime of aggression, annexation, incorporation, occupation, state responsibility, individual responsibility, statehood and self-determination in international law, territorial integrity, state support for the armed bands, groups, irregulars or mercenaries, the nature of direct participation of regular armed forces without insignia in combat. If you wish to attend the conference please register your interest by e-mail at crimeaconference2015 {at} yahoo(.)pl. Subsequently, the call for papers will be announced in September/October and will give further information about accommodation, the general scientific programme, preparation of abstracts and final papers.

3.  Call for Submissions. Are you interested in attending an all-expense paid 3 week summer program on Human Rights and Humanitarian Law taught by over 40 world-renowned practitioners and academics at American University Washington College of Law? Well, now is your chance! Submit an essay to the Human Rights Essay Award Competition and you could be the lucky winner to receive a scholarship to attend the 2015 Program of Advanced Studies in Human Rights and Humanitarian Law. This year’s topic is “Transitional Justice, International Human Rights and Humanitarian Law” and the deadline to submit is February 1, 2015. Participants have the flexibility to choose any subject related to the assigned topic. The best articles may be published in the American University International Law Review. This annual competition sponsored by the Academy on Human Rights and Humanitarian Law seeks to stimulate the production of scholarly work in international human rights law. The Academy will grant two Awards, one for the best article in English and one for the best article in Spanish. The Award in each case will consist of: a scholarship to the Academy’s Program of Advanced Studies, travel expenses to Washington D.C., housing at the university dorms and a per diem for living expenses. For detailed guidelines about the award please see here or contact us at hracademy {at} wcl.american(.)edu.

4.  Matrix Chambers has extended the deadline to apply for its International Law team to 26 September. It is looking to recruit additional members to complement its core International Law team. Matrix invites applications from experienced barristers, lawyers, and academics who have an established and exceptional international law practice, either in England and Wales, or in other jurisdictions. Matrix Chambers is a leading set of barristers with 70 members and 7 associate members and offices in London and Geneva. Individual members of Matrix Chambers have experience and expertise in a wide range of international law areas including maritime, humanitarian, environmental, boundary disputes, oil and gas disputes, investment treaty disputes, and disputes between States. Members of Chambers attract an increasing amount of private international law work in addition to the public international law cases for which they are renowned for, along with a commitment to developing non-litigation work, including advisory work on Corporate Social Responsibility, investigatory work, and international mediation. The successful candidates will need to demonstrate that they are outstanding International Law practitioners with a strong reputation in the international arena, who support the Core Values of Matrix. Application packs can be obtained by e-mailing recruitment {at} matrixlaw.co(.)uk or calling +44 (0)20 7404 3447. The deadline for receipt of applications is Friday 12th September 2014. Any potential applicants who wish to discuss their application may contact Practice Manager Paul Venables (paulvenables {at} matrixlaw.co(.)uk) or the International Law group coordinator Professor Zachary Douglas (zacharydouglas {at} matrixlaw.co(.)uk). The full advert is available  here.

 

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Developing the Law of Non-International Armed Conflict: A View of the Harmonization Project

Published on September 12, 2014        Author: 

Editor’s Note: This post is part of the joint series of posts hosted by EJIL:Talk!, Lawfare and Intercross (blog of the International Committee of the Red Cross) and arising out of the Transatlantic Workshop on International Law and Armed Conflict held in Oxford this summer.

This post is a response to Professor Sarah Cleveland’s post on the Columbia-based Harmonization Project that Professor Cleveland and Sir Daniel Bethlehem are leading. That project explores the potential for applying the law of international armed conflict (IAC) in non-international armed conflicts (NIACs), as a means of developing the law applicable in the latter. The conclusion of the project is that the large majority of the rules applicable in IACs can be transplanted into NIACs without amendment and that this should be done by States either multilaterally or via unilateral declarations.

A detailed, rule-by-rule consideration of the degree to which parity between the law of IAC and NIAC is practicable is a very useful endeavour. Indeed, historically this has been the method by which the law of NIAC has developed. It is clear why this should have been the case. When the first international humanitarian law (IHL) treaties were adopted in the mid-nineteenth century, international law was still, by and large, a law governing inter-State relations. Matters that did not directly engage such relations, including NIACs, were thus generally excluded. Customary rules did of course develop to govern certain NIACs, such as the doctrine of belligerency, but these often applied only where another, non-party State was affected by the conflict.

As international law expanded to include the regulation of purely intra-State matters (reflected in human rights instruments, as well as the Genocide Convention, adopted in the aftermath of the Second World War), this basis for marginalising NIACs began to fall away. Rules traditionally applicable only in IACs could now move over into NIACs. And indeed this is what has happened: common Article 3 to the 1949 Geneva Conventions and Additional Protocol II were based on the law of IAC. This is also true of the customary rules recognised by the ICTY and ICRC.

It is therefore only natural that we should look to the law of IAC in developing the law of NIAC. This post, however, will offer some words of caution in adopting this method of humanising NIACs. In particular, it will be argued that both general and specific arguments militate against this supposedly self-evident means by which to develop the law of NIAC.

General Concerns

The Harmonization Project declares its goal as being to build upon current obligations in NIACs—it is limited to IHL and does not seek to make a claim regarding the relationship between IHL and human rights law. However, it seems to me that one cannot avoid such questions when considering proposals for developing the law of NIAC. Indeed, if one’s goal is further to humanise NIACs (as the Harmonization Project’s seems to be) then one must tread carefully in proposing the extension of IHL in toto to NIACs. As David Kretzmer has shown, far from increasing protections, this method could in fact undermine existing protections. Read the rest of this entry…

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Joint Blog Series on International Law and Armed Conflict: Ken Watkin on the Overlap between IHL and IHLR: Part II

Published on September 11, 2014        Author: 

BOG_Ken WatkinThe latest post in the joint blog series we are hosting with Lawfare and Intercross is Part II of Brigadier General (Rtd) Ken Watkin QC’s piece on “The Overlap between IHL and IHRL”. The piece  is posted on Intercross, where you can also find Part I. Ken Watkin was the senior legal adviser in the Canadian Armed Forces and, also  a former Stockton Professor of International Law at the US Naval War College. The joint series arises out of the 2nd annual Transatlantic Workshop on International Law and Armed Conflict, which took place in Oxford in July.

Ken begins his latest post in this way:

Last week, I described  the “exclusionary” approaches to the application of international humanitarian law (IHL) and international law human rights law (IHRL), which assume that one body of law will apply to the exclusion of the other. I also described how the approaches taken by the United States and Canada differ from those taken by European nations, the latter approach being influenced, in large part, by decisions of the European Court of Human Rights. However, the widely and often loudly debated exclusionary approaches do not actually represent how the law is being applied, particularly in a North American context. The reality of contemporary conflict is that both normative frameworks often need to be relied on concurrently. The application of human rights based norms occurs less through consideration of IHRL treaty law obligations than by operation of customary law obligations (both IHRL and IHL), the application of domestic law, or as a matter of policy. There is increasing recognition that Common Article 3 and Article 75 of Additional Protocol I apply as a matter of customary international law to international operations. Article 75 was clearly influenced by the 1948 Universal Declaration on Human Rights and the 1966 International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights. As then Professor Christopher Greenwood noted, the relationship between IHL and human rights law “is expressed in the adoption of major human rights principles in Article 75 AP I” [Christopher Greenwood, “Scope of Application of Humanitarian Law”, in Dieter Fleck, ed., The Handbook of International Humanitarian Law (2nd ed., 2008), 74, Rule 254.] Significantly, these human rights norms must be applied regardless of the geographic location of the armed conflict, thereby avoiding the intractable debate regarding the extra-territorial application of IHRL treaty law.

Read the rest on Intercross!

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